• Telopea Park School project on French enlistments

Students from Telopea Park School (Canberra, Australia) have been working with the National Archives of Australia to learn about six people who were born in France, but enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in World War I. This is what they have learnt.
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    • lhalliday
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    Prosper Magescas was born in Bordeaux, France. After being naturalised, he worked at Mort's Dock for Engineer's Coy. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Forces (AIF) in February 1915 in Sydney, New South Wales at the age of 27 years. His first deployment was to Gallipoli, for which he earned a 1914-1915 Star Medal. He received a gun wound to his right knee, and in consequence, he returned to Australia, where he was discharged for being medically unfit. He worked in the Small Arms Factory at Lithgow. In May 1917, Magescas re-enlisted in the AIF, lying about his personal information in his attestation papers, including his age, saying he was 26 years old. His second enlistment was approved, however after four months, he was discharged due to his injured knee, once again deemed medically unfit.

    • knaughtin
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    Alexander Mary Fillodeau was born in Marans, France in 1868. Before the war, he was a Roman Catholic priest and worked as a missionary in Papua New Guinea. He was naturalised and enlisted as a Chaplain in December 1915 when he was 48 years old. He was not married and did not have a biological next of kin. Therefore, his next of kin was Bishop J Carrol. Fillodeau served five months in the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) in Rabaul, Papua New Guinea. Following this he returned to Australia and enlisted in the AIF in August 1916. He served on the Western Front until July 1917. He then returned to Australia with a Victory Medal and British War Medal (which he received on the 10th of May1923).

    • knaughtin
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    Following the footsteps of Emilienne Dubrulle Emilienne Dubrulle was born in Aniche, France in 1891. She had a brother Emile Dubrulle. She was a staff nurse and enlisted on 15 November 1917 in Perth (West-Australia). She went to India and married Mr. Levitt on the 8 may 1918.

    • knaughtin
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    A valiant soldier - the story of one man who just could not give up. Leon Jean Louis Briand was a French soldier, born in St. Malo, Brittany, who became a naturalised Australian subject. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in 1914, and was sent to Europe to participate in the Gallipoli campaign, during which he was injure. Following this injury, Leon suffered several more bullet wounds, and then went absent without leave multiple times, and was subsequently punished with 18 months of I.H.L. He was taken prisoner of war by the Austro-Hungarian Empire near the end of battle of La Somme in 1917 after suffering from shrapnel to his right leg, and was held until the end of the war in 1918, when he was sent back to his home in Guildford, Western Australia.

    • knaughtin
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    Léon Ellie Turbe, 2863 Before arriving in Australia, Léon Ellie Turbe had served two years in the French army and five and a half years in the French navy. After arriving in Australia, he worked as a dealer and slaughterman. Towards the end of the First World War at the age of 33, on the 6th of November 1916, Turbe tried to enlist for the army in Sydney. As the forces of Australia became increasingly strained as a result of the war, Turbe, a short Frenchman was accepted into the Australian Imperial Force. On the 24th of November 1916, he embarked for WWI as a soldier of the 34th Battalion. He was reported killed in action during the 5th and 6th of May 1918 after being incorrectly reported missing. He received a British War Medal and a Victory Medal for his participation in WWI for the Allied Forces.

    • knaughtin
    • Thursday, 13 November 2014

    Insight into the life of dear Charles Bonnette Charles Aimé BONNETTE enlisted twice in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Firstly, he enlisted in October 1915 at age 37. After 21 days absence, he was promptly discharged as a deserter prior to leaving Australia. He enlisted again in January of 1917 but was returned home a year later, discharged due to nephritis, returning to Australia in October 1918. Born in Meuse, it is possible Bonnette enlisted to defend his home country and area of birth which were both strongly involved in the First World War in Europe. He served in the 1st Light Trench Mortar Battery. Charles Aimé BONNETTE a été mobilisé deux fois dans "The Australian Imperial Force" (AIF). Tout d'abord, il est mobilisé en octobre 1915, à 37 ans. Après 21 jours d'absence, il a été rapidement acquitté comme un déserteur avant de quitter l'Australie. Il se remobilisa de nouveau en janvier 1917, mais a été renvoyé un an plus tard, acquitté en raison de la néphrite, et retourné en Australie en octobre 1918. Né dans la Meuse, il est possible que Bonnette s'est mobilisé pour défendre sa région d'origine en France qui a été fortement impliqué dans la Première Guerre mondiale en Europe. Il a servi dans la "1st Light Tench Mortar Battery".