• Bernhardt Herman Walther

Army / Flying Corps
  • 3rd Australian Machine Gun Company
  • 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
  • 3rd Brigade
  • Captain

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  • 1914–1915 Star
  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
  • Enlistment - WW1

    Perth WA, Australia

  • Birth

    Murtoa, VIC, Australia

Stories and comments
    • Bernhardt Hermann Walther - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Thursday, 26 March 2015

    Profile image from the National Library of Australia. NLA ‘Trove’ Website – (Image) Captain Bernhardt Herman Walther Western Mail Friday 25 August 1916. Follow the links to Australian War Memorial, State Library of W.A., Museum Victoria, University of N.S.W., Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Everyman Remembered, and NLA `Trove` websites to view the images and other articles as they appeared in the newspapers of the day.

    • Bernhardt Hermann Walther - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Thursday, 26 March 2015

    Captain Walther Killed. From Private To Captain The news that Captain B. H. Walther had been killed in France towards the end of July was received by that officer's colleagues in the Colonial Secretary's Department with feelings of deepest regret yesterday. In a recent issue of the "Civil Service Journal" an appreciation of Captain Walther's rapid promotion since he left Western Australia as a member of the first expeditionary force was published. The paragraph read: - "The story of the promotion of an unassuming youth, who cut loose from red tape to put on khaki in the first rush to the colours on the declaration of war, reads like a romance. When the war tocain sounded 'Bernie' Walther was a junior clerk in the accounts branch of the Colonial Secretary's office. In his capacity of citizen soldier, he was attached to a machine gun section, all the members of whom volunteered. He sailed with the first contingent, and, during the period in Egypt his rise on the ladder of promotion began. When the Australians went to Gallipoli he sported one stripe; but he gave early evidence of his mettle as a soldier. An exploit in which, in company with two others, he and his machine gun peppered the Turks, has already been mentioned. The next news, told how he had risen to the command of the section; later we were told he had attained to sergeant's rank. In December last, a little over a year after his first arrival in Egypt he received his commission. Promotion had been rapid, but the end was not yet. During the month, his father received a letter from 'Somewhere in France' from him stating that he had been promoted to captain as from March 4 last. From private to captain in eighteen months, while on active service, is an achievement of which a young man just 21 years of age has reason to be proud: and his numerous friends in the Colonial Secretary's Department heartily congratulate him. The West Australian Friday 4 August 1916.

    • Bernhardt Hermann Walther - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Thursday, 26 March 2015

    Murtoa Soldier Falls A message was received in Murtoa on Thursday night conveying news of the sad death in France of Lieut. Bernhardt Walther, grandson of Mr. J. P. Walther. He was a son of Mr. Gustav Walther, of West Australia. Warracknabeal Herald Tuesday 8 August 1916.

    • Bernhardt Hermann Walther - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Thursday, 26 March 2015

    A Perth Captain Killed In France. News was received early this month that on July 25 Captain Bernie H. Walther died of wounds in France. The officer was born on 1 May 31, 1895, and was one of the youngest captains in the Imperial Forces. He joined the infantry in Perth as a private, just after the outbreak of war, and during the Gallipoli campaign had so many wonderful escapes that he was believed by his comrades to have a "charmed life." For some years Walther served in the Office of the Colonial Secretary, and was popular amongst the officers of the Civil Service. He was a son of Mr. J. E. Walther, Surrey Chambers. His mother has been very ill for many months, and now lies in a precarious condition. Northern Times Saturday 19 August 1915.

    • Bernhardt Hermann Walther - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Thursday, 26 March 2015

    “Boycy”. The Late Captain Walther. "Hearing the continued sound of moving feet and the intermittent bouncing of a bail we opened the door and looked out. It was Sunday morning, and tbe building, Surrey Chambers, St George's terrace, Perth, was otherwise as quiet and as gloomy as a week-day hive of business, offices usually is, on the Sabbath. We discovered the cause of the commotion. He was a boy with flaxen hair and happy face. He was supposed to be doing a few little duties in the pile of offices of which his father has been caretaker for so many years, but schoolboy-like, he was playing handball up and down one of the corridors instead. The bouncing ball kept him rather actively employed, so he didn't see us until running back along the corridor he came full upon us standing at the office door, in affected indignation. He stopped and gasped in wide-eyed astonishment. "I beg your pardon," were his words, "but I didn't know anyone was in their office on Sundays. I'm sorry if I disturbed you" And, as he stood there and spoke in that frank manner, we thought, well, you're a fine manly lad, anyway, and said, "What is your name?" ''Boyce Walther," he replied, "My people live in this building." "Oh," was our rejoinder, "so you're the lad they want when they're calling for Boycy up and down the corridors in the evenings? "Yes". That was ten years ago, and Boyce was a school lad of eleven then. We watched him grow up through the changing years; saw him proud, for the first time in his schoolboy's cadet suit, and afterwards leave school to go to business, and then, about two years ago, join the first expeditionary force, go into camp, and subsequently depart for Gallipoli. He went as a private. From time to time his father showed us some of his letters from Gallipoli, Egypt, etc. Promotion, promotion earned on the field came rapidly to him; he went through all grades to captain, the latter being assigned him in France - and he just 21. In all his letters, with all his experience, honours and success, he was just the same frank, schoolboy, "Boycy" of the ball, of the Surrey Chambers corridor. He always wrote as such. And now "somewhere in France" he is sleeping the last, long peaceful, dreamless sleep that must come to all. He is of the valiant dead-those whose names are never meant to die. Western Mail Friday 25 August 1916.