• These three soldiers are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Cargeeg, of “Keswick”, Perry Street, Claremont.

Reginald Ewbank Cargeeg. Private Reginald Ewbank Cargeeg (383) was born at Adelaide and educated at the Perth Boys School and Scotch College. Prior to his 21st birthday he volunteered at Bunbury on the 17th August, 1914, for active service, and after passing the test was sent into Blackboy Camp for training He spent 2½ months there, training with the 11th Battalion Signallers, and then left W.A. with the 1st Australian Expeditionary Force, per the s.s. Ascanius. He participated in the landing at Gallipoli, but two days later, on the 27th of April, 1915, was wounded, and as a result was declared unfit for further service. He, with numerous applicants, was recommended by his Battalion and brigade officers for a comission in Kitchener’s Army. Albert Victor Selway Cargeeg. Private Albert Victor Selway Cargeeg (877) was born at Adelaide and educated at Perth Boys' School and Scotch College. He enlisted with his brother at Bunbury on the 17th August, 1914, and two days later went with him into Blackboy Camp. Here he was attached to A Company, 11th Battalion, and remained with them until he was transferred to the Machine Gun Section in Egypt. He left W.A. with the 1st Australian Contingent, per the s.s. Ascanius. He participated in the landing at Gallipoli on the 25th April, 1915, and served with the Machine Gun Section until he was killed in action on the 1st August 1915. He was recommended by Captain C. Jackson for conspicuous bravery in carrying messages to Headquarters, also his application for a commission in Kitchener’s Army was passed and forwarded to Headquarters by his Brigade Colonel. Prior to his enlistment he was the manager of Parkfield station, near Bunbury Harold Spencer Cargeeg. Private Harold Spencer Cargeeg (52003) was born in South Australia, and educated at Way College, Adelaide. He enlisted in October, 1917, and qualified at the N.C.O.’s School at Claremont. He embarked in March, 1918, for England, passing through Egypt, Southern Italy and France en route. He completed his training at Fovant Camp, and was finally drafted to France in September, 1918, where he joined up with the 11th Battalion. After the signing of the Armistice he was transferred to the 2nd Division Headquarters. Australia’s Fighting Sons of the Empire. Page 69.
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