• Walter Dollman

Army / Flying Corps
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    • The Men of the 27th Battalion
    • Posted by jaydsydaus121, Sunday, 25 July 2021

    Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Thursday 11 November 1915, page 6 THE 27th BATTALION ON GALLIPOLI. Lieutenant-Colonel W. Dollman, V.D., who is in command of the 27th Battalion (South Australia) of the Australian Impe-rial forces, in a letter to a friend from Gallipoli, dated September 30, says:—"As a study in contrasts the unique experience we are undergoing in the fire trenches is calculated to carry one's thoughts back to the dear homeland and all that it means and has meant for us. It is an astonish-ing fact that in the particular kind of war-fare in which we are engaged the training of all the past years seems to have been of little, if any, use. The conditions are new and strange, and we are really learn-ing as we go along. The country over which we are operating is of a very diffi-cult nature-steep hills with short bush growth, something like stunted mallee. We are told to expect a severe, cold winter, but extent on occasional nights the wea-ther is still hot. Flies are innumerable and pestiferous. We relieved a New Zea-land brigade, and have been under fire since the night we arrived here. We get copies of War Office telegrams frequently, but that is the only news that filters through. The arrival of a mail is an event to be remembered, and so far we have had little to complain of. Our boys are very keen on, their work, and I think quite up to 'Australian sample.' They have at-tracted a lot of attention by reason of their fine physique, their camp sanitation, and marching qualities. They are cool and collected, and have shown fine initiative in their work. As trench-diggers they are marvels. The news from Adelaide that 'The Chronicle' brings is very cheering. The prospects of a good year and the im-proved commercial outlook are very satis-fying. It is good to know that the public appeal for recruits has been so successful, and the best news we can have is that those behind are pushing on. Am glad to say my health is good, and at time of writing our casualties have been compara-tively light. Best regards to all my old friends and a wish for a speedy return to you all. General Sir Ian Hamilton visited us this week, and remembered perfectly his visit to Unley while I was mayor."