• Vera Emily Flower

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    Bega, New South wales

Stories and comments
    • FLOWER, Vera Emily - Staff Nurse, AANS
    • Posted by FrevFord, Wednesday, 25 November 2015

    Born on the 16th December 1886 at Bega, NSW – daughter of Frederick Gregg FLOWER & Mary MARTIN – who married in Sydney in 1881 A pioneer of the Jersey breed on the North Coast of NSW, Frederick established the Gunawah Jersey Stud Farm at Binna Burra (near Bangalow) Mary died in the Bangalow Hospital in July 1912 Frederick died in May 1946 at the Lismore Base Hospital, age 94 Siblings: James Herbert b.1882 Bemboka, NSW – Tpr 357, 7th LH – DOW at sea 25/5/1915 Frederick Harold 1883 – 1964 – marr Jessie B MOORE 16/6/1915; Robert Gregg 1885 – 1964 – marr Evelyn SMALE 21/11/1914; Annie Fisher 1888 – 1977; Eric Sydney 1894 – 1976; Mabel May 1895 – 1897; Alan Lindsay b.1897 Bemboka, NSW – Pte 3675, 5th Pioneers – DOW 29/7/1918 (VB Cem) [AWM photo] Edward William 1900 – 1968 Trained in Nursing at the Coast Hospital, NSW – completing her final year and passing the membership exam for the A.T.N.A in December 1914 WW1: Enlisted 6/7/1915 and embarked 14/7/1915 on the A67 Orsova with Special Reinforcements for the 2nd AGH in Egypt Admitted 4th Auxiliary Hospital, Abassia 13/1/16 with mumps – 2nd AGH 14/1/16 – discharged to duty 4/2/16 Embarked Alexandria 26/3/1916 on the Braemar Castle – disembarked Marseilles 4/4/16 Proceeded to Rouen for duty with the 2nd AGH On leave to England 25/11/16 – 12/12/16 Leave to UK 23/7/17 – resigned appointment due to marriage 8/8/17 Married Foxton William HAYLEY, (Capt, 12th Fld Amb), on the 8/8/1917 at the Parish Church of St Peter, Bayswater, England – with Sister Dickson of the AANS as bridesmaid Only Child: Lindsay Foxton “Digs” b.30/8/1918 London (WW2, RAAF) – married Joyce CALCOTT 1943 Lismore, NSW – daughter Jane b.&d.1945 – died 2/10/1996 NSW (late of St Ives) Vera returned to Australia with her infant son, travelling first class on the family ship Osterley, embarking Liverpool, England on the 10/1/1919 – however, due to a mechanical defect they didn’t actually depart the UK until the 16/1/1919 The Hayley’s settled in Bangalow after the war, and then moved to Lismore in 1927 Vera played golf in the Northern championship in the 1930’s She attended the Anzac Day service in Sydney in 1938 President of the Lismore and District Trained Nurses’ Association – from its inception in 1939 to 1947 when they disbanded Died in hospital on the 11/6/1970 at Lismore, NSW [Most likely buried in the Lismore Cemetery with her husband] Foxton William (Tim) HAYLEY was born 20/3/1880 in Bathurst, NSW – son of (Dr) William Foxton HAYLEY (Bank Manager) & Arabella Wilmot ROTTON – who married 1875 Balranald, NSW Dentist [See Bio & photo in Wellington’s Finest; and link to his Obit in Notes] WW1: Major, Dental Corps – attached to various Units including the 2nd AGH, 12th Field Ambulance Returned to Australia on the Ceramic 25/1/1919 – 14/3/1919 Died 24/8/1953 Lismore, NSW, age 71, and buried in the Lismore Cemetery Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW), Sat 28 Aug 1915 (p.4): Personal Nurse Flower, of Bangalow, has been accepted for nursing service at the front. Her brother was killed at Gallipoli some time ago. Wellington Times (NSW), Thur 23 Aug 1917 (p.6): MARRIAGE AUGUST 8, in London, Capt. FOXTON HAYLEY (12th Australian Field Ambulance, France), to Staff-Sister VERA FLOWER, eldest daughter of Mr F.G. Flower, Gunawah, Binna Burra. The Daily News (Perth, WA), Thur 22 Nov 1917 (p.3): Mainly About People The wedding was celebrated on August 8, at St Peter’s, Bayswater, of Captain Foxton W. Hayley, Australian Field Ambulance, and Sister Vera E. Flower, A.A.N.S. Sister Dickson, A.A.N.S., was bridesmaid, and Lieutenant W.E. Robinson, A.I.F., groomsman, while Major Lethbridge, A.I.F., gave the bride away. It was an entirely Australian ceremony. Chaplain-Captain H.B. Blackwood, on leave from France, was the officiating clergyman, assisted by the Rev. Mr Norman. Solos were rendered by Miss Ethel Williamson (N.S.W.) and Private E. Carr Cameron, A.I.F. Private R. Dalby Scarlett, A.I.F., presided at the organ. A reception was held by Mrs E. Clive-Wilkinson (N.S.W.), aunt of the bridegroom, at Victoria House, 15 Pembridge-square, W. Wellington Times (NSW), Mon 2 Sept 1918 (p.2): BIRTH HAYLEY – In London, the wife of Major Foxton Hayley, a son. Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Fri 16 May 1919 (p.8): ROUND THE RIVERS Mrs Hayley (Sister Vera Flower) was tendered a welcome home at Binna Burra last week and presented with a gold medal brooch (inscribed), together with a chain and a jewel case. Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Tue 3 Jun 1919 (p.3): BINNA BURRA WELCOME TO A HEROINE At Binna Burra on Friday evening, 2nd inst., a large gathering gave a welcome home to Mrs Hayley (nee Sister Vera Flower). The spacious verandah of the factory was screened off for the occasion, and willing hands had lavishly decorated it with palms, flags, etc., the piano being kindly loaned by Mrs H. Johnson. Seating accommodation was provided for about 450 persons at tables laden with choicest edibles and soft drinks, and profusely decorated with beautiful flowers. The function was in banquet form and one which by its success in every direction will long be remembered. Mr W.J. Cra..field, who presided, had on his right the guest of the evening and her husband, Major F. Hayley. Proceedings having opened with the National Anthem, the chairman on behalf of Binna Burra residents extended a very hearty welcome home to Major and Mrs Hayley. ………….. ………………………………………………………………………. Dr (Major) C.C. Corlis, in responding on behalf of the A.M.C., said he had known Mrs Hayley for many years. She was first nursing in Bangalow, then in Sydney, and had volunteered for the war. He met her in Egypt and in France. The doctor went on to recount many experiences on the other side, and asked Mrs Hayley if she remembered the winter of 1916-17 when they had to tramp round that lagoon through mud in all sorts of weather with the temperature below zero, to get to the hospital and attend the wounded. The nurses, he said, had played a heroic part, which endeared them to all whom they came in contact with. He had also met Major Hayley in France, and found he was really a jolly good fellow. ………………………………………………….. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/92992225 Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Sat 13 Aug 1927 (p.9): MR AND MRS HAYLEY FAREWELLED AT BANGALOW BANGALOW, Friday Mr and Mrs F.W. Hayley, who have removed to Lismore, were the guests of honour on Friday evening at a farewell social and presentation, arranged by their many friends and well-wishers at Bangalow. ………………………………………….. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93638231 Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Mon 13 Mar 1939 (p.4): A SISTER’S GOOD-BYE Mrs F.W. Hayley (nee Sister Flower), of Dawson-street, Lismore, writing in the February issue of “Reveille,” tells an incidient that occurred at the outbreak of war in 1914. Mrs Hayley states: “As a young nurse in my last year of training in a big city hospital at the outbreak of war in 1914, I was informed by our assistant Superintendent, doing the rounds one morning, that England would need all my brothers and myself for the war. I was startled, but a few weeks later my eldest and much-loved brother came as a patient to the hospital for a slight operation to make him fit for service. Later he was accepted and became a trooper in the 7th Light Horse Regiment. After some time of training at Liverpool, we were told they were about to leave secretly for service abroad. Soon after I heard a rumour that the 7th Light Horse were moving off, and having no plans for the day – being off duty – I caught a train at once for Liverpool, hoping against hope that I would see my brother again. Being innocent and ignorant of all military rule and order, I approached four or five very important-looking officers in khaki and red and said that as I’d heard the 7th Light Horse were moving, I’d like to see my brother to say good-bye. (Later, on active service myself, I understood their look of surprise at my request). They pretended ignorance of any such news, but after a brief discussion together, they asked me to come in their car with them to Holdsworthy. It was no time before I could see miles of mounted men coming towards us. By scanning the moving mass closely, for what seemed ages, I saw my brother on the outside, quite near our stationary car. As they passed, the kind men with me gave an order for a slight halt and my brother and I said good-bye. I can still see the look of horror, bewilderment and amazement on the faces of the officers in charge of those men when their perfect line was broken and there was a hold up. I have often wondered if any of these men are still living, or any men in the 7th Light Horse who remember this incident. My brother was wounded at Gallipoli and died at sea on the “Soudan,” on his way to Lemnos.” Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Thur 3 Apr 1947 (p.2): Trained Nurses’ Assn. Disbands ……………………………………………………………… Members who spoke expressed regret that the association was disbanding. ……………. The President (Mrs F.W. Hayley) and Treasurer (Mrs A.M. Nowland) were in office since the association was formed. ……………………………… The President (Mrs F.W. Hayley) said the association was formed originally before the war, to work for charity and the hospitals, and eventually to form a social club by which the nurses could keep in touch with each other. …………………………………………….. Sydney Morning Herald, Jun 13, 1970 (p.112): DEATHS HAYLEY, Vera Emily – June 11, 1970, at hospital, late of Dawson Street, Lismore, widow of the late Mr Foxton William (Tim) Hayley, loved mother of Lindsay (Digs), mother-in-law of Lorna and grandmother of Paul. Notes: Vera’s birth registered in 1887 (as Sera in the index) [Brit Birth Index: William F. Hayley born Sept Qtr 1918 Brentford, England (mother’s maiden name, Flower] Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Fri 23 Oct 1936 (p.4): Surprise For Radio Listener Writing to a friend in Lismore, Mrs P. Forsyth, of Rabaul, stated that she was very surprised while tuning in on her radio to hear the announcement “Buy you underwear at S. McLean’s, Lismore.” She found that she had tuned in to 2LM, Lismore, which station she had not known existed. Mrs Forsythe was very interested in her discovery, for during the year she spent several months’ holiday as the guest of Mr and Mrs F.W. Hayley, of Dawson-street, Lismore. During the war years Mrs Hayley and Mrs Forsythe saw active service together as nurses, and the friendship has continued, although Mrs Forsythe’s interests are now centred in Rabaul, where she has two copra plantations. 1937 Photo (golf competition): http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/94638362 Her son’s Wedding 1943: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96427466 Her father’s Obit 1946: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/99117271 More on her father 1935: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/117204493 Her Husband’s Obit 1953: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96401801