• Earle Christmas Grafton Page

Army / Flying Corps
  • No. 3 Australian General Hospital
    Unknown
  • Captain

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    Unknown
  • Birth

    Grafton, NSW, Australia

Stories and comments
    • Earle Christmas Grafton Page
    • Posted by Mapping our Anzacs story, Monday, 4 November 2013

    Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page (1880-1961), politician and surgeon, was born on 8 August 1880 at Grafton, New South Wales, fifth of eleven children of London-born Charles Page, blacksmith and coachbuilder, and his Tasmanian wife Mary Johanna Hadden, née Cox. Harold Hillis and Rodger Clarence George Page were brothers. Page arranged his war carefully so as not to interfere unduly with his political and business affairs. Even before he enlisted in January 1916 he intended, after less than a year overseas as a doctor in the Australian Imperial Force, to return home to swap places with the last remaining member of his Grafton practice. His plan worked admirably. Captain Page spent six months in Egypt, two in England and three at a casualty clearing station in France; and, in March 1917, his claim was accepted that in order to avoid financial ruin he had to return urgently to Australia as his partner had enlisted. Nevertheless, he found time to travel home with Ethel through Canada and the United States of America, inspecting hydro-electric projects there. Back in Grafton by June, Page quickly resumed his political career and began to lobby for support in a bid for the local Federal seat of Cowper. A conscriptionist, he kept his opinions quiet during the 1917 plebiscite, not wishing to lose the confidence of the farmers. In 1918 he ignored requests to report for military duty in Sydney though he participated strongly in recruiting campaigns. That year he was elected mayor of South Grafton, serving till 1920, and he initiated the Nymboida hydro-electric scheme to supply the town with power, a project he opened as Federal treasurer in 1924. On Lyons's death in April 1939 Page became caretaker prime minister for nineteen days while the U.A.P. elected a new leader. He and Richard (Lord) Casey failed to persuade Bruce to return to take office, and (Sir) Robert Menzies, a man with no love for the Country Party, was elected. Having destroyed Hughes in 1922, Page now tried to destroy Menzies. In a carefully prepared philippic he accused Menzies in parliament of cowardice for not having enlisted in World War I and of disloyalty to his leader which had hastened Lyons's death. Such a man, Page argued, was not fit to lead his country, especially as war was again imminent.Page was forced to step down from the leadership in September and never regained it. The Country Party re-entered cabinet in March 1940, and Menzies forgave Page sufficiently to reappoint him minister for commerce in June, but his influence in cabinet was to be much reduced. Australian Dictionary of Biography: http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/page-sir-earle-christmas-grafton-7941

    • Earle Christmas Grafton Page
    • Posted by Mapping our Anzacs story, Wednesday, 20 November 2013

    Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page (1880-1961), politician and surgeon, was born on 8 August 1880 at Grafton, New South Wales, fifth of eleven children of London-born Charles Page, blacksmith and coachbuilder, and his Tasmanian wife Mary Johanna Hadden, nee Cox. Harold Hillis and Rodger Clarence George Page were brothers.Page arranged his war carefully so as not to interfere unduly with his political and business affairs. Even before he enlisted in January 1916 he intended, after less than a year overseas as a doctor in the Australian Imperial Force, to return home to swap places with the last remaining member of his Grafton practice. His plan worked admirably. Captain Page spent six months in Egypt, two in England and three at a casualty clearing station in France; and, in March 1917, his claim was accepted that in order to avoid financial ruin he had to return urgently to Australia as his partner had enlisted. Nevertheless, he found time to travel home with Ethel through Canada and the United States of America, inspecting hydro-electric projects there.Back in Grafton by June, Page quickly resumed his political career and began to lobby for support in a bid for the local Federal seat of Cowper. A conscriptionist, he kept his opinions quiet during the 1917 plebiscite, not wishing to lose the confidence of the farmers. In 1918 he ignored requests to report for military duty in Sydney though he participated strongly in recruiting campaigns. That year he was elected mayor of South Grafton, serving till 1920, and he initiated the Nymboida hydro-electric scheme to supply the town with power, a project he opened as Federal treasurer in 1924.On Lyons's death in April 1939 Page became caretaker prime minister for nineteen days while the U.A.P. elected a new leader. He and Richard (Lord) Casey failed to persuade Bruce to return to take office, and (Sir) Robert Menzies, a man with no love for the Country Party, was elected. Having destroyed Hughes in 1922, Page now tried to destroy Menzies. In a carefully prepared philippic he accused Menzies in parliament of cowardice for not having enlisted in World War I and of disloyalty to his leader which had hastened Lyons's death. Such a man, Page argued, was not fit to lead his country, especially as war was again imminent. Page was forced to step down from the leadership in September and never regained it. The Country Party re-entered cabinet in March 1940, and Menzies forgave Page sufficiently to reappoint him minister for commerce in June, but his influence in cabinet was to be much reduced.Australian Dictionary of Biography: http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/page-sir-earle-christmas-grafton-7941