• Annie Heath

Army / Flying Corps
  • No. 1 Australian General Hospital
  • Australian Army Nursing Service
    Unknown
  • Matron

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  • 1914–1915 Star
  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
  • Birth

    Mount Lofty, Cleland Conservation Park, Cleland, South Australia, Australia

Stories and comments
    • Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 19 January 1910, page 6
    • Posted by Cooloola, Sunday, 19 February 2017

    Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 19 January 1910, page 6The names of the Misses Lavinia Graham and Annie Heath, members of the nursing staff of the Adelaide Hospital, appear in the examination pass list published in the January issue of the "Australian Nurses' Journal" of candidates who were successful at the Central A.T.N.A. examination, held in December last. --------------------------- Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 13 August 1915, page 7 AUSTRALIAN NURSES PRAISED. Melbourne, August 12. The Minister of Defence was this morn-ing appreciative of the fact that recent New Zealand papers contain highly compli-mentary references to Australian nurses in an interview published with Colonel W. G. Will, Assistant Director of Medical Ser-vices, who went away with the New Zea-land Expeditionary Forces. This officer is reported to have said on his return with sick and wounded soldiers:—"The remark-able results in the way of cures of sick and wounded reflect the highest credit, not only on the stamina of the men, but on the work of the Australian nurses, who have been wonderfully attentive, skilled, and thoughtful." When asked "Why Australian nurses?'' Colonel Will said—"Because our own nurses had not arrived from England. The Australian nurses have been worth their weight in gold." Those he specially men-tioned were Sisters A. Heath (matron), M. F. Whipham, H. E. Tair, N. J. Baker, G. Goode, and Staff Nurses M. Stephenson, M. Dalrymple, and McDonald. The work of the Australian nurses was also mentioned in the New Zealand Parlia-ment, where reference was made to the splendid services they had rendered the New Zealand troops. The Prime Minister (Mr. Marsey) declared:—"There is no ques-tion that these nurses have done splendid work for our men. We are going to do our very best to give them every hospitality while they are in New Zealand." ----------------------- Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), Friday 10 September 1915, page 3 MACCLESFIELD. Military Sister Heath, who was in charge of the wounded New Zealand soldiers who recently returned to their own country from Egypt by the steamer Willochra, spent a portion of her well earned holiday at Macclesfield. During her visit Sister Heath gave a most inter-esting address in the Institute on her experiences with the troopship Ascanius, and also of native customs and life in Cairo. At the close of the proceedings a hearty vote of thanks was tendered Sister Heath. A collection amounting to 37/8 was taken up in aid of red cross funds. On the following Monday, Aug. 30th, the lady members of the red cross committee entertained Sister Heath at an afternoon tea in the Institute Hall, Valedictory speeches were made by Mrs. E. Fry (president), Rev. D. McNaughton, and Messrs. R. Troughton, and S. Davis. Sister Heath left on Tuesday to catch a mail boat en route for Cairo, where she will resume her noble work at Heliopolis. ------------------------ Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), Friday 31 August 1917, page 3 THE LATE PTE. H. HEATH. Private Harold Heath, who died of wounds in France on June 3, was the third son of Mr. A. Heath, Macclesfield. He enlisted on September 12, 1914, in the 9th Light Horse, from Angaston. He embarked early in 1915, and arrived in Egypt in March. He volunteered to join the infantry, and arrived at the Darda-nelles at the beginning of May. He was in the trenches until the middle of August, when he was invalided to Malta. He was sent to Wandsworth Hospital, London, and France at the end of September, 1916, where he was in action until his death, at the age of 34 years. Sister Heath, who went with the first contingent from Western Australia, is a sister of the late Private Heath. They met first in Egypt, and later in London, where they spent a week on furlough together. ---------------------- WELCOMED HOME. (1917, November 22). The Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1923), p. 1 (5 P.M. EDITION). Retrieved February 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201915908 ------------------ Decorations for Soldiers, (1917, December 7). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 4 (5 O'CLOCK EDITION.). Retrieved February 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article209776940 ----------------- Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 4 January 1918, page 6 MARRIAGES. WILTON- HEATH.--On the 27th December, 1917, at Christ Church, North Adelaide, by the Rev. G.H.. Jose, M.A , Richard Gladstones, youngest son of Charles Richard Wilton, to Annie, third daughter of the late Edward Heath.

    • HEATH, Annie – Sister, AANS
    • Posted by FrevFord, Saturday, 12 January 2019

    Annie was born on the 18th of March 1880 at Piccadilly (Mount Lofty), SA – the daughter of Edward HEATH and Annie PETERS, who had married in England in1872. Edward who had been a Market Gardener at Mount Lofty, died on the 11/8/1888 at Bugle Ranges after a long struggle with TB, leaving Annie (Snr) with 8 young children. Annie (Snr) was living at Macclesfield in 1914 Siblings: Florence; Edith May b.6/11/1876; Edward John b.17/5/1878; William b.19/9/1881; *Harold b.6/3/1883 – Stud Groom – fiancé, Louie H. GLASTONBURY– WW1: Pte 129, 9th LH / 48th Bn – DOW 3/6/1917 Belgium; Sarah b.3/6/1884; Francis George b.7/9/1886 Trained at the Adelaide Hospital from 1905, and passed her final exam with the Australasian Trained Nurses Association in December 1909 Nursing in Western Australia at the outbreak of war WW1 Service: A member of the Australian Army Nursing Service since 1908, Annie was selected for overseas service, and embarked at Fremantle 31/10/1914 on HMAT A11 Ascanius together with Sister Tessa Rogers and troops of the 11th Battalion – joining Matron Graham and Sister White, together with the troops of the 10th Bn who had boarded in Adelaide. The Ascanius along with the Medic then departed the outer harbour in the early hours of the 2/11/1914 and met up with the fleet of the First Convoy at sea. Disaster almost struck during the voyage between Colombo and Aden, when the Ascanius collided with the Shropshire in the early hours of the morning of the 21/11/1914. Imagine their relief after it was discovered that all the damage was above the waterline, and they could continue safely on their way to Aden for repairs. In Egypt Annie served at the 1st Australian General Hospital (AGH), where following the Gallipoli landing “the first night they received wounded from the front a thousand were landed at once.” “When the first rush of returned wounded came into the hospital where Sister Heath was busy receiving and tending the injured, her fiancée, mortally wounded, passed through her hands. There was no time to shed a tear then – personal grief had to be set aside until hundreds more had been given attention and relief.” She was then one of eight Australian nurses detailed for transport duty to New Zealand on the Willochra, on loan because the NZ nurses had yet to arrive in Egypt. With Annie in charge of the nursing party, they embarked on the 9/6/1915, and arrived at Fremantle 2/7/1915. Continuing on via Hobart, they arrived in Wellington, NZ on the 14/7/1915, and once they handed over their patients, the nurses were on furlough, and were treated to a tour of New Zealand before departing for Australia by the Moeraki on the 12/8/1915. Arriving in Sydney on the 16/8/1915, Annie travelled to South Australia where she spent time with her mother at Macclesfield. Annie and her seven nursing companions then embarked in Sydney on the RMS Omrah on the 28/8/1915 and returned to duty in Egypt with the 1st AGH on the 1/10/1915. On the 18/2/1916 Annie was detailed for duty at No.4 Auxiliary Hospital, Abbassia She returned to the 1st Australian General Hospital 16/3/1916 The 1st AGH crossed to France on the Hospital Ship Salta, arriving Marseilles 5/4/1916, from here they were taken by train to Rouen, arriving on the 12/4/1916 Annie was then detached from the 1st AGH and reported for duty with No.6 General Hospital, Rouen on the 13/4/1916 She arrived in England 21/6/1916 on Sick Leave Was in charge of the Convalescent Home for Australian nurses at St Albans from the 19/7/1916 and promoted to Temporary Head Sister During1916 Annie’s brother Harold was also in England for a time, and they managed to spend a week on furlough together. He then crossed to France in September 1916, where he was wounded on the 2/6/1917 and died the following day. Annie was admitted to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Southall on the 26/7/1917 She was then posted for duty with No.2 Command Depot, Weymouth 31/7/1917 Admitted sick to Southwell Gardens Hospital 27/8/1917, and following the removal of an ovarian cyst Annie was invalided home for a ‘change’ Reverted to Sister 25/9/1917 and returned to Australia on the A30 Borda, embarking 26/9/1917 Discharged (officially) on the 19/1/1918, medically unfit Married Richard Gladstone WILTON on the 27th of December 1917 at Christ Church, Adelaide Richard was born on the 30/10/1892 at Adelaide – the son of Charles Richard and Annie Isabel (nee Gladstone) – Civil Engineer – WW1: Capt, 50th Bn – he also returned to Australia on the A30 Borda 26/9/17-22/11/1917 – having suffered a wound to the left hand, and the loss of his right eye Child: Dorothy Clyve b.25/11/1918 Konetta– marr John Eliot EXCELL 1941 Sth Yarra, Vic (1953: 29 The Eyrie, Eaglemont, Vic) Living at “Waroonga,” Hughes St, North Unley in 1918 Residents of Barmera 1921; moved to Renmark in 1923 Annie was admitted as a member of the Renmark branch of Returned Soldiers’ Association in May 1923 She was also a member of the Renmark Babies’ Welfare Society Committee in 1923 Living at Leabrook, Adelaide (1934) Richard died on the 22/6/1946 following a long illness Annie left Leabrook in July 1951 to live in Eaglemont, Victoria near her daughter and family Annie died on the 28th of January 1953 at the Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria She was cremated at Fawkner Memorial Park the following day The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 31 Aug 1888 (p.4): DEATHS HEATH – On the 11th August, at Bugle Ranges, after a long and painful illness, from phthisis, Edward, the beloved husband of Annie Heath, aged 37 years; leaving a widow and eight children to mourn their loss. Formerly market gardener at Mount Lofty. Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA), Wed 29 Nov 1905 (p.1): ADELAIDE HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS The Executive Council on Wednesday morning made the following appointments in the Adelaide Hospital: – ……………….., Annie Heath, ……………. to be probationer nurses; ………………………. The Daily News (Perth, WA), Mon 20 Dec 1909 (p.5): NEWS AND NOTES Australasian Trained Nurses’ Association – At the recent examinations held on December 7 and 8 by the Western Australian branch of the Australasian Trained Nurses’ Association the following nurses successfully passed the examination for general nursing:– ………………….., Annie Heath, ………………………. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Wed 19 Jan 1910 (p.6): PERSONAL The names of the Misses Lavinia Graham and Annie Heath, members of the nursing staff of the Adelaide Hospital, appear in the examination pass list published in the January issue of the “Australian Nurses’ Journal” of candidates who were successful at the Central A.T.N.A. examination, held in December last. New Zealand Times, 16 Jul 1915 (p.5): NOTES FOR WOMEN THE NURSES’ WORK To the women at the Town Hall yesterday, the little group of nurses who entered the hall after most of the men had arrived were the most intensely interesting people there, for they had been nursing their sons or brothers back to health, those who had relatives among the men, and to others these women had been doing the work which all women at the present time long to do, nursing wounded men back to health and strength. Sir Joseph Ward gave an idea of their work when he said that eighty men had had to be carried on board the Willochra, and only fifteen had had to be carried off. They looked too such a small number, only eight in all, among so many men. These eight nurses who have helped to bring our men safely back to us are Australians. They were under the charge of Sister Heath, of South Australia, who was one of the first nurses to go to Egypt, having left Australia with the first troopships, which took the Australians to Egypt, so that she has been on active service already eight months or more. All of the nurses have been in Egypt for some months, and they were loaned to the New Zealand authorities to come out in the Willochra because they needed a rest from the work in Egypt. To take charge of severely wounded men on a long voyage being regarded as a rest gives one some idea of the tremendous work that must have been done in the hospitals in Egypt. The Sisters say they were busy from the time of their landing in Egypt, when they were stationed at different hospitals, Heliopolis, Mena House, No.1 Hospital at Alexandria and others. A good many pneumonia cases were in hospital and also measles, but, thanks to inoculation, very little enteric fever. ………………………………………… In the Base Hospital at Alexandria, where Sister Heath was stationed, the first night they received wounded from the front a thousand were landed at once. This will give a faint conception of what they work was, and these were all seriously wounded cases. Nurses and orderlies were going day and night, and the nurses say now that they don’t know how they kept going. Only, like the men themselves, the work was there to be done, and they did it. Many of these Australian nurses were on duty day and night for days together, with only a hurried sleep at odd times. They speak with great pride of the way in which the Australians distinguished themselves in their first landing, and they give great praise also to the New Zealanders. Their patients on the Willochra have endeared themselves greatly to their hearts. Every man on board speaks with pride and affection of the nurses, and to see the way in which they defer to them, on a visit to the ship, was delightful. The Willochra is a makeshift hospital ship, and nurses and men have had to make do with many inconveniences, especially in the improvised operating room, but all were most cheerful about it, and the wards, very bare and comfortless places after a real hospital ship, housed the jolliest lot of patients possible. The nurses go with the ship to Dunedin, and then proceed to Sydney, whence they will return to Egypt. ……………….. It must have been gratifying to the nurses to receive the thanks of their patients’ relatives yesterday. Hardly a woman who had welcomed back her son or brother but came up to the Sisters to say the “thank you” for their care. But their greatest pride must be in the fact that they had not a single death on board, although they had over two hundred men, many seriously wounded. The thanks of the New Zealand mothers are indeed due to the brave Australian women who have helped bring their sons safely back to them. https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTIM19150716.2.25?query=sister%20heath&phrase=2&start_date=01-07-1915&end_date=31-10-1915&snippet=true Lake Wakatip Mail, 27 Jul 1915 (p.4): THE WILLOCHRA NURSES PAY A VISIT TO QUEENSTOWN ………………………………… During the stay of the Australian nurses, our representative sought and was courteously granted a short interview with Sister Heath. Questioned in relation to the circumstances which led up to their association with the New Zealand boys, Sister Heath stated that the eight sisters, which came to New Zealand, formed part of a complement of 24 sisters which were despatched with the first main expeditionary force from the Commonwealth of Australia. …………….. The eight sisters, one of whom was recalled to Australia after her arrival in the Dominion, are at present on furlough and will return to the front either with New Zealand or Australian troops. ………………….. The Willochra’s complement of wounded soldiers totaled 281. In this lot there were 80 stretcher cases when the vessel started. They improved wonderfully on the voyage out, so that on landing at Wellington there were only 15 stretcher cases. ……………… https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LWM19150727.2.20?query=sister%20heath&phrase=2&start_date=01-07-1915&end_date=31-10-1915&snippet=true Otago Daily Times (NZ), 28 Jul 1915 (p.9): THE AUSTRALIAN SISTERS TO THE EDITOR SIR, – May I ask for your valued assistance towards helping me, on behalf of the Australian nursing sisters, to return our very warmest thanks for the more than generous kindness we have received at the hands of the citizens of Dunedin since our arrival. Before reaching New Zealand we had been told something as to what reception we should meet with here, but the realization has far exceeded our anticipations, leaving us at a loss to express how much we have appreciated the good times we have enjoyed. It not being possible to write personal letters, my fellow nurses ask me to convey, through you, to one and all who have been so good to us our most grateful thanks. We really feel as if we were parting with very old friends, and we leave with much regret, consoled with the hope that on some future occasion we may be so fortunate as to visit Dunedin again. – I am, etc., ANNIE HEATH, Matron, Australian Army Nursing Service, Australian Imperial Forces. Dunedin, July 26 New Zealand Herald, 9 Aug 1915 (p.5): AUSTRALIAN NURSES ARRIVAL IN AUCKLAND …………………………………………….. The seven nurses in the party come from different parts of Australia, and were stationed at a military hospital at Heliopolis before making the trip to New Zealand. Their names are: Sisters A. Heath, M. Whitham [sic], H. Witham [?], H. Tait, G. Good, M. Stevenson, M. Baker, and J. McDonald. Sister Heath is in charge of the party. …………………… https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19150809.2.37?query=sister%20heath&phrase=2&start_date=01-07-1915&end_date=31-10-1915&snippet=true [Mary Frances WHIPHAM, Helen Elizabeth TAIT, Gertrude GOOD, Margaret STEVENSON, Maud Isabel BAKER, Janet McDONALD] Another list shows: Sisters A. Heath (matron), M.F. Whipham (assistant matron), H.E. Tait, W.J. Baker [?], G. Good; staff nurses, M. Stevenson, M. Dalrymple, and McDonald. https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SUNCH19150719.2.21?query=willochra%20heath&start_date=01-06-1915&end_date=31-12-1915&snippet=true [Marion DALRYMPLE – was recalled to Australia, and didn’t join the tour around NZ] Evening Post (NZ), 13 Aug 1915 (p.9): WOMEN IN PRINT The seven Australian nurses, who left yesterday by the Moeraki for Sydney, en route to Egypt, were farewelled by a large number of friends, including Mr B. Wilson, who has been in charge of their tour of the North Island, and Lady Ward. Several officers who came out in charge of the men on the Willochra were also present, and all expressed the hope of meeting again soon in Egypt. Sister Heath, matron in charge, was presented with a bouquet of violets and freesias, and the nurses all received many parting gifts. Leader (Melb, Vic), Sat 14 Aug 1915 (p.49): AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSES “WORTH THEIR WEIGHT IN GOLD” Australian army nurses have won high praise in New Zealand. The Minister of Defence on Thursday stated that he had received several press cuttings from New Zealand referring to the Australian nurses. Colonel W.G. Will, Assistant Director of Medical Services, in an interview, for instance, stated that remarkable results were being obtained in the curing of both sick and wounded soldiers at the front. This reflected credit not only upon the stamina of the men, but upon the work of the Australian nurses, who had been wonderfully attentive and thoughtful. Colonel Will went on to explain that Australian nurses were looking after New Zealanders, as the New Zealand nurses had not then arrived from England. The Australian nurses, he added, were worth their weight in gold. Certain nurses were mentioned by name in the cuttings. They were: – Sister A. Heath, matron; ……………………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/90191476 The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW), Tue 17 Aug 1915 (p.7): AUSTRALIAN NURSES There arrived in Sydney yesterday by the Moeraki eight Australian nurses – Sisters Heath, Whiphan, Tait, Good, Baker, Dalrymple, McDonald, and Stephenson. Two of them belonged to South Australia, two to Brisbane, and four to Melbourne. These nurses, who had nine months’ strenuous work in the Australian Hospital in Egypt, were sent from there to New Zealand in charge of wounded soldiers, and incidentally to have a rest after their trying work in Egypt. While in New Zealand they were the guests of the Government, and had a royal time. The Governor of New Zealand and Lady Liverpool gave a reception in their honor, as also did the Lord Mayor and the Lady Mayoress. A Ministerial tea was also tendered them, at which Lord and Lady Liverpool were invited to meet them. The nurses were in Egypt when the great rush of wounded arrived in hundreds daily from the Dardanelles. In one of the hospitals that held 1500 patients there were 16 nurses and 16 orderlies to attend to the wounded, and sometimes a sister would be in charge of 62 beds. At the time the Australian nurses left Cairo there were not enough nurses or doctors; but since then the later contingent of New Zealand nurses would have arrived, so the situation would be somewhat relieved. Mr W.R. Blow (New Zealand Government Agent in Sydney) met the nurses on arrival here, and they proceeded by last night’s mail train to Melbourne. They will return to Egypt by a boat leaving Sydney on August 28. The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 28 Aug 1915 (p.15): OMRAH, FOR LONDON The R.M.S. Omrah will leave to-day from the Orient Co.’s wharf, Circular Quay, at noon, for London, via ports. The following are her passengers: – Nurse Baker, Nurse Dalrymple, Nurse Good, Nurse Heath, Nurse McDonald, Nurse Stevenson, Nurse Tait, Nurse Whipham, ……………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/15610128 Critic (Adelaide, SA), Wed 8 Sept 1915 (p.24): At the Sign of Four O The principal thought at present is how we can make things bright for those in the fighting line, trenches and hospitals for Christmas, and an especial appeal is being made for the South Australian Army nurses. Very few people other than their personal friends have any idea what strenuous times these women are passing through. Sister Heath, one of the first to leave for the front, the sister in charge of the Australian nurses who brought back New Zealand’s wounded heroes recently, left by the mailboat last week, returning to Egypt. Her experience had been a sad one. On the eve of marriage, when war broke out, as an army nurse she was called to duty, and the trousseau had to be set aside and the army outfit procured. Her future husband thereupon enlisted, to be near her. When the first rush of returned wounded came into the hospital where Sister Heath was busy receiving and tending the injured, her fiancée, mortally wounded, passed through her hands. There was no time to shed a tear then – personal grief had to be set aside until hundreds more had been given attention and relief. Sister Heath could not speak too highly of the generous, open-handed hospitality shown them in New Zealand. It seemed as though Government and public alike could not do enough for them. They were taken on a grand tour and shown everything – first-class accommodation in trains, hotels, wherever they went, and nothing to pay. When they were taking a long train journey through country districts, at every station along the route there would be a deputation of ladies with flowers and hampers of tea, sandwiches and cake, all daintily put up for the refreshment of the nurses on the journey. Upon one occasion, sister said “they had been presented at different stations with seven such hampers in one morning.” Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA), Thur 9 Sept 1915 (p.3): MACCLESFIELD Sept 7th Military Sister Heath, who was in charge of the wounded New Zealand soldiers who recently returned to their own country from Egypt by the steamer Willochra, spent a portion of her well-earned holiday at Macclesfield. During her visit Sister Heath gave a most interesting address in the Institute on her experiences with the troopship Ascanius, and also of native customs and life in Cairo. At the close of the proceedings a hearty vote of thanks was tendered Sister Heath. A collection amounting to 37/8 was taken up in aid of red cross funds. On the following Monday, Aug 30th, the lady members of the red cross committee entertained Sister Heath at an afternoon tea in the Institute Hall. Valedictory speeches were made by Mrs E. Fry (president), Rev D. McNaughton, and Messrs R. Troughton, and S. Davis. Sister Heath left on Tuesday to catch a mail boat en route for Cairo, where she will resume her noble work at Heliopolis. Weekly Times (Vic), Sat 5 May 1917 (p.13): For Australian Nurses In England Mr John McIlwraith has placed his beautiful mansion home at St Albans at the disposal of Australian army nurses on furlough. The house is run on the same lines as if the owner’s family were in occupation, the domestic staff has been retained to look after the nurses, and there is also a chauffeur to take them for a spin in a luxuriously appointed motor-car if they feel inclined. Sister Heath, who left Australia with the first nursing unit, is in charge. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Sat 25 Aug 1917 (p.10): THE ROLL OF HONOR THE LATE PRIVATE H. HEATH Private Harold Heath, who died of wounds in France on June 3, was the third son of Mrs A. Heath, of Macclesfield, and the late Edward Heath, formerly of Mount Lofty and Bugle Ranges. …………………………… Sister Heath, who went with the first contingent from Western Australia, was a sister of the late Private Heath. They met in Egypt, and later in London, where they spent a week on furlough together. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/5547183?searchTerm The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 23 Nov 1917 (p.9): FROM THE BATTLE FRONT – MORE SOLDIERS RETURNED ………………………………………………………… Captain R.G. Wilton, of the 50th Battalion, who lost an eye at the battle of Messines, was the only officer who arrived. Sister A. Heath, of the 1st AGH, who left with the 1st Division, returned invalided, after service in Egypt, France, and England. Before proceeding to the motor cars, which conveyed them to Keswick by the usual route through the principal streets, the men paid a tribute of cheers to Sister Heath. ……… Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA), Sat 8 Dec 1917 (p.4): SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED The Cheer-Up Society entertained at luncheon the soldiers and veterans who were on parade. ……………………….. The Commandant paid a tribute to the war work of the women. Fine work had been accomplished by Sister Heath, who had just returned from the front. …………… Observer (Adelaide, SA), Sat 5 Jan 1918 (p.23): MARRIAGES WILTON – HEATH – On the 27th December, at Christ Church, by the Rev. G.H. Jose, M.A., Richard Gladstone, youngest son of Charles Richard Wilton, to Annie, third daughter of the late Edward Heath. The Journal (Adelaide, SA), Thur 28 Nov 1918 (p.1): BIRTHS WILTON – On the 25th November, at Konetta, to Capt. and Mrs R.G. Wilton, “Waroonga,” Hughes street, North Unley – a daughter (Dorothy Clyve). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Sat 26 Jul 1919 (p.7): PERSONAL Mr R.G. Wilton, who has been appointed assistant engineer in the Irrigation and Reclamation Works Department, was at Prince Alfred College for ten years before proceeding to the University, …………………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5608875 Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA), Fri 11 May 1923 (p.11): RETURNED SOLDIERS ASSOCIATION MEETING OF RENMARK BRANCH A meeting of the Renmark branch of Returned Soldiers’ Association was held in the club room on Monday night, …………….. Mrs R.G. Wilton (a former nurse with the A.I.F.) and Messrs A.G. Smith, H.H. Hilston and W.A. Williams were admitted as members. ……………… Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA), Fri 22 Jun 1923 (p.10): BABIES’ WELFARE SOCIETY APPLICATION TO HOTEL COMMITTEE At the last meeting of the Renmark Hotel Committee a deputation representing the committee of the Babies’ Welfare Society was received. Mrs W.A. Robertson and Mrs R.G. Wilton represented the society and asked for financial assistance from the Hotel committee. The deputationists explained that the object of the society was to maintain a nurse to assist and instruct mothers in the care of their infants. …………… In reply to Mr J.W. Johnson Mrs Wilton stated that the central organization had considered the question of diversion of the baby bonus to the upkeep of the institution, but as a branch they had not considered it locally. …………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/109326689 Chronicle (Adelaide, SA), Thur 30 Dec 1937 (p.52): SOCIAL EVENTS Recuperating At Mount Lofty – Mrs R.G. Wilton, who has been in ill-health for some months, is now recuperating at the Mount Lofty Golf Club, which is set so charmingly in one of the prettiest parts of the hills. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Wed 3 Dec 1941 (p.12): Lady Kitty Hears Mr and Mrs R.G. Wilton, of Leabrook, and Miss Clyve Wilton will leave for Melbourne on Friday and stay at Chevron, St Kilda road. At 4.30 p.m. next Wednesday Miss Wilton will be married at Christ Church, South Yarra, to Mr John Eliot Excell, only son of Mr W.A. Excell, of Blackwood, and the late Mrs Excell. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Mon 24 Jun 1946 (p.6): DEATH OF MR R.G. WILTON Was Engineer For Water Supply Mr R.G. Wilton, who was deputy Engineer-in-Chief and Engineer for Water Supply, died in a private hospital yesterday morning after a long illness. He had been away from his department for the past three months. ………………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/35701156 The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Mon 24 Jun 1946 (p.14): DEATHS WILTON – On June 22, Richard Gladstones, dearly loved husband of Annie Wilton, of 24 Stanley street, Leabrook, and father of Clyve (Mrs J.E. Excell). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Tue 23 Jul 1946 (p.4): LADY KITTY Writes About PEOPLE Mr and Mrs J.E. Excell and their two girls who have been staying for six weeks with Mrs Excell’s mother, Mrs R.G. Wilton, at Leabrook, returned by car on Sunday to their home at Hughesdale, Victoria. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Thur 15 Aug 1946 (p.4): ABOUT PEOPLE Mrs R.G. Wilton, of Leabrook, returned from Melbourne by plane yesterday. She had been staying at Chevron, St Kilda road, as the guest of Dr and Mrs Ralph Noble, of Cambridge, old friends of Mrs Wilton, who recently arrived by Dutch plane. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Thur 12 Aug 1948 (p.5): About People Mrs R.G. Wilton has returned to Leabrook from a visit of several months to her daughter, Mrs J.E. Excell, at Eaglemont, Victoria. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Tue 10 Oct 1950 (p.10): About People Mrs R.G. Wilton returned to Leabrook yesterday after a visit of several weeks to her son-in-law and daughter, Mr and Mrs J. Excell, at Eaglemont, Victoria. While there Mrs Wilton attended the wedding of Miss Dorothea Dixon, of Melbourne, with Mr Douglas Robertson, of Millswood. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 5 Jan 1951 (p.10): About People Mr and Mrs J.E. Excell and their three daughters returned by car to their home at Eaglemont, Victoria, yesterday. They came to SA to see Mrs Excell’s mother Mrs R.G. Wilton, and also Mr Excell’s father and sister, with whom they stayed at Belair. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Tue 10 Jul 1951 (p.10): About People FOR VICTORIA To say good-bye to old SA friends, Mrs. R.G. Wilton, from Leabrook, will entertain at afternoon tea tomorrow. She will leave on July 19 by the Melbourne express for The Eyrie, Eaglemont, Victoria, where her son-in-law and daughter, Mr and Mrs J.E. Excell, live. Later, Mrs Wilton plans to have a flat near them. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Thur 29 Jan 1953 (p.13): DEATHS WILTON, Annie – On January 28, at Repatriation Hospital, Heidelberg, loving wife of the late Richard G. Wilton, and dearly loved mother of Clyve (Mrs J.E. Excell, 29 The Eyrie, Eaglemont). FUNERAL NOTICES WILTON – The Funeral of the Late Mrs ANNIE WILTON will leave Taylor’s chapel, 81 Heidelberg road, Ivanhoe, THIS DAY (Thursday), at 11 am, for the Melbourne Crematorium, Fawkner. Notes: Virtual War Memorial: https://vwma.org.au/explore/people/655976 Richard Wilton: https://vwma.org.au/explore/people/270906 Photo of Clyve 1936: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/131880693 Letter from Harold to friends 1915: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/209983797 Was this her?: The Collie Miner (WA), Sat 23 Apr 1910 (p.3): In Social Swim Nurse Heath, erstwhile of the Boulder Mines Hospital, who was assisting Matron Hopkins at the Collie Government Hospital last month, left Collie a fortnight ago and sailed from Fremantle to visit relatives in the Eastern States last Saturday.