• George Holt Henderson Smith

Army / Flying Corps
  • 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
  • 3rd Brigade
  • 2nd Lieutenant

To select multiple units, brigades and ranks, hold the ctrl or shift key on your keyboard and select your options

  • 1914–1915 Star
  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
  • Birth

    Adelaide CBD, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia

  • Enlistment - WW1

    Midland, Western Australia, Australia

Stories and comments
    • George Holt Henderson Smith - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Sunday, 22 March 2015

    Profile images from the National Library of Australia. Lieutenant G. H. Henderson Smith. Western Mail Friday 11 June 1915. Lieutenant G. H. Henderson Smith. Western Mail Saturday 25 December 1915. Follow the links to Australian War Memorial, State Library of W.A., University of N.S.W., and NLA `Trove` websites to view the images and other articles as they appeared in the newspapers of the day.

    • George Holt Henderson Smith - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Sunday, 22 March 2015

    Personal. By direction of the Minister for Defence Colonel Bruche, the Western Australian District Commandant, has conveyed the deep regret and sympathy of their Majesties the King and Queen, of the Commonwealth Government, and the State Governor to Mr. R. Henderson Smith, in the loss which he and the Army has sustained by the death of his son Lieutenant G. H. Henderson Smith, who was killed at the Dardanelles. Western Mail Friday 11 June 1915.

    • George Holt Henderson Smith - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Sunday, 22 March 2015

    Lieutenant G. H. Henderson Smith. Lieutenant George Holt Henderson Smith whose photograph appears among our illustrations, is the son of Mr. Henderson Smith, local director of D. and W. Murray, and was killed in action at the Dardanelles on May 31. The deceased officer was only 20 years of age, having been born at Malvern, Adelaide, in May, 1895. He was educated at Unley Public School, Adelaide, and also at Neutral Bay, Sydney, and the Sydney Grammar School. He served with the Senior Cadet Corps of the Sydney Grammar School, and after coming to Western Australia in 1912, was both in the senior cadets and citizen forces, latterly in the machine gun section, 86th Infantry. He joined the first Australian Imperial Force in August last, and sailed with the machine gun section of the 11th Battalion, in the Ascanius on November 2. He was stationed in the Mena Encampment, Egypt, with the 1st Division, and with his battalion took part in the attack on the Gallipoli Peninsula on April 25. He was subsequently promoted to the rank of lieutenant. Western Mail Friday 11 June1915.

    • George Holt Henderson Smith - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Sunday, 22 March 2015

    Killed In Action - Lieutenant Holt Henderson Smith. Among the many fine young fellows from W.A. who are finding their graves on the Gallipoli Peninsula none gave greater promise of proving his prowess in the fight for right than Lieut. G. Holt Henderson-Smith. Although only 20 years of age, he had had some experience in cadet training, and on the outbreak of the war he enlisted and was No. 1 in the machine-gun section of the 11th Battalion. He left with the first expeditionary forces, went through the training in Egypt, and took part in the now famous landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The full account of his valorous actions is not yet to hand, but it is known that he was promoted from the ranks on the field and was appointed lieutenant. Private Chris. Forrest, in a letter to his mother, of Osborne, mentions an act of gallantry by Lieut. Henderson Smith (then a private). Private Forrest was hit in the shoulder, and he says:- “Monday morning was just as bad, and at about 9 a.m. they got me in the right shoulder, which finished me as far as fighting was concerned. Henderson-Smith was with me at the time, and with a good deal of risk to himself from bullets, he got me out from the firing line-down to the ambulance people” Corporal Fred. Murphy, of the machine-gun section, also refers in a long and interesting letter to the fallen officer's work in the fighting line, and estimates that in the great action after landing “Smith and Walther must have, accounted for six hundred or seven hundred Turks' between them.” There is no doubt the young soldier was fighting, valiantly for the Empire and Australia when he met with his fate. His father, Mr. E. Henderson Smith (local director of D. and W. Murray, Ltd.), with whom everyone will sympathise, has received a letter from the Commandant, stating that Lieut. Henderson-Smith was killed in action on May 31 and adding: - “ I am directed by the Minister to convey the deep regret and sympathy of The Majesties the King and Queen and the Commonwealth Government in the loss you and the army have sustained by the loss of your son. His Excellency the Governor, Major-General Sir. Harry Barron, K.C.M.G., C. V.O., also desires me to express his deep sympathy” Sunday Times Sunday 13 June 1915.

    • George Holt Henderson Smith - 11th Australian Infantry Battalion
    • Posted by blacksmith, Sunday, 22 March 2015

    Perth Prattle. A "Bulletin" writer pays a well deserved tribute to a fine young Australian. A likeable youngster, the lieutenant son of Henderson Smith, who used to manage D. and W. Murray's, wholesale house in Sydney, fills a grave in one of the long lines at Gallipoli. When father left Sydney he went to look to the Westralian side of the business, and the boy (who had got his first taste of soldiering with the Sydney Grammar Cadets) joined in Perth. He told of his own luck - the boat with his machine-gun section was knocked to bits, and there were only he and another to scramble ashore with his precious weapon. Others told of his pluck - among them a battered private whom he took down to shelter under fire." "The Sunday Times" published a portrait of the gallant young Henderson Smith a few weeks ago, together with a short account of his life and premature death. Scores of soldiers have referred in terms of deep admiration to the gallant youth, and his untimely death is deeply mourned. Sunday Times Sunday 1 August 1915.