• Edith Evelyn Hough

Army / Flying Corps
  • Australian Army Nursing Service
    Unknown
    Unknown

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  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
  • Birth

    Busselton, WA, Australia

  • Enlistment - WW1

    Fremantle, WA, Australia

Stories and comments
    • HOUGH, Edith Evelyn - Staff Nurse, AANS
    • Posted by FrevFord, Monday, 29 February 2016

    Born in 1894 at Busselton, WA – the daughter of Christopher James HOUGH and Isabella Ann McCONNELL (of Mt Lawley, WA) – who married in Victoria in 1885 Christopher, who was a partner in a Saw-milling business near Pinjarra, died of Typhoid Fever at Perth in 1914, and Isabella died 30/7/1947 Siblings: Mabel Louisa b.1887 Augusta (Mrs S Davis); Leonard Irwin b.1889 Augusta (Pte 1342, 4th Fld Amb / 13th FAB – RTA 4/5/1917); Christopher Leslie b.1891 Busselton (1246, 10th LH / 2nd Anzac LH – KIA 18/8/16 Pozieres); Rod; Mena b.1896 Busselton; Jean (Mrs E. Western); Malcolm Religion: Church of England Trained in nursing at Perth Children’s Hospital for 3 years Member of the Australasian Trained Nurses’ Association WW1: Edith joined the Australian Army Nursing Service at the 8th Australian General Hospital (AGH), Fremantle on the 21/8/1917, and embarked on the 23/11/1917 on SS Canberra with the 14th AGH for Egypt, where she was attached for duty on the 21/12/1917 at Abbassia Admitted to hospital at Port Said with Bronchitis 27/2/1918 – 3/3/1918 Joined the Convalescent Home at Alexandria 12/6/1918, before being admitted to hospital in Port Said with Anaemia 20/6/1918 – 26/6/1918 Embarked at Port Said for the UK 27/12/1918 on Kasir-I-Hind – disembarking Southampton 7/1/19 and attached to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital (AAH), Harefield Resigned 16/1/1919 due to marriage Married Otto Ludwig VETTER, (Capt, RAF) on the 10th of January 1919 at St Andrew’s, Wells Street, London (reg Marylebone), England The couple returned to Australia together, arriving back in Perth at the end of August 1919 Children (2): John Irwin b. 29/6/1920 at Miss Harvey’s Hospital, Perth – WW2: RAAF, Flight Sgt, 42 Sqn – POW – d.6/2/1945 Java; Mary (Mrs C.D. Cowan) The were living at 76 Labouchere road, South Perth in 1925 (housewife and automobile engineer); and 91 Esplanade, South Perth 1954 (as above) Applied for Repat in 1959 Edith died on the 8th of August 1972 in Sth Perth, aged 76 Cremated at Karrakatta Cemetery and her ashes taken by Funeral Director Otto was born on the 10th of April 1883 at Grafton, NSW – the son of Otto (d.1938) and Lynna (Lena) Sisters: Mrs F.J. Becher (of Harvey); Mrs J.T. McMahon (of Brisbane) Employed with the the Austin Motor Co., Birmingham in 1900 Dissolved his partnership “Vetter and Noel”, Perth (Motor Engineers etc) in April 1916 – leaving Noel to run it alone – re-took over the business (17/10/1919) on his return to Australia WW1: Embarked 3/7/1916 on the Medina for England to join the Royal Flying Corps "Whilst waiting for my commission I rejoined my old firm, The Austin Motor Co., Birmingham." "On being called up I went to Reading for a course of instruction in aero engines, airplanes, wireless telegraphy, machine guns, photography, theory of flight, and other subjects. On account of being above the age limit for pilots I was sent to the observation balloons, of which I knew next to nothing, and had the wind put up by others who told me dreadful tales of the risks of ballooning. I did a six weeks’ course of instruction at Roehampton, which included six trips in a free balloon, the last trip solo." "After leaving Roehampton I was sent to Lydd, in Kent, where there was a big artillery camp, for practical work in observation, map reading, and shooting at targets. Whilst at Lydd a call was made for volunteers for a parachute descent in the presence of Lord French, who was reviewing the school of instruction. Unluckily, I was the one chosen for the work. …………………… On account of the bad packing, my parachute was only partially opened out, and as a result I came to earth in record time and got a considerable bump." "My next descent was on June 10, 1917, three days after Messines. The Red Devil, Baron Richthofen, was abroad with his circus, and brought down six of the 13 balloons we had up that day in a few minutes. I will say that the German flyers were very sporting at that time, as they always refrained from firing at the observers. As soon as the observer heard the bullet rip his balloon he jumped straight over and went down." "Most of my observation work in France was done in connection with French and Belgian artillery." 2nd Lieut, RFC (Special Reserve) Observation Balloon Section: http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-on-land/73-weapons-equipment-uniforms/313-ob-bal-west.html [see also Chapter 2 of “Baling Out” by R. Jackson] Capt, RAF Awarded Croix de Guerre (silver star) Apr 1919 Vetter and Co Auto Engineers – O.L. Vetter inventor of improved car parts Otto died on the 8th of September 1968 in Perth, WA, aged 85 (his ashes were taken by Funeral Director from Karrakatta Cemetery) The Daily News (Perth, WA), Tue 4 Jul 1916 (p.3): Mainly About People Among the passengers who sailed for England last night by the Medina were …………. …and Mr O. Vetter. Cairns Post (Qld), Mon 9 Jul 1917 (p.4): A Flying Man’s Letter Lt O. Vetter, whose father lives at Peeramon, and who went to England to qualify for a commission in the Royal Flying Corps, writes to his father as follows: “Just a line – am in the thick of it, having a very fast time, plenty of noise and lightning and excitement. But we are comparatively safe compared to the infantry, we have a much better time, live well and very comfortable, two in a tent. We do about four hours in the air each day. It’s nervy work when the Hun planes are about, but otherwise it’s very interesting. We see all the trenches and away back in the German lines. We fire about 20 shells to the German’s one. I went into a famous town a few hundred yards from the German lines, and had a hell of a time, and the nearest thing was a 6-inch shell burst just alongside the car, splashes of mud and gravel all over us, too close to be pleasant. The weather is lovely. Very few Australians in this place. Hope you are well and doing O.K.” Flight Magazine 23/1/1919: PERSONALS Married Capt O.L. VETTER, R.A.F., was married on January 10, at St Andrew’s, Wells Street, London, to Sister EDITH EVELYN HOUGH, 14th Australian Hospital, Egypt, daughter of the late CHRISTOPHER JAMES HOUGH, of Perth, West Australia. The West Australian (Perth, WA), Sat 1 Feb 1919 (p.8): SOCIAL The many friends of Nurse Edith Hough will be interested to know that her mother received a cable to say that she was married in England on January 26 to Captain Vetter, of the Royal Air Force. She is the second daughter of the late C.J. Hough. Flight, Apr 10, 1919 (p.475): HONOURS It was announced in the London Gazette on April 5 that the King has been pleased to confer the following rewards on officers and other ranks of the Royal Air Force in recognition of gallantry in flying operations against the enemy: - Croix de Guerre ……………………………………………..; Lieut (A. Capt) O.L. Vetter (with Silver Star); ….. The Daily News (Perth, WA), Fri 22 Aug 1919 (p.3): Mainly About People Mrs Hough, of Mt Lawley, has received word from her daughter, Edith, who left here with the A.I.F. nearly two years ago. Sister Hough was attached to the 14th Australian Hospital, Egypt, until the armistice was signed, when she went to England and was married to Captain Vetter, of the R.A.F., who was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre and French Croix de Guerre, while on active service. Captain and Mrs Vetter expect to arrive in the West by the trans train next week. The Daily News (Perth, WA), Sat 30 Aug 1919 (p.3): Mainly About People Mrs Hough has received word that her daughter, Mrs O. Vetters, and her husband, Captain Otto Vetters, will arrive in Perth by the transcontinental express to-morrow after service abroad. Mrs Vetters was Sister Edith Hough, of 14th AGH, Egypt, and Capt Vetters has been serving with the balloon air force. Cairns Post (Qld), Thur 5 Feb 1920 (p.3): CAPTAIN VETTER’S RETURN – EXPERIENCES OF A BALLOON OBSERVER A SUDDEN DESCENT – THE RED DEVIL – AMONG THE ENGLISH MOTOR FACTORIES Captain Vetter, who is now carrying on the motor repair business formerly conducted by Mr A.J. Noel, had some interesting experiences abroad during the war. Chatting with a representative of “The Motorist and Wheelman,” our returned friend gave the following account of his experiences: - “On selling out my interest to Mr A.J. Noel early in 1916 I proceeded to the Eastern States to enlist in the Australian Flying Corps, but was informed that only officers of the Citizen Forces were being enrolled, so I decided to proceed to England and join the Royal Air Force. Whilst waiting for my commission I rejoined my old firm, The Austin Motor Co., Birmingham. When last with them in 1900, they employed about 1500 persons, all told, but owing to the demand for munitions, and being under Government control, the number of persons increased to approximately 15,000. Huge buildings laid out on the most up-to-date methods were rushed up, a railway siding was installed for the employees, and the latest lathes for quick production installed. At the present time the Austin Co. are the most up-to-date engineering establishment in England. I was employed building airplane engines, the system of payment being wages and bonus; no person earned less than the authorized wage, and most of those employed earned more. My task was to strip down an airplane engine 120 h.p. R.A.F. air-cooled engine, after it had been on the test bench for four hours, examine every part of the engine, rectify faults, rebuild it, and see it through its final test. I might state that the average time to do this was about nine hours. Going some, when you take into consideration the number of parts in an eight-cylinder engine and the accuracy required. All work was inspected by an officer of the aerial inspection department. “On being called up I went to Reading for a course of instruction in aero engines, airplanes, wireless telegraphy, machine guns, photography, theory of flight, and other subjects. On account of being above the age limit for pilots I was sent to the observation balloons, of which I knew next to nothing, and had the wind put up by others who told me dreadful tales of the risks of ballooning. “I did a six weeks’ course of instruction at Roehampton, which included six trips in a free balloon, the last trip solo. They were the most enjoyable trips I’ve had. Drifting above the clouds is the most glorious sensation one could wish. After leaving Roehampton I was sent to Lydd, in Kent, the place lyddite gets its name from, where there was a big artillery camp, for practical work in observation, map reading, and shooting at targets. “Whilst at Lydd a call was made for volunteers for a parachute descent in the presence of Lord French, who was reviewing the school of instruction. Unluckily, I was the one chosen for the work. The packing of parachutes was not so skilfully done in those days (February 1917) as it is now. The parachute I had to use was not by any means well packed, as events showed. The parachute was packed, as usual, in a case at the side of the basket. When the operator jumps over his weight frees the parachute from the case, and the headlong rush downwards is supposed to fill its folds. On account of the bad packing, my parachute was only partially opened out, and as a result I came to earth in record time and got a considerable bump. As a result of this misadventure I always experienced a rather unpleasant feeling when I had to jump out afterwards. Lord French came and sympathized with me, but congratulated me on doing one of the first jumps at Lydd. “My next descent was on June 10, 1917, three days after Messines. The Red Devil, Baron Richthofen, was abroad with his circus, and brought down six of the 13 balloons we had up that day in a few minutes. I will say that the German flyers were very sporting at that time, as they always refrained from firing at the observers. As soon as the observer heard the bullet rip his balloon he jumped straight over and went down. I have seen a German flyer after downing three machies, thread his way between the parachutes and make no effort to fire. The balloon observers did not run the same risks as the airplane pilots, but the work was considered to be more nerve-racking, as the observers had no means of defence, and were continually exposed to shell fire while in the air. The Germans manufactured a special kind of fuse solely for strafing balloons. Most of my observation work in France was done in connection with French and Belgian artillery.” “When the war was over Captain Vetter made a tour of the motor factories in England in order to see what progress was being made as a result of war experience. Among the factories visited were the Austin, Wolseley, and Cubitt establishments. Of the Cubitt car Captain Vetter says that it seemed to him to be the most suitable machine he saw for Australian conditions. It had high ground clearance, the right width of track and was specially designed for accessibility. The whole of the spring shackles and steering pins were fitted with oil-less bushes, doing away with grease cups. It was complete with self-starter, electric light, body fully equipped with detachable wheels, and was to be sold in England at £298. An output of 5000 cars was provided for for the first year. “Numbers of car making firms were springing up all over England, but the majority of these, in Captain Vetter’s opinion, would never reach the stage of production, as their designs were bad and manufacturing facilities poor. Captain Vetter, in commenting on the high price of cars in England, said that he had seen Fords that had seen two years’ service in France sold at Government sales for £150 and upwards. Some of these were minus radiators, steering wheels and other parts. Anything in the shape of a car sold at exhorbitant rates. Western Mail (Perth, WA), Thur 15 Jul 1920 (p.19): BIRTHS VETTER (nee Hough) – On June 29, at Miss Harvey’s Hospital, Aberdeen-street, to Captain and Mrs Vetter – a son. The West Australian, Thur 30 Apr 1931 (p.10): ENGINEERING AWARDS Conditions in the Industry …………………………………………………………….. Otto L. Vetter (proprietor of Vetter and Co. motor engineers), said that in 1929 his firm was employing seven journeymen and two apprentices, but owing to slackness in trade the number to-day was three journeymen and two apprentices. ……………………… http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/32515562 The Daily News (Perth, WA), Thur 7 Dec 1933 (p.1): SAFETY ZONE DISPUTE ………………………………………………………… Tests Carried Out Otto Ludwig Vetter, an engineer, residing at South Perth, said that he had been driving a motor-car for 26 years. He had frequently passed over the King’s Park circus. He would describe the surface as practically a non-skid surface. He had see the site of the proposed safety zone. If the zone were erected and a vehicle passed to the north of it this would not be a safe course. ………………………………………………. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/85180851