• Gustav Herbert Schemalleck

Army / Flying Corps
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  • Birth

    Bundaberg, Queensland, Australia

Stories and comments
    • The Men of "A" Company, 26th Battalion
    • Posted by jaydsydaus121, Tuesday, 14 January 2020

    Daily Mercury (Mackay, Qld. : 1906 - 1954) Tue 13 Apr 1915 Page 5 PERSONAL. Mr. G. H. Schemalleck, officer in charge of the local telephone exchange, expects to leave Mackay at the end of the week for Brisbane. Mr. Schemalleck, a Lieutenant in the Reserves of the Military Forces, has been called to Enoggera Camp for duty, and will report accordingly. In his departure Mackay will lose a capable public servant, who, although brought little into contact with the general public in his official duties, made many friends. In the cause of charity he has often given his services here, while the Rugby Union has found him a willing worker. He will be greatly missed. Mr. E. Staines has received a letter from his son, Mr. Walter Staines, who is with the Australian Expeditionary Force in Egypt, saying that he was well and all were anxious to get to the front. He has forwarded a photograph of himself, with Sergeant T. G. Mulherin (of Mackay) and two others, taken at the foot of the Sphinx in company with a guide. Mr. Staines is showing the photograph in one of his shop windows. Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 - 1973) Sat 22 May 1915 [Issue No.41] Page 953 Department of Defence, Ex. Min. Xo. 356. Melbourne, 19th May, 1915. AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE. Appointments and Promotions. HIS Excellency the Governor-General, acting with the advice of the Federal Executive Council, has been pleased to approve of the following appointments and promotions being made in the Australian Imperial Force, to date from 15th May, 1915, except where otherwise stated : — To be 2nd Lieutenants— 2nd Lieutenant G. H. Schemalleck, Reserve of Officers. Daily Mercury (Mackay, Qld. : 1906 - 1954) Tue 7 Dec 1915 Page 4 LETTER FROM THE FRONT. Mr. B. Z. Robertson. Kent Street, Maryborough, has received a letter from Lieut. G. H. Schemallack, written from Anzac, and dated October 30th, and from which the following extracts are made: ''We came across on a 10,000-tonner from Egypt, and I was on a submarine guard all one night. There is not much pleasure on board a ship with no lights burning and doing everything in the darkness. Our journey from Brisbane to Sydney, thence to Fremantle and Suez was all that could be desired. There was not a single death all the way over, with the exception of one steward belonging to the ship, and he left a wife and three children in England; we opened a subscription,; our boys subscribing well over £100 for her. Envelopes and paper, are like gold over here, and I was lucky enough to secure a little from an E.Y.M.C.A. representative. Our landing on the Peninsula was most successful, there being only one casualty — one, shot through the leg. Up to the present our casualty list is not very big. So far in my platoon I have had one killed and one wounded; Over here we live in dug-outs— that is, burrows in the side of a large hill. We are then quite secure, or rather fairly, secure from shrapnel and rifle fire. I have had many narrow escapes myself. My dug-out is very unique, and I am as comfortable as can be. I have christened it the People's Palace, because I have many visitors to see me. My batman also made a very unique mud oven with a chimney, all made of mud, and it is greatly admired by many. Our food is excellent, and it comprises tea, sugar, bread (twice a week), biscuits in galore, raisins, salt, onions, now and again potatoes and fresh beef, bully beef, mustard, rice, sometimes prunes, bacon every day, and twice I have had a supply of eggs, but they are rare, dried vegetables, which comprise potatoes, celery, cabbage, carrots, etc. ; also we get jam, syrup, and condensed milk. Every second day we get a supply of limejuice, and twice a week an issue of rum. On Sunday we get an issue of tobacco, cigarettes, matches, and soap, so you see one cannot grumble at that. I am sure we get fed much better than Abdul's men, because we captured a Turk the other night — in fact, he jumped into our trenches and said he had enough — and' was very hungry. He was also very poorly clad. He ate two tins of bully beef and eleven army biscuits before stopping. Demonstrations and bombardments some times take place — bullets, shells, and shrapnel fly in all directions. You can hardly hear one speak, while the naval vessels play up with the Turks. Last night I was watching Abdul trying to put a shell on to one of our cruisers in the harbour. They fired about thirty shells, but got no hits. The Turks have a great deal of humour among them. They put their periscope above their trench, our chaps fire at it and try to smash it up, and the Turks signal back a miss or an outer." The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1892 - 1917) Wed 12 Jul 1916 Page 2 LIEUTENANT SCHEMALLECK' S LETTER. Mr. W. Barriskill yesterday received the following letter from Lieutenant Gus Schemalleck written in the trenches the evening after the battle, in which his son received his death wounds. At that time Lieut. Schemalleck did not know, that Q.M.S. Barriskill's wounds had proved fatal. In the Trenches, -France, 26/5/16 Dear Mr. Barriskill,— As on old Bundaberg boy, and in the same company as your son, I thought it my duty as an officer to write and inform you how the brave boy was so severely wounded. I was in charge of the firing-line all day, and on being informed, there was to be a big artillery action, and in view of the retaliation which the Boche may give, the men were warned to take cover. However, the bombardment was very terrific for the short time it lasted, and in which they put over about 150 torpedo bombs, and 400 to 500 shells of all sizes up to 9." Your son, with five others, were wounded by two torpedo bombs which fell in quick succession the first wound he received above the eye, but the second on the head. Every thing possible was done to dress his wounds and get him away on a stretcher, and he was quite conscious, all the time. I have been informed that the doctor in our battalion glves him great hopes of recovery, and which I sincerely trust that will be so, and that he will pull through all right. I might add your son was doing the work of two — that of Quarter-Master Sergeant and Sergt. Major, our Sergeant-Major having gone to England for a few days. My own batman (J. Leaman) was alongside of your son, and he was also severely wounded; this lad has been with me since we left Pinkenbah on 24th May, 1915. Any further intelligence get I shall be only too pleased to write and let you know. Q.M.S Barriskill is well liked by all officers, N.C.O.'s and men of this company, and all regret the occur rence, My sincere wish is that he has a very speedy recovery.— Yours sincerely, G. H. SCHEMALLECK, Lieut. The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1892 - 1917) Mon 17 Jul 1916 Page 3 Local and General LIEUT. GUS SCHEMALLECK WOUNDED. The many friends of Lieutenant Gus Schemalleck, will regret to learn that he has been dangerously wounded in both legs in France. The sad news was received by the gallant officer's sister Miss Schemalleck North Bundeberg on Saturday. Lieut. Schemalleck is well known in Bundaberg the town of his birth. For many years, he was in the local Post and Telegraph Department and then accepted an appointment as mechanic in the Telephone Department, and was subsequently transferred to the north where he enlisted, and his wife and three young children took up their residence in Brisbane during his absence. We hope that the next message concerning him will of a more cheering nature. It is worthy of mention that the three sons of Mr. R. G. Schemalleck of North Bundaberg are serving their King and Country. In addition to Lieut. Schmalleck, Percy Schemalleck is serving in the navy and is attached to the destroyer Yarra. The youngest son Leo is on his way to the front and on Saturday his father received a post card from him at Capetown stating that he was doing well. He enclosed a photo of the transport by which he was travelling and wrote: "This is the ship conveying us on our errand of duty - Hurray - Leo." The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tue 18 Jul 1916 Page 7 News was received in town on. Saturday by relatives that Lieutenant Gus Schemalleck had been dangerously wounded in both legs in France. Lieut. Schemalleck, who is a Bundaberg native, was in the employ of the Telephone Department as mechanic when he enlisted in the North. During his absence his wife and children are residing in Brisbane. Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947) Thu 20 Jul 1916 Page 5 General regret was expressed in Bundaberg when the news was received by I Miss Schemalleck, North Bundaberg, that her brother. Lieut. Gus Schemalleck had been severely wounded in both legs in France. Lieut. Gus Schemalleck is a brother of Mrs. R. Grlgg, Mary borough. The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954) Wed 16 Aug 1916 Page 6 Mrs Schemallick, Brisbane, has received a cablegram from her husband, Lieutenant Gus. Schemallick. who was recently reported seriously wounded, in France, advising that he was now out of danger, and progressing favorably. Lieutenant Schemallick was attached to the Mackay Telephone Exchange. The Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1892 - 1917) Tue 7 Nov 1916 Page 3 LETTER FROM MRS McCANN. LIEUT. SCHEMALLECK'S WOUNDS. We make the following extracts from a letter received by Mr. W.H. McCann, Toowoomba, from Mrs. McCann, who is in charge of a platoon of girls in one of the munition factories at Woolwich, England,. - "I read in the home papers about floods in Queensland, which sounds rather funny in winter there. I am well and working hard. The days are getting much shorter. We shall soon come and go to work in the dark. I was down in Gravesend on Sunday last. I took Lieutenant Schemalleck with me. We had a very enjoyable day and got back about 9.30 in the evening, the hospital being so near. It is very nice. If I started to take up the nursing now, I am sure I could get into the Herbert, as they are so short of nurses. But I am so interested in the work I am doing. I do not like to give it up, and I am doing just as much for my country. I am a real soldier now. I wear my war badge and feel very proud of it. I am going to get an Australian badge to wear with it. The Zepps are expected in England to-night so we will be uneasy to know where they are. I am not afraid one bit. I have not sent you cable yet. Much as I would like to see you I will say do not make up your mind until after the war is over. England is full of wounded men. It is dreadful to see them. I forget did I tell you that Lieutenant Schemalleck has seventy-three wounds on the body, and the piece of shrapnel that would have killed him, went through his field glasses. Had it hit him, it would have blown his side off. I consider he is very lucky. Tell Mr Stiller about him. I am sure he and Miss Stiller would like to know about him.