• James Lindal Stuart Scrymgeour

Army / Flying Corps
  • 1st Australian Light Horse Training Regiment
  • 2nd Australian Light Horse Regiment
  • 1st Light Horse Brigade
  • Acting Corporal
  • Trooper
  • Private

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  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
  • Birth

    Oamaru, Otago, New Zealand

  • Enlistment - WW1

    Warwick, Queensland, Australia

Stories and comments
    • Correct Name
    • Posted by Mapping our Anzacs story, Wednesday, 20 November 2013

    Correct name is James Tindal Steuart Scrymgeour. Refer Australian Dictionary of Biography here

    • SCRYMGEOUR, James Tindal Steuart (O.B.E.)
    • Posted by FrevFord, Tuesday, 13 March 2018

    Born on the 14th of August 1885 Oamaru, New Zealand – son of William Tindal SCRYMGEOUR and Mary MacGREGOR, who married in Dunedin, NZ on the 29/1/1880 The family came to Australia in 1908, and William, a sheep farmer, acquired Callandoon and Tarewinnabar Stations in the Goondiwindi district, Qld – initially in partnership with H.M. Ross. Mary died in July 1925 at their home Callandoon North, aged 77, and William died in December 1929, aged 90. Siblings: *Jessie Macgregor b.1/7/1884 at Ure St, Oamaru – marr Alfred TATLOW 24/5/1919 Glasgow Cathedral; *William Tindal b.10/11/1886 Avon St, Oamaru; *Mary b.1889 Religion: Presbyterian Educated at the Otago High School, Canterbury Agricultural College and Dunedin University Occupation: Grazier, Overseer on the family-owned Callandoon Station, Qld Became engaged to Helen Marjorie BROWN in December 1916 WW1: Enlisted in the A.I.F. at Warwick, Qld on the 21/10/1916 aged 31 Operation for Varicose veins at the 13th Australian General Hospital (AGH) in February 1917 Embarked in Sydney on the A55 Kyarra 3/9/1917 as Trooper 3438 with the 29th Reinforcements of the 2nd Light Horse Regiment, and disembarked Suez, Egypt on the 19/10/1917 To be Acting Corporal 20/10/1917 – reverted to Private and transferred to the 1st LH Training Regt 21/12/1917 Returned to the 2nd LH and taken on strength in the field 6/1/1918 Sick to hospital 29/4/1918 with a septic right hand (and Diarrhoea), and transferred through the hospital system to the 14th AGH, Port Said 11/5/1918 – transferred to the Rest Camp 14/6/1918, and discharged to the 1st LH Tng Rgt, Moascar 26/6/1918 Rejoined the 2nd LH in the field 4/7/1918 Wounded on the 14/7/1918 during an engagement in the Jordan Valley – when a bullet entered the right eye and passed through the back of the nose and the left eye, resulting in total blindness Transferred through the hospital system to the 14th AGH, Port Said, on the 19/7/1918, where he was on the dangerously ill list from the 24/7 to the 1/8/1918 – and it was noted that his general health had been lowered by malaria previously contracted whilst in Palestine Returned to Australia on the Wiltshire, embarking 30/8/1918 and disembarking in Sydney 3/10/1918 for Brisbane, where he was admitted to the 6th AGH at Kangaroo Point 6/10 until the 12/10/1918 Discharged from the A.I.F. on the 24/10/1918 Married Helen Marjorie BROWN at the Ann-street Presbyterian Church, Brisbane on the 25th of November 1918 [Marjorie was born c1895 – the daughter of Mathew John BROWN and Helen (nee Farrand)] In July 1919 James embarked for the UK with Marjorie on the Marathon, where he enrolled in St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blinded Soldiers to undertake a course in Braille, typewriting and Poultry farming The couple returned to Australia on the Aeneas, departing Glasgow on the 16/11/1920 Children (2): *Diana b.4/3/1921 at Oroya private hospital, Strathfield, NSW; *Mary Patricia Grazier and breeder, Netherby Stud, (near Warwick) Qld Awarded the O.B.E. in 1954, it was presented to him by the Queen at Parliament House, Brisbane, on the 10/3/1954 Marjorie died in 1962 Qld Resident of “Teviot,” Ann and Locke Sts, Warwick in 1963 James died on the 27th of March 1965 at his home at Warwick, Qld, aged 79 National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 15 Dec 1916 (p.3): From Near and Far Mr Jim Scrymgeour, Callandoon, Goondiwindi, has gone into camp. Mr Scrymgeour, who is New Zealander, settled with his people on Callandoon some years ago. At the recent show in Brisbane he took eight firsts and eight seconds with his stock, so that he is in more ways than one a sport, and adds another to the hundreds of men who, having so much to give up, have given it cheerfully in their country’s need. The Brisbane Courier (Qld), Sat 23 Dec 1916 (p.15): SOCIAL The engagement is announced of Miss Helen Marjorie Brown (youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs M.J. Brown, Woodfield, Range, Toowoomba, and Cobbrum station, Cunnamulla) to Mr James Tindal Stuart Scrymgeour, A.I.F. (eldest son of Mr and Mrs. W.T. Scrymgeour, Callandoon North and Tarewinnebar, Goondiwindi, Queensland). Darling Downs Gazette (Qld), Sat 6 Jan 1917 (p.3): SOCIAL Mr James Scrymgeour went down to Brisbane on Tuesday and has gone into camp at Enoggera. National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 9 Feb 1917 (p.5): From Near and Far Mr Jim Scrymgeour, Callandoon, whose engagement to Miss Brown was recently announced, is in camp hospital at Fraser’s, but hopes to leave for the front shortly. National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 2 Mar 1917 (p.5): From Near and Far Mrs Brown and Miss Marjorie Brown and Mr Jim Scrymgeour are at the Pacific Hotel, Southport, where Mr Scrymgeour is convalescing after an operation which he underwent recently. National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 4 May 1917 (p.5): From Near and Far Miss Marjorie Brown’s riding was quite a feature of the ring events at the recent Toowoomba show. Miss Brown, besides being an expert horsewoman, has the added attraction of being an exceptionally graceful rider, and to see her in her charming navy blue kit cutting the figure eight on Mr Jim Scrymgeour’s horse “Comet” was a sight for tired eyes. National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 1 Jun 1917 (p.5): From Near and Far Mr Jim Scrymgeour, who has been spending a short furlough in Toowoomba, has returned to camp. National Leader (Brisbane, Qld), Fri 21 Sept 1917 (p.5): FROM VARIOUS CENTRES Mr Jim Scrymgeour, who has been in camp for some months, left for the front last week. Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld), Wed 30 Oct 1918 (p.1): A TIGHT CORNER – GERMANS SURROUND AUSTRALIANS Trooper J.T. Scrymgeour, a member of the Queensland Light Horse, who returned from Palestine a fortnight ago, and is visiting Sydney, lost his eyesight in a severe engagement in the Jordan Valley. The Queenslanders were sharing with New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australian mounted troops, all attached to Brigadier-General Cox’s brigade, the defence of a rocky knoll against what they believed to be Turks. They were about 400 strong. About 2000 Germans, however, on July 14 wormed their way around the knoll, and, coming in behind, caught the Australians in what was practically a trap. But the Australians fought doggedly, and, although almost wiped out, exacted a heavy toll from the Germans, whose casualties were 600, whilst 900 were captured when reinforcements arrived. Three thousand Turks were to have reinforced the Germans, but did not appear, and so a few Australians survived. Lieutenant Len. Henderson, of Brisbane, was awarded the Military Cross in connection with the engagement. Trooper Scymgeour, who was with a party of 50 defending one of the many points on the knoll, received two bullets. One was in the ankle. The other entering the corner of the right eye, found its exit through the left temple, its passage narrowly missing the brain. He lay fourteen hours before being succoured. The enemy barrage and machine gun and rifle fire was so severe that he could not be reached. He was conscious all the time, and has very poignant remembrances of a German giving him a vicious kick on the ribs as he lay helpless. The sight of both eyes was practically destroyed, and Trooper Scrymgeour is in Sydney with the object of ascertaining if the injury is likely to be permanent. Trooper Scrymgeour is a son of Mr W.T. Scrymgeour, of Callandoon, Goodiwindi, and formerly a resident of Parramatta. Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld), Sat 30 Nov 1918 (p.1): SOCIAL GOSSIP A marriage of interest to a large circle of friends was quietly celebrated on Monday afternoon in the Ann-street Presbyterian Church, Brisbane. The bridegroom, Mr James Scrymgeour (son of Mr J.F. Scrymgeour [sic], of Callandoon Station), was in the 2nd Light Horse, A.I.F., and returned wounded. The bride was Miss Marjorie Brown (daughter of Mr and Mrs F.N. Brown, Hilltop, Samford, and formerly of Toowoomba). The bride, who was given away by her father, carried the bridegroom’s colours. Only immediate relatives were present at the ceremony. Mr and Mrs Scrymgeour subsequently left for Southport, where the honeymoon will be spent. The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld), Thur 12 Dec 1918 (p.8): Social and Personal Mr and Mrs J. Scrymgeour have returned from their wedding tour at Southport, and are now residing at Saltwood, Sandgate. Warwick Daily News (Qld), Tue 25 Mar 1919 (p.6): SOCIAL Mr and Mrs J.T.S. Scrymgeour, who has been residing at Clivedon Mansions, Brisbane, for several months, left for North Callandoon last week. Warwick Daily News (Qld), Thur 19 Jun 1919 (p.4): SOCIAL Mr and Mrs J.T.S. Scrymgeour, of North Callandoon, intend leaving for England early next month. Darling Downs Gazette (Qld), Wed 16 Jul 1919 (p.3): SOCIAL Mr and Mrs James Scrymgeour (nee Miss Marjorie Brown) have sailed by the Marathon for England, where later Mr Scrymgeour will enter St Dunstan’s Hospital for treatment for his eyes. The fervent wish of all Mrs Scrymgeour’s friends are for the success of their mission. The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 21 May 1921 (p.12): BIRTHS SCRYMGEOUR (nee Marjorie Brown) – March 4, at Oroya private hospital, Strathfield, to Mr and Mrs J.T.S. Scrymgeour – a daughter (Diana). Sydney Mail (NSW), Wed 15 Nov 1922 (p.23): A Personal Chat Mr and Mrs James Scrymgeour (Netherby, Warwick) are expected in Sydney shortly on a visit to Mrs Scrymgeour’s parents, Mr and Mrs M.J. Brown, of Military-road, Mosman. Mr “Jim” Scrymgeour, whose father owns Callandoon station, in the Goondiwindi district, was totally blinded in the Great War, but is still a keen cattleman, and is going in for stud stock on a little property he recently purchased near Warwick. His wife, who before her marriage was Miss Marjorie Brown, is a first-rate horsewoman, and always put up a splendid record in the ring at the Toowoomba and Brisbane shows. Her knowledge of stock is standing her in good stead now, and she takes an active part in the working of the stud farm at Netherby. Queensland Country Life (Qld), Thur 25 Jul 1935 (p.9): UNDER THE GUMS Among the Cattlemen – Jim Scrymgeour’s Versatility Australia knows James Scrymgeour, of Netherby, as a great cattle breeder; Queensland is observing the fact that he is a breeder of Clydesdales; and Warwick knows that he is also a poultry fancier. When we called at Netherby recently, Mr Jim, the Blind Judge, was industriously engaged “rubbing” one of his Clydesdale colts. He is a magnificent youngster, who will certainly cut a figure at the Brisbane Exhibition. Mr Scrymgeour has been warned against his practical interest in his Clydesdale stud, by some of his well-wishers, but anyone who sees him working in the stall with the animals has his fear for his safety at once dissipated. Nowadays there are comparatively few fowls at the model Netherby, but it is only a couple of years ago that Mr Scrymgeour, to give the local show a hand and, incidentally, indulge in another hobby, started a poultry “stud,” and cleaned up everything about the Warwick Show with birds of his own breeding. Such is the versatility of the real studmaster. The Land (Sydney, NSW), Fri 21 Feb 1936 (p.9): BREEDER’S RETIREMENT “Qld Herds Deteriorating” Commenting on his decision to dispose of his stud, Mr J.T. Scrymgeour, the blind Queensland breeder of Shorthorn cattle, said that he intended to retain a few of his animals as a hobby, and he might breed a few more if prices improved. In the meantime he intended to devote himself to the breeding of Clydesdale horses. He said he was selling out because it did not pay to keep going. There was little demand for stud stock, and the beef herds of Queensland were definitely deteriorating. Macleay Argus (Kempsey, NSW), Wed 4 Nov 1953 (p.2): “THE LAND AND ITS PEOPLE” An amazing story of one of Queensland’s leading cattlemen, “Jim Scrymgeour, the Blind Cattleman,” will be heard in the series “The Land and Its People,” on Friday night at 8.15 p.m., on A.B.C. country regionals. This is the heartwarming study of a man who has triumphed over disability, and brought an instinctive feeling to the selection and breeding of beef cattle, that win innumerable prizes at Royal Shows throughout Australia. Brisbane Telegraph (Qld), Fri 1 Jan 1954 (p.4): Cattleman honoured [Photo] https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/216618027 The Argus (Melb, Vic), Thur 11 Mar 1954 (p.5): QUEEN WAS SO GENTLE Brisbane, Wednesday The Queen was solicitous and thoughtful at her investiture at Parliament House today. ………………………………………….. And Her Majesty could not have been gentler or more kindly than she was with blind Mr J.T.S. Scrymgeour, who received the O.B.E. Helped him Mr Scrymgeour, who was helped to the dais by his wife, broke down when the Queen spoke to him and didn’t realise that she wished to shake hands with him. The Queen spoke to him soothingly, put out her hand, took his stick and put it in his left hand, then took his trembling right hand and gave him the longest Royal handclasp of the tour. Then, as Mr Scrymgeour turned to step down from the dais, she returned his stick firmly to his right hand. Notes: All NZ births etc reg. under Scrimgeour Wrote various Books including: Reminiscences of St Dunstans