• Victor Collins Williamson

Army / Flying Corps
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  • Birth

    Mortlake, VIC, Australia

  • Enlistment - WW1

    Mortlake, VIC, Australia

Stories and comments
    • The Men of the 21st Battalion
    • Posted by jaydsydaus121, Thursday, 22 July 2021

    Mortlake Dispatch (Vic), Wednesday 1 December 1915, page 2 A Newsy Letter. Private Victor C. Williamson, who was one of the Southland heroes, writes to his mother from Gallipoli under date of 10th Oct. as follows:—"Charlie (his brother) is here and in the trenches; I saw him yesterday. He is quite well. I got hit on the edge of the left hand with a small piece of shrapnel shell, but am still working on. There is plenty of septic poisoning about, so I keep it well bound. We have a bathe in the sea nearly every day, shells falling and breaking around us, but, we take no notice of them now. I have had a few days on the sea during the past couple of weeks. We get a spell from the trenches occasionally and go on fatigue, unloading stores from the stores steamer. The bay is full of torpedo boats and destroyers, cruisers, and hospital ships. Frank Seiver came with the 5th Light Horse. Charlie tells me that he has gone to Mudros with appendicitis. Edgar Foster was hit with shrapnel. Just as I am writing a Turkish shell landed in front of my dug-out on the side of a hill, and burst in a sap about ten yards in front, killing a mule going through loaded with ammunition for the trenches. No one else was hurt. The Slater boys are alright at pre-sent. Jack M'Donald, Dick Ahearn, Andy Clancey, and Tip M'Donald (Hexham) are still going strong. There are aero-planes and taubes flying over us all day, dropping bombs and finding out batteries and position of the enemy. There are all sorts of soldiers with us even to Gurhkas. They are splendid shots and hardy little fellows. Last night I met Snowy Quiney on a boat just coming ashore from a troopship. He was wounded in the shoulder at Cape Helles about two months ago and has been to Malta. I had a long talk with him. He is looking well after his spell. He has been here since the landing in April. He gave me a list of all the Mortlake volunteers taken from the "Dispatch." They are a decent lot from little Mortlake. Basil Wagg and Alex M'Kinnon are here near us. Jack M'Donald and Charlie saw them the other day. I see very little of any of our boys now as they are not allowed to roam. I am going visiting this afternoon as I want some paper and envelopes. We are all proud of the work being done by the Australian Red Cross. Nearly every week we got something useful, and it is cheering to us.