• William Harold Treloar

Army / Flying Corps
  • Australian Flying Corps
  • Mesopotamia Half Flight
    Unknown
  • Lieutenant
  • 2nd Lieutenant

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  • 1914–1915 Star
  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
Stories and comments
    • Prisoner of War – William Harold TRELOAR – The first member of the Australian Flying Corps to be captured
    • Posted by FrevFord, Monday, 17 May 2021

    Many will be familiar with the name John Linton Treloar, who during the First World War took on the organisation of the fledgling Australian War Records Section that formed the basis of the Australian War Memorial’s WW1 collection. Perhaps not so well-known was his older brother William Harold Treloar, who became the first member of the Australian Flying Corps to be taken prisoner in WW1. Harold, as he was known throughout his life, was one of Australia’s early aviators. He had begun life on the 8th of August 1889 at Fairfield Park, Victoria, as the first born child of William and Jane Treloar, whose marriage had taken place the year before. At the time of his birth his father William was running a Grocery business in nearby Fitzroy, and was also in partnership as a Land Agent. However, in the November of that same year, he auctioned off all his stock, and by 1892 had a Grocery store in Auburn Rd, Hawthorn, which was later followed by Port Melbourne. It was during these years that Harold gained three new siblings, one of those being the above mentioned John. The family eventually moved to Hamilton in country Victoria, where William was the Manager of A. Miller and Co.’s ‘Mutual Store’ from at least 1898 to 1901, and in 1905 purchased his own store, the ‘Little Wonder’ Cash Store. While the family continued to grow, Harold attended the local State School, followed by the Hamilton Academy, before following a career as a Chauffeur and Motor Mechanic. By 1909 his family had returned to the city and were living in Albert Park, while William was employed as a Commercial Traveller with the Melbourne Merchants, Clark and Co. Pty Ltd. Remaining in the country, Harold was in the employ of Messrs Young Brothers, Auctioneers, Stock, Station and Commission Agents in Horsham, and was apparently the first man to drive a motor car for them. He remained with them for three years, until the July of 1911, and during that time drove many different types of cars throughout Victoria, NSW and South Australia. They found him to be a “first-class Chauffeur, obedient, punctual and obliging.” Further employment included some time as a chauffeur and instructor with J.R. Wotherspoon & Co. General Merchants, Beaufort, and driver and mechanic with N. McDonald Motor Works and Garage, Hamilton. In 1912 Harold was living and working in his mother’s childhood town of Ballarat, and having befriended the Hooley family, he eventually became engaged to their daughter Lilian. He was employed with the Ballarat Motor Works from 1912 to 1913, during which time he was a chauffeur and mechanic from May 1912 to February 1913 with Mr Robert Carstairs Bell of Mooramong, Skipton, who stated: “I found him a most reliable & steady man and about the best driver I have ever known. He also was a first class mechanic & well able to make any ordinary repairs to a motor car. We were all sorry when he left to better himself.” He also found employment with Mr Jasper Coghlan as chauffeur to his 40 h.p. Daimler lorry; and was associated with Messrs Loveland and Haslem’s Garage in 1914. After nine years’ experience as a chauffeur and motor mechanic, Harold felt that his prospects for the future weren’t the best, and in 1914 he decided to change careers and follow his ambition to become an aviator. Fuelled by a visit to Ballarat in early April of the aviator Harry Hawker, he promptly booked his passage to England and sailed on the Orsova on the 15th of the same month. On landing in London on the 16th of May he first spent a couple of weeks at the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company. “He had been advised by the military representative at the High Commissioner’s office to undergo a course at the company’s school at Brooklands. He witnessed the building of numerous machines for the Royal Flying Corps, as well as Bristol biplanes both of the tractor and propeller types.” With this grounding, he then moved on to the Bristol flying school which was also at the Brooklands Aerodrome, Weybridge. His first trip in the air was with Billy Stutt, an Australian pilot, who had gained his Royal Aero Certificate in February that year. Harold obtained his Royal Aero Club Aviator’s Certificate No. 835 at The Bristol School in a Bristol Biplane on the 9th of July 1914, “after only three weeks’ tuition under very unsettled weather conditions.” He then took an extended course at the Bleriot Monoplane School, also at Brooklands. In a letter home dated the 16th of July 1914 he wrote: “So far I have not broken the least thing through any fault of my own. One morning I had just landed when an overstrained wire broke, and caught the propeller, which, of course, burst. The pieces broke the rudder and elevator wires, which, if it had happened in the air, would have meant a big fall and bad bump, as I had been up 300ft. However, it shows what can happen and what luck means.” Following the outbreak of war at the beginning of August, civilian flying in England came to a standstill and joining the Royal Flying Corps would not guarantee much flying as there were “four pilots already available for every machine.” So, on hearing that instruction had commenced at the Australian Flying School, Harold quickly returned home. He departed London on the Osterley on the 28th of August 1914 and arrived back in Melbourne on the 6th of October. As soon as he landed, Harold, who was already a 2nd Lieutenant in the 70th (Ballarat) Infantry Regiment, immediately set about securing an appointment with the Australian Flying Corps (AFC). Having completed a two week course in aerial observation at Point Cook in February 1915, this was followed up by a three week course for a further pilot’s certificate in the March. On the 8th of February 1915 the Indian Government had requested pilots, transport staff and equipment from Australia to serve with the Indian Army in the campaign against the Turks in the Tigris Valley, Mesopotamia. Having agreed to send what became known as a ‘Half Flight’ (half the strength of a standard Flight), four pilots were selected from the few that were available. Under the command of Captain Henry Petre would be Captain Thomas White, Lieutenant George Merz and Harold. His commission as a 2nd Lieutenant with the AFC came through on the 12th of April 1915. Capt Petre sailed on the Orontes on the 14th of April in order to make advance arrangements, and Harold flew over his ship in a farewell gesture. Having received his final leave Harold travelled to Ballarat the following day of the 15th, where he married his fiancé Alice Lilian HOOLEY in the Christ Church Cathedral on the 17th of April 1915. Four days later on the 20th of April 1915 he left his new bride with her mother in Ballarat, and returned to Melbourne where together with Thomas White and most of the other members of the Half Flight he embarked on the RMS Morea for India. George Merz who had been temporarily detained on instruction duties at Point Cook, followed Harold’s earlier gesture and flew over their ship as it left the pier, signalling his farewell. From Bombay the Half Flight then travelled to Basra arriving on the 26th of May 1915, where they were joined in June by Merz. “The four Officers were gazetted temporarily into the Indian Army, and on 11th June 1915 were gazetted into the Royal Air [Flying] Corps.” On the 3rd of June Harold wrote home: “Everything is O.K. We have two Maurice-Farman fighting biplanes going, and I have been over the Turkish lines at Kurna, acting as pilot and observer. We fly at 5000 feet, so if they hit us, good luck to them. These machines carry a passenger and fuel for four hours, and do a little less than 60 miles an hour ground speed. We have dropped bombs, but with little success. But we have done some good reconnaissance, locating trenches, guns and so forth. We advance to Barham Island to-morrow, and start a new depot there. It is fearfully hot, about 110 to 120 degrees in the shade, and when there is no breeze it is simply a real Turkish bath. I was the first Australian member of the Australian Flying Corps to fly over the enemy’s lines, and also the first Australian to fly in this country.” This was followed up on the 25th of June with: “Just a line to let you know I am still in the land of the living, and going strong. Had several exciting times lately, through engine failure, mainly through the heat making the oil inefficient. I had to come down in the desert, stay there all day till they sent out a strong party to guard the machine, and I thought it best to stay there, for I am sure the Arabs would have destroyed the machine. On a later occasion the engine stopped when we were over water, and it took me all my time to coax it back to our island base. The Arabs shoot at us repeatedly, but so far they have not registered on us. I have been given the piloting of No.1 Maurice Farman biplane, fitted with bomb droppers, but have not seen any large Turkish force yet to try my hand.” “I have flown about 900 miles, and not so far felt any ill-effects, but it is a strain, for the wind here is so strong at times that we fly only about 20 feet or so from the ground to make any headway at all; in fact, at one place we have been blown backwards.” By September they had received more planes and while piloting Caudron 1 during a reconnaissance flight on the 16th of that month, its engine gave out and Harold was forced to land about 80 yards in front of the enemy position at Essin, south of Kut-el-Amara. A Turkish officer (later taken prisoner by the British) watched through his binoculars as the event unfolded. The information gleaned from him was that: “The machine came down quite slowly and bumped once or twice gently on the ground before it stopped. At first the officers tried to make a bolt for it, but saw it was impossible and returned to the machine. They were both unhurt. After they (the Turks) had taken the two officers from the machine our (British) guns opened fire on it and tried to smash it, whereupon they (the Turks) led one of them (the officers) back in its direction and the guns ceased fire, and they (the Turks) were then able to get it away.” Harold and his observer Captain Basil Atkins of the Indian Army were the first two officers to be captured in Mesopotamia. They were actually lucky, as two of their former colleagues, Lieut George Merz (AFC) and his pilot passenger Lieut William Burn (NZSC att RFC) had previously been killed by Arabs under similar circumstances. Following their safe landing, excerpts of Harold’s description of their capture and incarceration are as follows: “They opened fire on us with machine guns and rifles, and, though the firing was kept up for 10 to 15 minutes, we were both captured unhurt. Until the Turkish officers came up to us, we had a hand-to-hand fight with the Arabs, who would have killed us but for the intervention of the Turks. We were stripped and taken before the Turkish commander, Nurredin Pasha, who told us that if we did not give him all the information he desired we would be shot. I asked him if he would tell the British anything if he were a prisoner. He answered ‘No,’ and did not continue the questioning, but gave us coffee and cigarettes. We were very surprised later to get tea and biscuits made in Melbourne. Captain Atkins and I were subsequently sent by river steamer to Bagdad. At every town or village along the river the Arab Sheik with his followers, came on board to look at us and at our 80 h.p. Caudron biplane, which had been riddled with rifle and shrapnel bullets. On our arrival in Bagdad, the machine was exhibited for the benefit of the Red Crescent – the Turkish equivalent of our Red Cross. We were royally received in Bagdad. Fully 50 officers came on board to see us, and crowds of people lined the banks of the Tigris. We entered the ‘Abode of Peace,’ once the most brilliant city in the Moslem world, with flags flying, and the steamer’s whistle blowing. We were put in a large hospital, and a strong guard was placed over us. We were given permission to buy clothes and to have a bath, a real Turkish bath. The director of the Red Crescent was very kind to us, and saw that we received good food. The commandant, Huckle Bey, took us for several drives, but, as he could not get any information out of us, the drives were discontinued.” “After remaining 10 days in Bagdad, where we were treated with the utmost kindness and civility, we were sent to Stamboul, by way of Mosul. The party that accompanied us to Mosul consisted of 15 Indian sepoys and a guard of 20 mounted gendarmes, with one officer. The Indians travelled in open carts, but we were given an Arabarner, a closed carriage, in which you lie down. The officer in charge could speak a little French, so we were able to find out a little about the country we travelled through. After two days we reached Samara, and Tickereet was our next halting place. On our arrival at Mosul we were handed over to the military authorities, and placed in an old dirty barracks. From now on their treatment of us changed for the worse. It was winter, and the very small room in which we were confined had bare floors. The windows had no glass, and, to keep warm, we had to huddle together in a corner. After a few days, Captain Atkins became very ill with dysentery and fever. We could not eat the hotel food, because of its oiliness and filth, and we lived for a few weeks on boiled fowl and rice.” “About six weeks after our arrival in Mosul, Captain T.W. White and Captain Yeats Brown, both of the Australian Flying Corps, joined us. Shortly afterwards Major Reilly, our flight commander, and Lieutenant Fulton arrived. Thus by the irony of fate six flying officers who had messed together at Busra were now prisoners of war.” Thomas White (who had been captured on the 13/11/1915) later described his first impressions of both Harold and Atkins as being so wasted and feeble with fever and dysentery that they were hardly recognizable. But they began to show improvement straight away, the only possible reason being a lift in morale. The treatment of the men here was far worse than that of the officers, and as much as Harold and his fellow officers tried to help them, there was not a lot they could do, and subsequently many died. Harold went on to say: “You can imagine our joy when, after five months, we heard that we were to be sent to Aleppo. [They departed Mosul on the 20/2/1916] Our great trouble was to get cash as nobody would accept Turkish notes. The German consul finally changed some of our notes thus enabling us to pay our debts and to give the men a little money to spend en route. The few German officers we met in Turkey were very good to us. Two hundred men were sent with us from Mosul, but only 30 arrived at Aleppo. Here we were allowed to stay at the Hotel America, the nearest approach to civilization we had experienced since our capture. While at Aleppo Harold developed severe rheumatism in his knees and was granted permission to visit the hospital for treatment. “After spending 10 days in Aleppo we again entrained for a destination unknown. On our way we passed through Marmure, Tersus, and Byzanti, finally reaching Afion Karahissar [on the 24/3/1916], where we were placed in an empty house which was new and clean. That same night three British officers escaped from another house, with the result that we were placed in an Armenian church with all the other British, French, and Russian prisoners. The treatment we received here was good. Moreover we began to hear talk of peace. Our evenings were spent in attending our ‘theatre’ or else in mock trials and debates.” Six weeks after their crowded incarceration in the church they were transferred to houses in the town. “In March, 1917, in company with four other British officers, I was sent to Constantinople, as a reprisal for alleged mistreatment of five Turkish officers in Cairo. We were placed in a filthy underground cell for 63 days, no exercise whatever being allowed. [They were held in Seraskerat Prison] After 101 days we were released owing to the efforts of the American consul, and were allowed to return to Afion Karahissar, where we remained till the signing of the armistice. Thanks to the Australian Red Cross Society and the Royal Flying Corps Aid Committee we received many parcels, but I think only about 30 per cent of those sent.” All the officers and men were very grateful to the Australian Red Cross Prisoner of War Department run by Miss M.E.M. Chomley, not only for the parcels of food and clothing sent by them, but also for their untiring attempts to do anything that was asked of them. Although still a prisoner of war, Harold was promoted to Lieutenant on the 15th of August 1918. Following Turkey’s unconditional surrender on the 30th of October 1918 he was finally repatriated after 3 years and 2 months of incarceration, embarking at Smyrna on the 19th of November and arriving at Alexandria, Egypt, on the 21st. He was then returned to Australia on the Aeneas, embarking on the 2nd of January 1919 and disembarking in Melbourne on the 5th of February. His appointment was terminated on the 30th of March 1919, and on the 1st of July 1920 he was transferred to the Reserve of Officers, and eventually placed on the Retired List on the 27th of November 1943. Unfortunately Harold’s homecoming was not a joyous one. During his years of absence he and his wife had kept up a regular correspondence, and he was given no indication that anything was untoward. However, before leaving Egypt he had received a letter from his father explaining that his wife had recently given birth to a child. Although she asked him for a second chance, he filed for a divorce in the March and the marriage was dissolved in the May. A great believer in the future of Commercial Aviation before the outbreak of war, Harold stepped straight into this new industry on his return home. When the Defence Department began selling off their planes in 1919, Messrs Fenton and Carey bought four Maurice Farmans with the intention of opening a flying school and passenger service from their property in Port Melbourne. Harold with three other pilots from the Central Flying School at Point Cook delivered the planes to them on the 11th of April, and part of the purchasing deal was that he would provide instruction on the operation and maintenance of the planes. They also employed him as a pilot and during his time with them he flew 270 passengers. Harold’s personal life also took a turn for the better when on the 23rd of August 1919 at Echuca, he married Ida Emmerson TREWIN from Albert Park. The couple at first lived with Harold’s parents in Albert Park before setting up house in Ivanhoe, and over the years they had three children together. During the month before his marriage, Harold had gone into partnership with air mechanic Hector Lord and flight sergeant Richard Lonsdale, both of whom had served with him in the Half Flight in Mesopotamia, and they purchased their own plane from the Defence Department, a 100 horsepower De Haviland 6 bi-plane for £500. They then toured Victoria giving passenger flights and exhibitions. By mid-December 1919 they had visited 34 towns, having flown 6000 miles and taken up more than 700 passengers. Mid-May 1920 had brought the distance travelled to more than 15,000 miles, while carrying 1900 passengers. Following each flight they issued their passengers with a certificate to show that they had made the flight. In August 1920 Harold was one of the pilots who took part in the aerial Tour of Victoria to raise awareness for the Second Peace Loan campaign. The Peace Loans were established by the Government to raise money to carry out their obligations to resettle the returning army. The opening ceremony took place at the Melbourne Town Hall on Friday the 6th of August, and was followed by a procession through the city, while the four Avro planes taking part in the tour, flew overhead dropping leaflets urging subscriptions to the loan. The following Monday together with Mechanic Flight Sgt Cecil Hazlitt, Harold set off on his allocated tour route, which involved visiting the towns in North-Western Victoria. However, he was dogged by trouble from day one: “We headed for Clunes and Learmonth. We had a very hard time. Ballarat and district were enveloped in a thick white mist which rendered flying very difficult. The bad weather continued until Friday and our plane had to face rain, hail and snow, in addition to heavy wind. So thick was the rain at one stage that we had to descend to within 100 feet of the ground in order to pick out a paddock in which we could land.” Having returned to Point Cook, they set off again on Tuesday 17th August for Kyneton, and on landing later that day an unfortunate accident occurred. On the ground Police-Sergeant Hore who was keeping back the crowd was knocked down by one of the back wings of the plane, suffering a badly bruised shoulder and shock. Things got worse the following morning as they took off to head to Bendigo, when only 100 feet off the ground the engine failed. The plane plummeted to the ground and was totally wrecked, but miraculously Harold and Hazlitt were able to walk away with nothing more than a severe shaking. They returned to Melbourne that night. Flying a new plane, Harold and Hazlitt set off again on Monday the 23rd of August, having taken over a section of the North-Eastern district so that that area could be completed by the Wednesday. The Tour of the State finished on the following Friday, the 27th, with an Aerial Derby; the four pilots who had taken part in the Tour, competing to see who could fly the fastest from Serpentine (near Bendigo) to the Melbourne Town Hall. Carrying bags of mail to be dropped on arrival, they took off from the racecourse at two minute intervals and circled the township before continuing on their way. Harold’s plane won the day, travelling the 116 miles in one hour and fifteen minutes, the other three planes not far behind. After a few circuits of the city two of the planes then flew on while Harold and Capt McKenzie had to land at the Port Melbourne aerodrome to refuel, their tanks being almost empty. Early in October Silver cups were presented to the winners by the president of the East Loddon Shire Council. In October 1920 Harold was given the job of delivering the ‘Sunraysia Daily’ newspaper throughout the Mildura and Riverina districts. Three weeks into the run and he struck engine trouble. Although he managed to land safely, he subsequently crashed into a fence, damaging one of the plane’s wings, but escaped injury himself. Flying with the Shaw-Ross Aviation Company in the December, he took part in the delivery of ‘The Herald’ to all the bayside resorts between Port Melbourne and San Remo. That month also saw the running of the first Australian Aerial Derby and Flying Carnival, in which Harold won the opening event by managing to drop a small parachute within 25 yards of a white triangle marked in the centre of the Epsom racecourse at Mordialloc. Having obtained his Civil Aviation Licence in June 1921, with the early number of 20, Harold was then employed as a Representative of the Aviation Department of the Shell Company of Australia Ltd (British Imperial Oil Coy). At the end of November he escaped injury following a successful landing in windy weather, when a sudden gust then flipped his plane over, causing considerable damage. A week later his Ivanhoe home was broken in to by thieves, who stole jewellery, clothing and a pair of binoculars. Late 1924 early 1925 Harold was transferred to Bendigo where he spent the next five years as the Superintendent for the District, before being transferred to the Adelaide branch in March 1930. It was noted that: “While in Adelaide, Captain Treloar, in accordance with the Shell Company’s policy, will devote his attention to stimulating public interest in aviation.” Before leaving Bendigo he became one of the founders of the Bendigo Aero Club which was established in 1929. By 1934 he had returned to Victoria and continued working with the Shell Company until 1940 (as a Salesman) at which time he was appointed to the State Liquid Fuel Control Board. The final three months of 1942 saw him employed with the State Taxation Department. Harold died suddenly on the 11th of October 1950 in Bendigo where he was employed as a Motor Salesman – he was 61 years old. He is buried in the Warringal Cemetery, Heidelberg, and was joined by his wife Ida in 1982. ******************* Harold’s parents: William Henry TRELOAR and Jane Freeman CADDY married in Vic in 1988. William who had been born at Linton (near Ballarat) died on the 7/1/1930 at his home in Heidelberg, aged 65. Jane who had been born and bred in Ballarat, died on the 18/8/1942 also at home in Heidelberg, aged 72. Harold’s Siblings: *Reginald Claremont b.21/6/1891 Hawthorn (Grocer’s Assistant) – WW1: Cpl 609 (MM), 4th MG Bn – WW2 – d.1969 Heidelberg; Grace Beatrice b.1893 Melb – d.1894 (5M); *John Linton b.10/12/1894 Port Melb (Military Staff Clerk) marr Clarissa M W Aldridge 5/11/1918 Notting Hill, UK – WW1: Maj (O.B.E.) 1st Div HQ (Aust War Records Sect) – WW2 – d.28/1/1952 Canberra; Vera Grace Larewance b.1898 Warrnambool – marr L.R. OATES 25/10/1924 – d.1954; Alexander Glenroy b.1900 Hamilton (Salesman, Warehouseman); Mary Thelma b.1901 Hamilton – marr BARKWAY – d.1974; Arthur Charles Caddy b.1902 Hamilton (Mechanic) – d.8/2/1963 WA. Harold’s Children (3): *William Herbert Ross b.18/8/1922 Ivanhoe (Wireless Operator) – WW2: Merchant Navy – d.2002, *Eric John (Draughtsman) b.1925 – d.1998, *Janette Mary – marr K.B. IRESON – d.2016 For more in-depth detail in regard to: *Half Flights time in Mesopotamia: – The Official History, Vol VIII The A.F.C.; “Fire in the Sky” by Michael Molkentin *Harold’s incarceration – “Guests of the Unspeakable” by Thomas W. White

    • William Harold Treloar - Newspaper Articles etc...
    • Posted by FrevFord, Monday, 17 May 2021

    The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Tue 14 Apr 1914 (p.2): EVENTS OF THE DAY PROSPECTIVE AVIATOR Ballarat is to have an aviator of its own, if the ambitions of Mr Harold Treloar are realized. Of a mechanical turn of mind Mr Treloar, who of recent years has been employed by Mr Jasper Coghlan as chauffeur to his 40 h.p. Daimler lorry, has mastered all the intricacies of motor mechanism, and is now bent upon “taking the air.” With this objective in view Mr Treloar sails to-morrow by the Orsova, to undertake a course of training at the Bristol School of Aviation, after which it is his intention to return to his native heath and demonstrate the knowledge acquired abroad. His many Ballarat friends will wish Mr Treloar, the first Ballarat “tryer,” success in his mission. Prior to his departure the principals and employees of Messrs Loveland and Haslem’s garage farewelled their confrere, and many were the sentiments of good luck and bon voyage expressed. Mr Arthur Loveland, on behalf of those assembled, presented Mr Treloar with a valuable travelling rug, and in doing so, expressed regret at his retirement, although only temporary. He, with those present, felt proud to know that Mr Treloar’s capabilities as a motorist could not be improved upon, and that it was his intention to move “higher up.” Mr Treloar feelingly responded, stating that his resolve to do and dare was a fixed one, and that he had every confidence that he would return a flyer. He sincerely thanked his old associates for their kind words and acceptable present. The gathering dispersed with cheers for the departing guest. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Sat 11 Jul 1914 (p.4): BALLARAT AIRMAN – HAROLD TRELOAR SECURES CERTIFICATE It will be heard with keen satisfaction by his many Ballarat friends that Mr Harry Treloar, son of the late Mr Geo. Treloar, chemist [sic], of this city, cabled out to day that he had secured his aero certificate, and is now taking a special course at the Bleriot monoplane school. Mr Treloar left Ballarat only on the 15th April last, and has evidently made remarkable progress. His intention was to go through a course of study at the Bristol Aero College. He is an excellent example of Australian pluck and stamina. It is fair to him to say that he is entirely self-supporting, having saved his money in order to follow his hobby. Also he has been rewarded, for he can claim the honor of being the first Ballarat boy to gain the aero certificate. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Mon 13 Jul 1914 (p.4): GENERAL NEWS AVIATOR CERTIFICATE We are informed that Mr Harold Treloar, who has gained his aviation certificate at Bristol, England, is not a son of the late Mr T. Treloar, of this city; but of Mr W.H. Treloar, traveler for Clark and Co., Melbourne, and a grandson of Mrs Caddy, formerly of Skipton street. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Tue 18 Aug 1914 (p.3): BALLARAT AVIATOR – MR H. TRELOAR RETURNING PROBABLY FLIGHTS IN BALLARAT Writing from the Bleriot Monoplane School, Brooklands, England, to Mr Gar. Fishwick on July 16, Mr Harold Treloar, the Ballarat aviator, said: – “Had the pleasure (?) of being handed back the cable I sent to you, marked ‘insufficient address,’ so I was so disgusted I let it slide. I passed a real good ticket at the Bristol school with well-banked figure eights and a volplane from 1000ft (the altitude test). Could not get higher for low-flying clouds. I am now having ‘an extended course at the Bleriot Monoplane school, and find that I have done a good thing in taking on the monoplane, as it is quite different to a biplane course. Am flying very well, after only a few days’ practice. In fact, I’m sure flying is my vocation now, and I must try my hardest to get a ‘bus to fly about in out there. So far I have not broken the least thing through any fault of my own. One morning I had just landed when an overstrained wire broke, and caught the propeller, which, of course, burst. The pieces broke the rudder and elevator wires, which, if it had happened in the air, would have meant a big fall and bad bump, as I had been up 300ft. However, it shows what can happen and what luck means. There are about thirty Australians over here in different parts, but few of them are financial enough to get the tuition necessary for their aviation tickets.” Mr Treloar added that he hoped to get back to Australia by the Osterley, due early in October, and that should sufficient inducement offer he might take the air, afterwards returning to England, where he hoped to join the Royal Naval Air Service as flight-lieutenant. (Note – When Mr Treloar wrote, the European war had not commenced, and it may possibly affect his plans.) The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Mon 24 Aug 1914 (p.1): AUSTRALIAN AVIATOR The following complimentary reference to Mr. H. Treloar’s abilities as an aviator appears in the July issue of “Flight,” the official organ of the Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom – “It seems that our cousins from ‘down under’ possess a wonderful faculty for acquiring the knack of piloting an aeroplane. Mr Harold Treloar, of Ballarat, obtained his ticket – a very good one it is, too – at the Bristol school Brooklands, on July 9th, after only three weeks’ tuition under very unsettled weather conditions. He has now arranged to take an extended course at the Bleriot school at Brooklands, in order to familiarize himself with the handling of monoplanes. Mr Treloar, who intends to go back to Australia in the middle of August, will probably take a British-built machine with him. Good luck to him.” The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Wed 7 Oct 1914 (p.4): BALLARAT AVIATOR – MR HAROLD TRELOAR RETURNS Mr Harold Treloar, the “Ballarat aviator” – we venture to emphasise the point, despite our correspondent of the other evening, who asserted Mr Treloar was not as much a Ballarat aviator as were Hawker and Bustead – returned from England last evening. He travelled on the Osterley, which reached Melbourne yesterday, and he came up by train in the evening. Mr Treloar was seen by an “Echo” reporter to-day, to whom he communicated some very interesting particulars of his “flying trip” to Great Britain. It was indeed a flying trip in more than one sense. Mr Treloar was early in April last a humble Ballarat young man with an ambition to fly as an aviator. The visit to Ballarat of Hawker, the first Australian aviator, fired his ambition to such an extent that he promptly booked his passage to England, and within nine or ten weeks of leaving his home, or five weeks after landing, he was the happy possessor of the certificate of the Royal Aero Club, gained at the Brooklands flying school after three weeks’ tuition. The certificate was at this stage of the interview produced by Mr Treloar, and it contained the following lines: – “Federation Aeronautique Internationale – British Empire. – We, the undersigned, recognized by the F.A.I. as the sporting authority in the British Empire, certify that Mr W.H. Treloar having fulfilled all the conditions stipulated by the F.A.I., has been granted an aviator’s certificate of the Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom. – Marquis of Tullarbardine, president; H.E. Derrin, secretary; also the following printed in six different languages: – “The civil, naval and military authorities, including the police, are respectfully requested to aid and assist the holder of this certificate.” A photograph of Mr Treloar also appears on the certificate, which is in the form of a leather folding booklet. After getting his certificate Mr Treloar proceeded to indulge his fancy to his heart’s content, for whilst in England he participated in no fewer than 250 flights, as often as six or seven before breakfast by way of constitutional or an appetizer as he aptly put it. Mr Treloar rose to 1000ft on his test flight (though the minimum was 300 feet), volplaning from that height, and he also executed two sets of “figure eight” and “Flight,” the official organ of the British aviators, on July 17, described Mr Treloar’s performance as a “very good one in very unsettled weather conditions.” Mr Treloar said he had a few flights with pilots before undergoing his test, and his first trip was with Stutt, an Australian pilot, who was very helpful to him. That was rather a thrill, but he soon became accustomed to the sensation, which was not as unnerving as looking over a precipice and feeling the promptings to jump. He felt that his first solo flight was exciting, as he realized that his life was dependent on his successfully controlling his machine; but it passed off well. “Any falls? Oh, yes, one only. I was up 60ft one day, and I discovered that I had forgotten to turn on the petrol. I had to make a hurried descent, and the under carriage was damaged. But that is an everyday occurrence in England.” “What would have happened had you been further up?” “Oh, I could have made a good landing in that case.” Mr Treloar added that if one could fly in a Bleriot monoplane he could fly in any machine built. Bleriots were very sensitive and most scientifically built. The Bleriot monoplane in which Guillaux flew to Ballarat was, he understood, in the possession of the Australian Defence Department, and, that being so, he hoped to indulge in a flight in the machine ere long. If he was fortunate in getting an appointment from the Defence department on the instructional staff of the Australian Flying School, Mr Treloar said he would endeavor to fly to Ballarat as soon as possible. Asked why he was led to take up flying, Mr Treloar said that he realized that the life of a motor mechanic did not offer the best prospects, so he thought he would go further and seek to fly for a living. He felt that his nine years’ experience as a motor mechanic would stand him well, as in that period he had personal and thorough knowledge of almost every well-known make of motor. He gained further experience of motor mechanics by spending two weeks after landing in England inspecting the works of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company, giving special attention to the engine department. He had been advised by the military representative at the High Commissioner’s office to undergo a course at the company’s school at Brooklands. He witnessed the building of numerous machines for the Royal Flying Corps, as well as Bristol biplanes both of the tractor and propeller types. It was afterwards that he proceeded to the flying school. Having won his certificate, which was easily enough obtained, he took an extended course at the Bleriot monoplane school, crosscountry flying almost daily on tractor monoplanes in winds up to 25 miles per hour, and reaching to an altitude of 3500 feet, and remaining in the air up to 60 minutes. He also made flights in the Sunbeam-Farman and Bristol machines. Mr Treloar has a testimonial letter from the manager of the Bleriot school, setting forth that he (Mr Treloar) was considered capable of obtaining his superior brevet, to obtain which one had to execute a volplane from 2000 feet, and a cross-country flight of 50 miles. He had fulfilled the first condition, but was unable to go on the cross-country flight, owing to War Office restrictions coming into force, on account of the war. The writer of the testimonial considered that Mr Treloar would have no difficulty in fulfilling the latter condition if given the opportunity. Hearing that instruction had been commenced at the Australian Flying School, and finding that he could not get a chance of flying in the European war (for which he volunteered) owing to there being four pilots already available for every machine extant, he had hurriedly returned to Australia, in the hope of securing an appointment in the flying school here. With that object in view, Mr Treloar, on stepping off the Osterley at Port Melbourne yesterday, sought out Major Reynolds, of the Australian Flying Corps, and, as a result of the interview, has arranged to revisit Melbourne to-morrow, and again see the major. He has hopes of securing an early appointment. In reply to a query on the point, Mr Treloar said that owing to the war flying in England was almost at a standstill when he was leaving, and the thoughts of flying men were mostly on the aeroplane in war. But the aeroplane in commerce was bound to come ere long, as there was no doubt that it would prove a big factor in rapid mail carrying and quick transport across country, and thus enabling commercial men to be indifferent to the roughest country. In reply to further inquiries, Mr Treloar said there was no truth in the cabled report at the outbreak of the war that Garros, the French aviator, had sacrificed his life in piercing a German Zeppelin. The Zeppelins were tremendous airships, resembling in size the big P. and O. liners, and they had to be very carefully handled. The hangars that accommodated them cost £500,000, having to be built on a large swivel, in order that they could be turned about at will, as the airships required to be driven against the wind when entering the hangars. Mr Treloar was amused when he read the complaint of A. Watson in the “Echo” of last Friday that he had been designated as the “Ballarat aviator.” He said he was very much a Ballarat boy. He had lived here since infancy, and his grandfather was Mr M. Caddy an old resident of Skipton street. He had been educated here, and had been employed in the motor mechanical business for the past nine years, entering Mr C.E. Kiel’s employ when that gentleman started business as a motor mechanic, and, as Mr Treloar proposes to marry a Ballarat girl, being engaged to Miss Hooley, daughter of Constable Hooley, of Redan, his interests are very much Ballaratian. Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, Sat 28 Nov 1914, Issue 96 (p.2594): MILITARY FORCES OF THE COMMONWEALTH APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, ETC. 70th Infantry (Ballarat Regiment) WILLIAM HAROLD TRELOAR to be 2nd Lieutenant (Provisional). Dated 30th June, 1914. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Wed 2 Dec 1914 (p.4): BALLARAT AVIATOR Mr Harold Treloar, the Ballarat aviator, who recently returned from England, has been appointed a second lieutenant of the 70th Ballarat Infantry Regiment. He has been promised an appointment to the Australian Flying Corps Instructional Staff, and will thus carry his rank with him when he enters the aviation corps. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Thur 25 Feb 1915 (p.2): EVENTS OF THE DAY BALLARAT AIRMAN Included in the list of those who passed the aerial observation course recently held at the Point Cook aviation school is Lieut H. Treloar, 70th Infantry, Ballarat. A three weeks’ course of instruction in the actual piloting of military aeroplanes begins on Monday, when Lieut Treloar with other officers will enter for the pilot’s certificate – the certificate which testifies to their ability to handle and repair a flying machine. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Mon 1 Mar 1915 (p.8): AIR PILOTS TRAIN – OFFICERS BEGIN COURSE A three weeks’ course of instruction of candidates for air pilots’ certificates began at the Commonwealth aerodrome, Point Cook today. The following officers are undergoing the course: – …………………………; Lieut H.W. Treloar, 70th Infantry, Victoria; …………………. The Ballarat Courier (Vic), Mon 8 Mar 1915 (p.6): MILITARY NEWS The following battalion order has been issued by Mjr J.S. Lazarus, Commanding 70th Infantry – Ballarat, 6/3/15. The undernamed men are on command whilst serving with the A.I.F. – …………………………….. The undermentioned officers have been allotted to the various companies as under – A Company: ……………. B Company: 2nd Lts W.H. Treloar and ….. The Age (Melb, Vic), Tue 13 Apr 1915 (p.8): AUSTRALIAN AVIATORS – DEPARTING FOR INDIA Members of the Commonwealth Flying Corps, whose head quarters are at Point Cook aviation school, will shortly be leaving Australia for service under the Indian military authorities. An announcement to this effect was made some time ago by the Minister of Defence, who then stated that the Indian Government had cabled over to the Commonwealth asking the Government if it could supply aviators for certain military service. This the Government agreed to do, provided that India would arrange for the aeroplanes, and Australia is now supplying what is technically known as a “half flight,” in accordance with the terms of the agreement. With this half flight, the exact composition of which the Minister made public yesterday, will go certain transport waggons, specially constructed for carrying aeroplanes – big, grey affairs, considerably longer than the usual transport waggons. But the flying machines themselves will be provided by the Indian Government. Captain H. Petre, well known in Australian military circles as an aviator of great skill and daring, will go in command. He recently went to German New Guinea in the hopes of seeing active service there with the Australian Expedition: but fate was against him, and the Germans surrendered before it was found necessary to employ the B.E. biplane which Captain Petre took with him. With Captain Petre will go Captain T.W. White, and Lieutenants H. Treloar and H.B. Merz – all competent aerial pilots. In addition there will go with the detachment one foreman artificer, warrant officer, one staff-sergeant, one quartermaster sergeant, one farrier sergeant, one sergeant, three corporals, twelve air mechanics, fifteen drivers (for mules), four batmen and two cooks – making a total of 45. It is a fine advertisement for Australia’s military air service that, despite its youth, it can yet turn out an efficiently organized detachment like the above, with transport, ready for service abroad. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Fri 16 Apr 1915 (p.1): BALLARAT AVIATOR – LIEUT TRELOAR’S FAREWELL VISIT DEPARTS FOR INDIA NEXT WEEK Lieut Harold Treloar, the young Ballarat aviator, who has been detailed to assist in establishing an aviation corps in India, together with Captain White, Lieut Petre, and Lieut Merz, paid a farewell visit to Ballarat last evening. In the course of an interview with an “Echo” representative, Lieut Treloar said he was looking forward with great interest to his trip to India. Lieut Petre left on Wednesday by the Orontes, and he and Captain White sail on Tuesday next. On Wednesday Lieut Treloar made a flight over Melbourne, rising to a height of 6000 feet. Passing over Port Melbourne he dropped his card as a farewell to his comrade on the Orontes, but whether the card, which was weighted, fell on the deck of the steamer or into the bay, he is unable to say. Lieut Treloar described the atmosphere as misty over the city, but clearer further out. He had a fine view of Portarlington, Corio, and Mornington, but could not see the Heads. He dropped the machine to 4000 feet on the way back, and finished the trip with a nice spiral to the ground near the aerodrome at Point Cook. Lieut Treloar has made 20 flights in the Bristol, Bleriot, and British experimental machines, and has been uniformly successful, and has carried 12 passengers at different times. Lieut Treloar returned to Melbourne to-day, carrying with him the best wishes of many friends for his future career. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Mon 19 Apr 1915 (p.4): PERSONAL ITEMS Lieutenant H. Treloar, of the Australian Aviation Corps, was married at Christ Church Cathedral on Saturday by the Very Rev Dean Lewis to Miss Lilian Hooley, daughter of the late Constable Hooley. Lieut Treloar, who leaves for India on special service this week, flew from Point Cook to Melbourne last Wednesday. Portland Guardian (Vic), Fri 23 Apr 1915 (p.2): VICTORIAN AVIATOR – Lieut. W.H. Treloar left by the mail steamer last week for India on active service. Capt. Petre, who left last week, also for India, was farewelled by Lieut. Treloar flying over the vessel and dropping his card to wish “bon voyage” to his captain. During the flight made by Lieut. Treloar he reached the height of ten thousand feet, and on returning to Point Cole [sic, Cook] made a perfect landing. Lieut. Merz, also of the Flying corps, wishing to bid good-bye to Capt. White and Lieut. Treloar, flew over the vessel, after it had left the pier, and waved good-bye signals. Lieutenant Treloar was married last Saturday to Miss L. Hooley, daughter of the late Constable Hooley of Ballarat. Lieut. Treloar is a son of Mr W.H. Treloar, commercial traveler, representing Messrs Clarke and Co., Propty, lmtd. and is well known in this district. This is the second son Mr Treloar has serving his country in this war. His son Jack left with the first contingent. As the Treloar family are well known in this district many will be pleased to hear of their success. The Sun (Sydney, NSW), Sun 25 Apr 1915 (p.9): MILITARY OFFICERS – APPOINTMENTS APPROVED MELBOURNE, Saturday The following appointments to the Australian Imperial Force have been approved: – FLYING CORPS To be second-lieutenants: Second-lieutenant G.P. Merz, Melbourne University Rifles; Second-lieutenant W.H. Treloar, 70th Infantry (Ballarat Regiment). Hamilton Spectator (Vic) Tue 13 Jul 1915 (p.4): FLYING VISIT TO EDEN Lieutenant Harold Treloar, the eldest son of Mr W.H. Treloar, a former storekeeper in Hamilton, has been achieving distinction as a member of the Royal Australian Flying Corps in the Turkish region. “I flew over the Garden of Eden, too, according to what I am told by the people here,” says Lieutenant Harold Treloar, writing on June 3rd from Busra, at the junction of the Tigris and Euphrates near the shore of the Persian Gulf. Everything is O.K. We have two Maurice-Farman fighting biplanes going, and I have been over the Turkish lines at Kurna [aka Qurnah], acting as pilot and observer. We fly at 5000 feet, so if they hit us, good luck to them. These machines carry a passenger and fuel for four hours, and do a little less than 60 miles an hour ground speed. We have dropped bombs, but with little success. But we have done some good reconnaissance, locating trenches, guns and so forth. [We advance to Barham Island to-morrow, and start a new depot there. (from same letter different paper)] It is fearfully hot, about 110 to 120 degrees in the shade, and when there is no breeze it is simply a real Turkish bath. I was the first Australian member of the Australian Flying Corps to fly over the enemy’s lines, and also the first Australian to fly in this country. All our corps are well and standing the heat well.” Lieutenant Treloar resided in Hamilton for some years with his parents, and later was selected with several others to undergo a course of instruction in aviation in England. He became efficient, and later returned to Australia, here obtaining a commission with the Royal Australian Flying Corps, with which he went to the front. The Horsham Times (Vic), Tue 13 Jul 1915 (p.5): A FLYER FROM HORSHAM Most Horshamites will remember Mr Harold Treloar, who was the first man to drive a motor car for Messrs Young Bros. in Horsham, and who now is a lieutenant in the Australian Flying Corps. ……………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/72975768 The Horsham Times (Vic), Tue 20 Jul 1915 (p.6): LIEUTENANT HAROLD TRELOAR A Ballarat resident received the following interesting letter from Flight-Lieutenant Harold Treloar, formerly of Horsham, who is with the Flying Corps “somewhere” in the East. He writes: – “Just a few lines to tell you how things are going up this way. Owing to the aeroplanes we were able to locate all Turkish trenches and guns and then our artillery made things much too hot for them to hold, and eventually they simply got panic-stricken and fled. Where they made their last stand you could pick up their shells and bullets by the handful, and there were shell holes every few yards. I have been on reconnaissance trips up to 10 miles from our base, taking nearly two hours to do the trip. We followed up the retreat, and saw no forces left to ambush our troops, and some are now 90 miles further on. There we propose to rest as long as possible. We fly at 5000 and 6000 feet, and can see miles away. We get no other war news, and we miss it very much. This is a very flat country, and is flooded for miles in every direction. I dare say you have read of the river Tigris. It is very large. I am not at liberty to say very much. It is very hot here, but cooler at night. Lower down the river it was nearly as hot in the night as in the day, and sleep was impossible.” The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Fri 6 Aug 1915 (p.1): A BOMB DROPPER – LIEUT TRELOAR WRITES INTERESTINGLY SOME NARROW ESCAPES Lieut W. Harold Treloar, the Ballarat aviator, on active service at the Persian Gulf with the Australian Flying Corps, writes a member of the “Echo” reporting staff, under date June 25, as follows: – “Just a line to let you know I am still in the land of the living, and going strong. Had several exciting times lately, through engine failure, mainly through the heat making the oil inefficient. “I had to come down in the desert, stay there all day till they sent out a strong party to guard the machine, and I thought it best to stay there, for I am sure the Arabs would have destroyed the machine. On a later occasion the engine stopped when we were over water, and it took me all my time to coax it back to our island base. The Arabs shoot at us repeatedly, but so far they have not registered on us. I have been given the piloting of No.1 Maurice Farman biplane, fitted with bomb droppers, but have not seen any large Turkish force yet to try my hand. The previous pilot and now my observer (Mjr Rielly) dropped a few, but we did not do much damage; but have proved immense value for reconnaissance purposes. I have flown about 900 miles, and not so fare felt any ill-effects, but it is a strain, for the wind here is so strong at times that we fly only about 20 feet or so from the ground to make any headway at all; in fact, at one place we have been blown backwards. A noticeable thing is the number of Swallow and Ariell’s biscuit, jam, and fruit tins around the camps previously held by the Turks. Lately I did 115 miles in 1 hour 20 minutes, which shows what you can do when the wind is in your favor. It is rather hot. So far I have been in splendid health, but many mechanics have been ill. It is peculiar to see the various modes of locomotion in the deserts about here – donkeys, camels, horses, etc. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Sat 14 Aug 1915 (p.4): FLYING MAN’S LETTER – HAROLD TRELOAR WRITES The following letter, received by Senator Blakey, has been received by us for publication: – Aviation Park, Busra, July 12, 1915 Dear Sir, – Just a line or two to tell you that the Australian Flying Corps, in conjunction with the Indian Flying Corps, have done some good work here, and there are prospects of more to come. Captain Petre (A.F.C.) and myself have charge of the two Maurice Farman aeroplanes here. They are two-seated machines, and we are the pilots. We expect some more machines soon. Several times we have been under fire, but so far nothing has touched any of our machines. Our greatest trouble is the heat, which affects the engines greatly, and once lately I was let down in hostile country early in the morning, but got away later, when we affected some repairs. The heat is very bad, and some of the men are suffering from it, but after the next couple of months, I believe, it gets much cooler weather. – Yours faithfully, H. TRELOAR, Lieut A.F.C. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic), Tue 21 Sept 1915 (p.4): MISSING AVIATOR LIEUT HAROLD TRELOAR Keen regret was felt by his friends to-day, when it became known that Lieut Harold Treloar, the Ballarat aviator, was posted as missing from the base at the Persian Gulf. News to this effect has reached Mrs Treloar per official telegram. Lieut Treloar will go down in history as Ballarat’s first aviator. He made a creditable showing last year, when he won his certificate as an aviator after three weeks’ tuition at Brooklands (England), and on returning to Ballarat just after the war broke out he obtained a commission as lieutenant of the 70th Regiment, and was later given an appointment in the Australian Aviation Corps at the Point Cook aerodrome. He was accepted for active service in the Persian Gulf four months ago, and he preceded the late Lieut G. Merz to the front. His friends are hopeful that he has not shared Lieut Merz’s fate, that of falling into the hands of the Arabs with fatal results. Lieut Treloar was married prior to his departure for the front to a daughter of the late Constable Hooley, of Redan. Page 30 of Service Record: Extract from a Statement of Prisoner of War – Captain Muhammad Ali, 105th Turkish Infantry. Basrah, 13th October 15 Captain R.F. Atkins, Lieut Treloar He was present when our two aviation officers were examined and was also close to the river on the right bank when the aeroplane came down and watched the whole thing with glasses. The machine came down quite slowly and bumped once or twice gently on the ground before it stopped. At first the officers tried to make a bolt for it, but saw it was impossible and returned to the machine. They were both unhurt. After they (the Turks) had taken the two officers from the machine our (British) guns opened fire on it and tried to smash it, whereupon they (the Turks) led one of them (the officers) back in its direction and the guns ceased fire, and they (the Turks) were then able to get it away. The two officers were treated with every courtesy and were sent to Baghdad by steamer. Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, Thur 28 Oct 1915, Issue 133 (p.2738): ROYAL FLYING CORPS – MILITARY WING The following appointments are made – Flying Officers – Captain HENRY PETRE, Australian Permanent Forces. Dated 1st May, 1915 Captain THOMAS W. WHITE, Australian Citizen Forces. Dated 11th May 1915 Lieutenant WILLIAM H. TRELOAR, Australian Citizen Forces. Dated 11th May 1915 Lieutenant GEORGE F. MERZ, Australian Flying Corps. Dated 5th June, 1915 Hamilton Spectator (Vic), Mon 20 Dec 1915 (p.4): A PRISONER OF WAR The friends of Lieutenant Treloar, one of the Australian aviators with the British force in Mesopotamia, were somewhat concerned as to his fate, when he was compelled to descend within enemy lines. Subsequently the commander of the British troops received a note from the Turkish commander saying that Lieutenant Treloar was in their hands, was “all right,” and had dined with the Turkish commander the night the note was sent. Confirmation of this intelligence has been received by the Minister for Defence in a cable message from India, as follows: – “Latest information received in this case is that Lieutenant Treloar was not injured on September 16, and was sent to Bagdad in safety.” Lieutenant Treloar is a son of Mr W. Treloar, formerly of Hamilton. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Wed 26 Jan 1916 (p.1): CAPTAIN W.H. TRELOAR Capt W.H. Treloar, who is a prisoner of war in Turkey, having been captured in the Mesopotamia campaign, through having to make a forced descent in an aeroplane in which he was making observations, has been able to transmit a message to his wife, who is living with her mother, Mrs Hooley, in Skipton street Ballarat. The letter is written in French, and is to the effect that his health is good, that he is being well treated, and there is no need for his wife to be troubled as to his welfare. The letter was written from Mosul, where he had been interned. The Captain stated that he expected to be sent almost immediately to Stamboul. The communication was dated 16th October last, and had come via the French Mail Agency established in Switzerland for the transmission of letters from prisoners of war, which explained the use of the French language by the prisonered aviator. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Tue 30 May 1916 (p.7): PRISONER IN TURKEY LETTER FROM CAPTAIN TRELOAR BEAUFORT, Monday – Captain H. Treloar, an Australian aviator, who was taken prisoner by the Turks several months ago, has forwarded a postcard to Mr J.R. Wotherspoon, of Beaufort, who employed him as a motor-driver some years ago. The card is dated 11/3/16, and came via Geneva. Captain Treloar states: – “I am a prisoner of war at Aleppo. We are fairly well treated. The climate is good. We are quartered at the Hotel American. Life is very interesting. Best wishes.” RC W & M file: https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1478822 Letter dated 4/5/1917 Seraskerat Prison, Constantinople: Dear Miss Chomley, I have received your letter dated 22nd March and thank you for contents. I am pleased to have the question of rank definitely settled. Ever since my capture I had been addressed as Captain, and even now I receive heaps of letters bearing that rank. Unfortunatley, I had been captured before I had done anything meriting promotion, and therefore I more or less understood that it was probably a mistake. Recently I had reason to write to Sir George Reid, I wonder if you could find out if he received my letter safely, the contents concerned the case of the reprisal I am undergoing with the four other English Officers, and asking him if he could do anything to better our condition. Re parcels, I have written you a few days ago advising you in my case to do as you have done, it is much better. Thanking you, Yours faithfully, Lieut. W.H. Treloar, Australian Flying Corps P.S. Kindest remembrances to Mr Sinclair. The Horsham Times (Vic), Fri 3 Aug 1917 (p.4): A PRISONER OF WAR Amongst the prisoners of war in Turkey is Lieutenant Harold Treloar, formerly of Horsham, who holds a commission in the Royal Flying Corps. Writing to Warrant-Officer Kirkwood, of the 70th Infantry Regiment, Ballarat, to which he belonged, he enquires after the welfare of his fellow officers, and specially mentioned Major Lazarus and Dr Hardy. “Unfortunately,” he adds, “owing to the alleged ill-treatment of five Turkish officers in Egypt by our people, I am one of five placed in prison, and am having a pretty rotten time as a reprisal; but expect to be sent back to our camp shortly.” He sends his best wished to all Ballarat friends, and expresses a hope that they will write, although he advises them not to send money or parcels. The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW), Sat 22 Mar 1919 (p.3): A PRISONER OF THE TURKS AUSTRALIAN’S EXPERIENCES Lieutenant Harold Treloar, of the Australian Flying Corps, who was for three years and two months a prisoner of war in the hands of the Turks, recently returned to Melbourne on board the Aeneas. He tells an interesting story. “I left Melbourne,” Lieutenant Treloar says, “on April 20, 1915, with Captain T.W. White and a ‘half flight,’ consisting 41 men. We went to Mesopotamia via Colombo and Bombay, and joined up with a half flight of the Indian Army at Busra. We were subsequently attached to the 6th Division, under General Townshend. The machines we had were all out of date – Maurice Farman, Caudron, and Martinside Scouts – and we had a great deal of engine trouble owing to the heat. “Three and a half months after landing in Mesopotamia I was taken prisoner, together with Captain B.S. Atkins, of the Indian Army, at Essin, south of Kut-el-Amara. We were the first two officers to be captured in Mesopotamia after 11 months fighting. Our capture while on aerial reconnaissance was due to engine trouble, which forced us to descend about 80 yards in front of the Turkish trenches. They opened fire on us with machine guns and rifles, and, though the firing was kept up for 10 to 15 minutes, we were both captured unhurt. Until the Turkish officers came up to us, we had a hand-to-hand fight with the Arabs, who would have killed us but for the intervention of the Turks. We were stripped and taken before the Turkish commander, Nurredin Pasha, who told us that if we did not give him all the information he desired we would be shot. I asked him if he would tell the British anything if he were a prisoner. He answered ‘No,’ and did not continue the questioning, but gave us coffee and cigarettes. We were very surprised later to get tea and biscuits made in Melbourne. “Captain Atkins and I were subsequently sent by river steamer to Bagdad. At every town or village along the river the Arab Sheik with his followers, came on board to look at us and at our 80 h.p. Caudron biplane, which had been riddled with rifle and shrapnel bullets. On our arrival in Bagdad, the machine was exhibited for the benefit of the Red Crescent – the Turkish equivalent of our Red Cross. We were royally received in Bagdad. Fully 50 officers came on board to see us, and crowds of people lined the banks of the Tigris. We entered the ‘Abode of Peace,’ once the most brilliant city in the Moslem world, with flags flying, and the steamer’s whistle blowing. We were put in a large hospital, and a strong guard was placed over us. We were given permission to buy clothes and to have a bath, a real Turkish bath. The director of the Red Crescent was very kind to us, and saw that we received good food. The commandant, Huckle Bey, took us for several drives, but, as he could not get any information out of us, the drives were discontinued. After remaining 10 days in Bagdad, where we were treated with the utmost kindness and civility, we were sent to Stamboul, by way of Mosul. The party that accompanied us to Mosul consisted of 15 Indian sepoys and a guard of 20 mounted gendarmes, with one officer. The Indians travelled in open carts, but we were given an Arabarner, a closed carriage, in which you lie down. The officer in charge could speak a little French, so we were able to find out a little about the country we travelled through. After two days we reached Samara, and Tickereet was our next halting place. The Germans have done a great deal of excavation work about here, and have secured a great number of valuable relics. While in Tickereet we met some Turks, about 1000 men, with their officers, going down to Bagdad in rafts. When they heard we were Australians they expressed surprise, saying that they thought Australians were black. They seemed very optimistic about recapturing Busra. On our arrival at Mosul we were handed over to the military authorities, and placed in an old dirty barracks. From now on their treatment of us changed for the worse. It was winter, and the very small room in which we were confined had bare floors. The windows had no glass, and, to keep warm, we had to huddle together in a corner. After a few days, Captain Atkins became very ill with dysentery and fever. We could not eat the hotel food, because of its oiliness and filth, and we lived for a few weeks on boiled fowl and rice. “About six weeks after our arrival in Mosul, Captain T.W. White and Captain Yeats Brown, both of the Australian Flying Corps, joined us. They had been taken prisoner near Bagdad. Shortly afterwards Major Reilly, our flight commander, and Lieutenant Fulton arrived. Thus by the irony of fate six flying officers who had messed together at Busra were now prisoners of war. Two others, also messmates of our (Lieutenant Burns, of New Zealand, and Lieutenant Merz, of Ballarat), came down near Abu Salibihk, but, unfortunately, there were no Turks near them, and they were killed by Arabs. “The treatment of our men in Mosul was indescribable. They had very little food, very few clothes, and no bedding except one grass mat. Deaths occurred every day, and all our attempts to secure better treatment for the men failed. Major Reilly was told that if he interfered he would be sent elsewhere. Our men were knocked about for the most trivial excuse, and I saw one man beaten for trying to wash himself in a puddle in the yard. They were given hardly enough water to drink, and some had not had either a wash or a bath for two or three months, although the river was not 200 yards from the prison. The cells were swarming with vermin. Some men who arrived at the prison in a very weak state were allowed to lie in the yard, and, as they could not move, some of us asked to be allowed to carry the men to the hospital. Our request was agreed to, but the men were not allowed into the hospital, being left outside in the cold, with the result that almost every one of them died. “You can imagine our joy when, after five months, we heard that we were to be sent to Aleppo. Our great trouble was to get cash as nobody would accept Turkish notes. The German consul finally changed some of our notes thus enabling us to pay our debts and to give the men a little money to spend en route. The few German officers we met in Turkey were very good to us. Two hundred men were sent with us from Mosul, but only 30 arrived at Aleppo. Here we were allowed to stay at the Hotel America, the nearest approach to civilization we had experienced since our capture. After spending 10 days in Aleppo we again entrained for a destination unknown. On our way we passed through Marmure, Tersus, and Byzanti, finally reaching Afion Karahissar, where we were placed in an empty house which was new and clean. That same night three British officers escaped from another house, with the result that we were placed in an Armenian church with all the other British, French, and Russian prisoners. The treatment we received here was good. Moreover we began to hear talk of peace. Our evenings were spent in attending our ‘theatre’ or else in mock trials and debates. “In March, 1917, in company with four other British officers, I was sent to Constantinople, as a reprisal for alleged mistreatment of five Turkish officers in Cairo. We were placed in a filthy underground cell for 63 days, no exercise whatever being allowed. Captain Brodie contracted jaundice, and when, after many refusals, he was finally admitted to the hospital, he died. After 101 days we were released owing to the efforts of the American consul, and were allowed to return to Afion Karahissar, where we remained till the signing of the armistice. “Thanks to the Australian Red Cross Society and the Royal Flying Corps Aid Committee we received many parcels, but I think only about 30 per cent of those sent. We wish particularly to thank the Australian Red Cross Society for the good food and clothing sent to us, and also for the manner in which they endeavoured to do anything we asked of them. We desire also to thank the Misses Ross, of Auburn, and the Misses Davies, of Footscray, for their kind letters and parcels of warm stockings.” The Pioneers: R.G. Carey (1874 – 1959): https://www.ctie.monash.edu/hargrave/carey.html “Carey's private aerodrome at Port Melbourne, became the roost from which the chickens of Australian commercial aviation emanated to carry names such as ANA, East-West, Ansett, and Qantas, across Australian and international skies. On March 16, 1919, Carey and the then Mayor of Essendon, Ald. Arthur Fenton, purchased four obsolete Maurice Farman Shorthorn biplanes from the Department of Defence (Point Cook). Carey dubbed them 'Carey's Chickens', which he had derived from the legendary Stormy Petrels, known as 'Mother Carey's Chickens'. RGC's application of this name to his aircraft at the time of their delivery to Port Melbourne arose from references to Carey as 'The Stormy Petrel' because of his storm defying flight over Adelaide in the Bleriot, October 1917. Part of the Farman acquisition deal was a conversion course to fly Farmans for the purchasing pilot with Lieutenant WH Treloar to be the instructor. A quiet achiever, Harold Treloar was one of the AFC's most experienced pilots who had been posted during WWI to the Mesopotamian Half Flight. Forced down by a faulty engine, he and his Indian Army observer were captured and given a rough time by the Arabs and Turks as prisoners of war. RGC and Treloar became good friends during Carey's instruction on operation and maintenance of the Farmans. Treloar and three other Central Flying School pilots delivered the Farmans from Point Cook to the refurbished landing ground at Port Melbourne on Saturday, April 11, 1919.” Geelong Advertiser (Vic), Fri 25 Apr 1919 (p.2): COMMERCIAL AVIATION When pressed to give an account of his flight from the Breakwater Common to Point Cook, which he made on Monday evening, Mr J.F. Guthrie said: – “I know Messrs Carey and Fenton deserve credit for pioneering commercial aviation in Victoria. They have bought four Morris Farnham [sic] machines from the Government, and have engaged a competent staff of pilots and mechanics, and are prepared to contract to take one almost anywhere, and in the meantime are being more or less rushed by people desiring to have a bit of a fly round, as several of us did in Geelong on Saturday and Monday. I had never previously flown, and after a trial flight with Mr Treloar round about the common I was more fortunate in being asked by that experienced pilot to accompany him back to the Point Cook aerodrome in the evening as his guest. We mounted the Morris Farnham 80 horse-power machine at 5.15 p.m., and were soon up 3000 feet, which gave me a magnificent view of Geelong and suburbs, as we crossed over the north end of Moorabool-street, then skirting the shore and passing between the Grammar School and Avalon Homestead at a height of 4000 feet and travelling 70 miles an hour – I was interested in watching two Grammar School eights having a practice spin on the lagoon and later in spying out the lay of the land and the wonderfully modelled metropolitan sewage farm – after a beautifully smooth uneventful flight Mr Treloar effected a perfect landing, following three spiral dives from 4000 feet. Upon my remarking how slowly we appeared to travel I was informed that we had averaged 65 miles an hour. It was a perfect evening, and I greatly enjoyed the magnificent panoramic view and the experience. I have promised to make a flight to N.S.W. with the same pilot during the next few months. The only part that I did not enjoy after long day, which included swimming, a somewhat rough motor cycle trip, and in all 50 miles in an aeroplane, was bumping home at night without an overcoat in a slow old Ford motor, which after a Morris Farnham stunt reminded me of a rough old four wheeler cab doing about five miles an hour. With our climate and great distances there is a wonderful future for aviation in Australia, and flying to Sydney will soon be as common as motoring there. I forgot to mention that Mr Treloar was a lieutenant in the Australian Aviation Corps, and was for three years a prisoner in Turkey, and also that I was most hospitably entertained at Point Cook by Major Geer and his wife. ………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165251817 The Age (Melb, Vic), Tue 20 May 1919 (p.10): TRELOAR V TRELOAR William Harold Treloar, 29, motor mechanic, Boyd-street, Middle Park, sued for divorce from Alice Lilian Treloar, 23, on the ground of misconduct. Mr R. Marten appeared for petitioner, who said he married respondent in April, 1915, and sailed for the front as a member of the Flying Corps shortly after. While in Mesopotamia he was captured by the Turks and was prisoner for three years. He returned to Melbourne early this year, and in an interview with his wife she told him that during his absence she had given birth to a child. She asked him to give her another chance and take her back. She also said she had lived at an hotel in Sydney with a man, but refused to disclose his name. He told her that it was impossible for him to overlook her conduct. Before petitioner returned, his (petitioner’s) father saw respondent, who made admissions of misconduct, and said she could no longer take allotment money from her husband’s pay. She had already received about £400. A decree nisi was granted. The Age (Melb, Vic), Fri 13 Jun 1919 (p.7): BOISTEROUS WEATHER ENCOUNTERED BALLARAT – Captain Huxley stated on arrival that at Bacchus Marsh the wind was very unsatisfactory, and it was impossible for all the machines to cross the Pentland Hills. …. Captain Huxley lost sight of the six other machines shortly after leaving Bacchus Marsh. The aviators included Captain Macnamara, V.C., Lieutenant J. Tunbridge and Lieutenant H. Treloar. The non-arrival of the full squadron caused a good deal of disappointment in Ballarat, where arrangements had been made by the mayor of the city (Cr. Hollway) to entertain the airmen. Captain Huxley travelled at an altitude of 5000 feet, and the flight from Point Cook to Ballarat occupied about two hours. …………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/155209526 The Ballarat Star (Vic), Fri 13 Jun 1919 (p.4): Flight to Ballarat – The announcement in yesterday’s issue that a team of seven aviators would fly to Ballarat from Point Cook Aviation School naturally aroused considerable local interest, and attracted a large number of people to the Miners’ racecourse, where it had been arranged that the landing would be made. Before noon Mr A. Tunbridge, father of Lieut. J. Tunbridge, who was one of the party, learnt by telephone from Point Cook that the seven aviators, comprising Capt. McNamara, Lieut. Tunbridge, Lieuts. Huxley, Treloar, Miller, Tregellis, and Shepherd, had started on the journey. On a calm day, or with a tail wind, the journey would have been accomplished in 40 minutes, but allowing for the head wind it was considered that the expected time of arrival would not be adhered to. ……………………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212644020 Melton Express (Vic), Sat 12 Jul 1919 (p.2): VISITING AEROPLANES The Ceres correspondent of the Ballarat “Star” says – Ceres Methodists claim to be the first to have welcomed flying worshippers. Amongst the congregation on Sunday were Flight Lieut Treloar and Mr S.J. Hipper, who left Manifold Heights a few minutes after 10.30 and were amongst the first to take seats in Ceres Church. They had a particularly hard buffeting going; they landed in a paddock adjoining the Temperance Hall after being ten minutes in the air. The gale was so strong that at times the biplane was stationary. Returning with the wind, the four miles were covered in two minutes. The Rev. A. Hambly was the preacher, and remarked that it was not often one had amongst his congregation “those who had flown to church.” Application for Assistance (lodged 28/7/1919 with Dept of Repatriation): Treloar, Lord, and Lonsdale (Richard) APPLICATION FOR £400 TO PURCHASE A Dodge commercial vehicle to be used for transport of aeroplane Hangar and Spare parts to various towns. Memo from applicant Treloar undated – In company with 1st class Air Mechanic Lord & Flight Sergt. Lonsdale I have bought a DeHaviland Aeroplane from the Defence Dept. for which we paid £500 cash. Our intention is to tour Victoria, giving a passenger flights & exhibitions. Our equipment is complete except for 1 Motor Van for transport. This is extremely necessary as I have found while flying for Messrs Carey Fenton (for whom I have taken up 270 passengers at Footscray, Port Melbourne, Geelong & Colac) We need transport for our Aeroplane hanger, petrol, oil and personal gear. The Dodge Van is the most suitable for this work. It will cost £400. https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=155948 The Ballarat Star (Vic), Mon 11 Aug 1919 (p.2): SUCCESSFUL AIR FLIGHTS – MILITARY AVIATORS TRIPS BENDIGO REACHED IN 72 MINUTES Bendigo, Saturday Flight-Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, pre-war pilot, and for 38 months a prisoner of war in Turkey, accompanied by Flight-Sergeant R. Lonsdale, M.M., made a flight from Melbourne to Bendigo to-day in 72 minutes in one of the latest De Haviland 100 horse-power bi-planes. Leaving Essendon at 9 a.m., the aviators made a good landing at the Epsom Racecourse at 10.12 a.m. As far as Macedon the weather was clear, but from there to Bendigo it was foggy and cloudy, and the steering had to be done by the compass. Bendigo was not observed until the machine was over the city. The flight was carried out up to a maximum height of 4000 feet. Flight-Lieutenant Treloar will remain in Bendigo for a few days, and passenger flights probably will be undertaken. The Age (Melb, Vic), Wed 13 Aug 1919 (p.13): BENDIGO Flight-Lieutenant Treloar, who last week made a flight from Essendon to Bendigo by aeroplane, had a busy time on Tuesday afternoon, when he made several midday excursions with passengers, and finished up with a trip over the city, returning to the starting point on the racecourse at Epsom. The flights aroused much interest, and were witnessed by crowds of people who assembled in the main streets and other points of vantage in the city. The Horsham Times (Vic), Tue 26 Aug 1919 (p.4): AVIATOR COMPLETES FLIGHT Flight-Lieut W.H. Treloar (formerly of Horsham), who proceeded to Bendigo by aeroplane a fortnight ago, is now at Deniliquin, having flown the final stage from Echuca, 45 miles, in 38 minutes. He carried a passenger on each stage throughout the journey from Melbourne to Deniliquin. His net flying time for the 201 miles was 158 minutes. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Sat 20 Sept 1919 (p.17): MARRIAGES TELOAR – TREWIN – On the 23rd August, 1919, at Echuca, by the Rev Rogers, ex-Flight-Lieutenant William Harold, A.F.C., eldest son of Mr and Mrs W.H. Treloar, 17 Boyd street, Albert Park, to Ida Emmerson, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs H. Trewin, 47 Finlay street, Albert Park. The Border Morning Mail and Riverina Times (Albury, NSW), Sat 27 Sept 1919 (p.5): AERIAL FLIGHTS Last evening ex-Flight Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, A.F.C., who arrived in Albury by aeroplane on Thursday with a passenger from Junee, Mr Brereton, stated that he did not think he would be able to make any passenger flights in Albury owing to there being no suitable landing place. That day he had inspected a number of suggested places, but the paddocks were all too small, whilst round the sides were a number of fairly tall trees. The racecourse does not lend itself to a good landings, that is, for the purpose of making passenger flights, owing to numerous holes in the ground, and also because of the trees on the course proper and on all boundaries. But, explains Lieutenant Treloar, the race course could be made an ideal aerodrome at comparatively little expense by levelling off the ground and by removing those trees that are at present a source of danger. If it were possible to cut down some of the trees in the adjoining paddocks, it would make the racecourse as a landing and starting place all the better. “All that is required for an aerodrome is a paddock about 400 yards square without any high trees in the vicinity,” continued Lieut. Treloar. “If it were a circle it would make no difference. At Wagga the racecourse was a fine landing place, because there was plenty of open space, and there were also several fine entrances between the trees surrounding the course. At Deniliquin the country lent itself admirably for aeroplaning, and so level was the land and so free of obstacles, such as trees, that one could land there safely with his eyes closed. I might say that I have been asked if I would accept the position of one of the pilots in the new Aerial Transport Company, which intends running large aeroplanes between the capital cities. And if the people of Albury wish to see this town made one of the halting places, then it behoves them to move in the matter right away, and see that an aerodrome is provided. ……………………………….. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/109856707 The Age (Melb, Vic), Wed 29 Oct 1919 (p.9): Remarkable Flying Feat 3000 MILES AND 400 PASSENGERS The perfect stability of modern aeroplanes and their safety as passenger carriers has just been amply demonstrated by Flight-Lieutenant W.H. Treloar and First Class Air Mechanic H.F. Lord, who left Essendon on 11th August and returned there at 4 p.m. yesterday, after completing a tour which covered 3000 miles. During the tour the plane visited Echuca, Deniliquin, Hay, Wagga and many other towns. It took up at different stages an aggregate of 400 passengers, and had no mishaps whatever, nor engine trouble of any kind. This constitutes a record in Australian aviation. The machine used was a De Haviland 6, fitted with a 90 h.p. “Raf” engine. The return flight from Benalla occupied 84 minutes, the machine being favored with a northerly wind. Amongst those who took the air were Rev. Dr. Anderson, Bishop of Riverina; Mr and Mrs Leigh Falkiner, Mr Frank Guthrie (who has become addicted to flying), Mr. Thos. Ellis, Mr Sugden, and the mayors and mayoresses of various municipalities. Messrs Treloar and Lord are taking the machine to Belmont Common, Geelong, where they intend to flit about the Western district. Geelong Advertiser (Vic), Thur 30 Oct 1919 (p.2): AEROPLANE AGAIN VISITS GEELONG https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165404384 The Ballarat Star (Vic), Sat 13 Dec 1919 (p.4): Passenger Flights – A successful flight to Ballarat from Lismore was carried out yesterday by Lieut W.H. Treloar, who has probably executed more flights than any other Ballarat aviator. He reached Ballarat on his 100 h.p. military type De Haviland biplane, with Mr T. Haslem (of Loveland and Haslem) as passenger, at about half past 9 o’clock, having covered the 40 miles in 28 minutes. Lieut. Treloar is a partner of ex-1st Class Air Mechanic H.F. Lord in the ownership of the machine, which was purchased from the Defence Department, and during the past four months the aviators have visited 34 towns in Northern Victoria and Southern Riverina, and have flown 6000 miles, taking aloft more than 700 passengers in the four months. At Lismore, during the past few days, 25 passengers enjoyed flights, and among them were Mrs Oman, wife of the Minister of Agriculture, and Mr Edward Currie, the well-known pastoralist. Messrs Treloar and Lord, who are proud of their machine and its steadiness and reliability, are advertising five-minute flights from the Miners’ Racecourse at £2/2/, and flights may be arranged on the course. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Tue 16 Dec 1919 (p.2): PERSONAL Lieut. W. Harold Treloar, who is in Ballarat with aeroplane lately purchased from the Defence Department, was for some years resident in Ballarat. He is probably the first Ballarat boy to take up aviation. A motor engineer, he proceeded to England at his own expense in April, 1914, to study aviation, and was so apt a pupil that he quickly passed through the Bristol and Bleriot schools of aviation, being awarded the Royal Aero Club’s certificate of competency after three weeks’ tuition. Within six months of his leaving Ballarat he was home again, and in the meantime the war had broken out. In the hope of getting away to the front as a military aviator he joined the 70th Regiment, Ballarat, as a lieutenant, and passing through the Point Cook aerodrome in March, 1915, he proceeded to the Persian Gulf, where he lost his mate, Lieut G.P. Merz, who was killed by Arabs, and was himself later made prisoner by the Turks, and kept in confinement for the rest of the war period. The fact that Mr Treloar has made about 700 flights in the past four months without mishap proves him to be a reliable flier. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Tue 30 Dec 1919 (p.2): FLIGHT THROUGH SPACE TEN MINUTES IN THE AIR WITH PILOT TRELOAR (By M. McCallum) “Fly with Lieut. Treloar 2 p.m.,” such was the startling entry opposite the writer’s name in the duty book, representing one of the duties for which I was cast yesterday as a member of the reporting staff of “The Star.” Certainly the fixture had an uncommon aspect, somewhat of a variation of the humdrum life of the average reporter, the gamut of whose experiences week in and week out seldom ranges beyond the description of a violently exciting game of bowls or the effort to faithfully record the plain speaking of Crs. A. Bell and J.T. Walker at a City Council meeting. But there the entry stood, there was no mistaking the significance of it, and the more one studied it the blacker seemed the letters until one almost fancied the chief of staff leaned heavily on his pen as he labored through the responsibility of casting a possibly useful colleague for a hazardous task. To spring an undertaking like that at short notice upon a journalist accustomed in the past to gathering news merely on terra firma seemed rather over the odds. One had little or no time in which to add a few hundreds to his life insurance policy, to consult the Workers’ Compensation Act, or to make a farewell call upon a few dear friends before making an upward plunge into space that might possibly be his last. To be cast for such a mission as flying with an aviator to provide some entertaining “copy” for the multitude to read is all very well – for the reader – but to think of the possibilities of the failure of (1) the aviator, (2) the machine, (3) the atmosphere, and even (4) the passengers nerves, the thoughts were overwhelming. And in the event of tragedy to imagine a descriptive account by “one who was there,” of “everything in the garden being lovely,” having to be replaced by a half-column article captioned by sensational stirring headlines were even more disturbing to the pressman’s peace of mind. Thoughts such as these certainly took all the ginger out of one, but, I am thankful to say, they were alternated with some optimistic feelings, prompted by recalling the fine record of the pilot, and the fact that nearly 750 flights in all weathers and climes, and with persons of all weights – from featherweights to ponderous persons of the type of the man who gave up his seat in the tramcar to two ladies, had been successfully undertaken by ex-Lieut. W.H. Treloar without one untoward incident. So with feelings of hope and confidence uppermost as the fateful hour of 2 p.m. drew nigh I cycled to the Miners’ Racecourse, which I reached actually five minutes before the appointed time. In fact, so hopeful of a successful issue of my effort to get an upper hand of nature had I become, I did not even conjure the hope that some minor mishap whilst cycling to the “jumping off” place be sufficient to put me out of the fight, or flight. When at length the 100 h.p. Havilland which Messrs Treloar and Lord had acquired from the Defence Department was mounted a bracing up of the nervous composition was essayed with some measure of success. The …… the air valve, opened the throttle and switched off, very much as he would have acted were we in a motor-car setting out on a 20 mile spin to the country. The mechanic then pulled the engine over the propeller, the engine thereby imbibing a necessary supply of petrol gas to be followed by asking the pilot for “contact,” giving the propeller a smart turn, whereat the engine began to run. Gradually its slow motion gave way to a speedier action until the speed-counter showed 1600 revolution of the propeller per minute. There was now a real business-like hum of the engine, the machine meanwhile being turned face to face with the wind – and a fairly blustery south-easterly was blowing at the moment. A short run of 50 yards was made with motive power, supplied alone by the now rapidly revolving propeller clearing the atmosphere, and acting secondary to the engine, which had no direct connection with the wheels as in the case of a motor-car for instance. When there was no longer contact with Mother Earth, which began to slip away from one – we were actually flying. The sensation for the moment was exhilarating. Here was the landscape rapidly widening out before us, yet the landmarks and other objects were diminishing in proportion. Steadily we mounted into space, and the victory over nature and all preconceived laws of gravitation seemed complete. Like a panorama Lake Wendouree came into view, but a muchly shrunk sheet of water as it spread out before us to what we would feel were we to revert to our rowing days, propelling a boat against the wind in a dead “sea” over a course of 1 1-8 miles. As we wheeled around, side on to the breeze, the machine seemed remarkably steady, and there was nothing approaching the sensation felt aboard a yacht heeling over to starboard (I hope I will be pardoned by expert yachtsmen if I make a technical error in my terms of description). I have at times on a yacht put every ounce of pressure on the side of the boat, in the hope of “righting” it, but there was no such impulse prompting me yesterday. I was quite satisfied that the now wonderful de Havilland would be found perfectly horizontal were I to place a carpenter’s spirit-level along her wings. With a wide sweep round to the west, I was able to take in at a glance the southern country as far as the approaches to Buninyong and Napoleons, so far as the lowland marks were concerned. Mounts Buninyong and Warrenheip were, of course, rising up majestically to the east and south-east, conspicuous objects against the blue expanse. Then, as we wheeled around to the north, Mounts Elephant and Emu, and units in the Great Divide, came into view on the horizon, while the glistening waters of Burrumbeet and Learmonth fascinated the eye momentarily – one had no time to dwell on any particular features of landscape, but had to mentally imbibe as much of all four points of the compass as possible as time, as well as the machine, was fleeting rapidly. Then the great City of Ballarat lay beneath us. By this time we were, on authority of Pilot Treloar, 1200 feet above the earth, for we had been mounting yard by yard with nothing more of a sensation of negotiation floor after floor of a large metropolitan building in a smooth gliding lift. We did not travel far enough northerly to play “eyedrop” over the heart of the city. My sense of direction, or idea of bearings, suggested that we were about over Eyre or Urquhart streets, for the lake and the Miners’ racecourse lay on either side of us, as we made a turn easterly in the course of completing our circular flight. The lake might have been a sheet of water in circumference one mile, instead of a lake of 3½ or 4 miles round as it is, and the Miners’ racecourse a moderate paddock, instead of an enclosure of a few hundred acres. The inner enclosure of the Gun Club ground, with its club house, appeared as a cottage, with a back yard attached. Trees were as large shrubs and cottages as dog kennels, while chain wide streets were as footpaths to our vision. At the maximum of our bird’s eye view, human beings might have been poultry promenading the earth. Such were the ………………. Then our aerial cruise reached the penultimate stage – we were commencing the fascinating glide to earth, and quickly pigmy buildings became of respectable and more familiar dimensions, and land marks assumed their proper perspective. The propeller no longer raced at full speed, yet majestically and steadily we soared downwards until the earth seemed to rise up to us with something of the sensation felt by an inebriated gentleman laying his form across the footpath, but without the blow. We were now in contact with good old “mother earth,” almost before we knew it, so gently was the landing accomplished, and after a ….. such as we might experience in a motor car traversing a grass paddock we came to a dead stop – our flight had ended. As to any impressions formed of the cruise, I must declare that the sensation of mounting into space and rising upon the “billows” of a vigorous south-easterly was not as nerve-wracking as a round trip on the switch-back railway at Luna Park. I have experienced both, and I felt the thrills on the Luna Park railway the greater. I have gazed into the depths of the underworld from Govett’s Leap, Blue Mountains, and I certainly prefer the feeling of security offered by a steady biplane manipulated by a reliable pilot like Treloar. I have gazed into the coastal waters of Australia over the sides of interstate liners along the coast of five States, and undoubtedly felt the giddy or that peculiarly indescribable sensation of a raging sea wanting to engulf me, but there was no such feeling looking over the sides of the de Havilland. Summed up I should say the feeling of waiting for the command, “Next please for the joy ride,” is the worst part of the sensation. My duties have taken me to one of His Majesty’s prisons to see the supreme penalty exacted of a condemned man, and preparing to board a biplane, as the awaiting of an execution are worse phases than the experiencing or witnessing the actual thing, so apparent is the feeling and security aboard the aeroplane. Exigencies of space now call a halt, but a word of praise is due to Mr Treloar for his careful piloting and his absolute command over his machine, and also for the spic and span appearance of the engine in particular, and machine in general, the whole plane being kept in a condition reminiscent of that maintained on service, absolute care and cleanliness being ordained by military authority of the men who handle these ships of the ether. One word in conclusion, the writer’s advice to all who possess the ambition to fly is to at once see Mr J. Lyons, Bridge street, and book up a flight with Mr Treloar before he passes on to other parts; it is a chance one will not often get and there is much personal gratification in becoming possessed of a form of proof of having accomplished a flight, worded as follows: – THIS CERTIFICATE Is issued by TRELOAR AND LORD AVIATORS, (Ex-members First Flight, Aust. Flying Corps.) To show that …………………. Has made a flight in a 100 h.p. DE HAVILLAND BIPLANE Issued at Ballarat (date) (Signed) W.H. TRELOAR, Chief Pilot. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212678079 The Horsham Times (Vic), Tue 20 Jan 1920 (p.3): ACCIDENT TO AEROPLANE Lieut Treloar, who flew over Stawell in his Haviland aeroplane on Monday, met with a mishap on Tuesday morning. When passing over Ashens, a few miles beyond Lubeck, one of the connecting rods of the engine broke, and he had to descend, but he effected a safe landing in a stubble paddock. The engine has been taken out and sent to Point Cook for repairs, and it will be some time before the journey is resumed. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Sat 6 Mar 1920 (p.2): ST ARNAUD AEROPLANE’S VISIT On Friday Lieut. Treloar arrived in his 100 h.p. biplane, and is stopping over the week-end to give passenger flights. Although aeroplanes are getting quite common, and several have passed over the town of late, this is the first time a machine has actually landed in the town. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Thur 6 May 1920 (p.7): TO RACES BY AIR SKIPTON, Wednesday – Mr R.C. Bell, of Mooramong, Skipton, made an aerial trip to the Warrnambool races on Tuesday morning, piloted by Flight-Lieutenant Treloar, and accompanied by Air Mechanic Lord. He returned to Skipton by air after the meeting. The morning flight occupied 58 minutes and the return flight 62 minutes for the distance of 70 miles. The Horsham Times (Vic), Fri 14 May 1920 (p.7): RECORD OF AIRMEN Flight-Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, and Air-Mechanic Lord, who visited Horsham and districts, has concluded a series of flights, covering in all more than 15,000 miles. The machine used was a 100 h.p. De Haviland biplane, and is owned by the men themselves. During the time the plane has been in the possession of Lieutenant Treloar and Air-Mechanic Lord 1900 passengers have been carried, and only once was serious engine trouble experienced. June 1920: https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/245599112 The Herald (Melb, Vic), Tue 10 Aug 1920 (p.1): [Photo] https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242307135 https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73177288 The Herald (Melb, Vic), Sat 14 Aug 1920 (p.8): AVIATORS RETURNING BALLARAT, Saturday The Peace Loan campaigner, Flight-Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, A.F.C., returned to Point Cook today after an enforced stay at Bullarook, where on Monday he and Mechanic Sergeant C.J. Hazlitt were forced by a heavy storm to descend in a field from which owing to the soft turf they were unable to take off for some days. They were hospitably entertained by Mr and Mrs A. Wade, into whose field they descended, during their enforced stay. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Tue 17 Aug 1920 (p.8): FLYING IN HAIL AND SNOW Weather of the wildest description was encountered by Captain W.H. Treloar, who found it impossible to continue his Peace Loan tour of the north-western district of Victoria last week. “On Monday of last week,” said Captain Treloar, before leaving Point Cook this afternoon for Kyneton in order to resume his itinerary, “we headed for Clunes and Learmonth. We had a very hard time. Ballarat and district were enveloped in a thick white mist which rendered flying very difficult. The bad weather continued until Friday and our plane had to face rain, hail and snow, in addition to heavy wind. So thick was the rain at one stage that we had to descend to within 100 feet of the ground in order to pick out a paddock in which we could land.” The Age (Melb, Vic), Thur 19 Aug 1920 (p.8): AN AERIAL DERBY The aeroplane canvass of the State will terminate on Friday, 27th August, with an aerial Derby. The four Avro machines participating in the canvass, and piloted by Captain Mackenzie, Captain Treloar, Captain Matheson and Lieutenant Mustard, will fly from the Serpentine racecourse to Melbourne, a distance of 108 miles. The start will be made at 10.30 a.m., and the machines will “take off” at regular intervals of two minutes, lots having been drawn for the order of starting. …………………… The competing machines will carry mails from Serpentine for posting on arrival in Melbourne. ……………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203073064 The Horsham Times (Vic), Fri 20 Aug 1920 (p.4): TRELOAR’S AEROPLANE WRECKED The Peace Loan aeroplane landed at Kyneton at 5 o’clock on Tuesday. The ’plane, a 130 h.p. Avro, was piloted by Lieut Treloar (formerly of Horsham), with whom was Flight-Sergt. Hazelett. An unfortunate accident happened at the landing place. Sergt Hore, who was keeping back the crowd, was knocked down by one of the back wings. He was immediately motored to Dr Downing, who found that his shoulder was badly bruised, and that he was suffering from severe shock. About 10.30 a.m. on Wednesday the aeroplane was starting for Bendigo, and had risen 100 feet when the engine failed to act, and the ’plane crashed to the road, completely wrecking the machine, the aviators luckily escaping with a severe shaking. The Herald (Melb, Vic) Mon 23 Aug 1920 (p.13): The Peace Loan – AERIAL TOUR SUCCEEDS – HALF-MILLION AIMED AT “Up to date the aeroplane tour of Victoria, which has been in progress since August 9, and has been subjected to continual interruptions as a result of boisterous weather, has easily exceeded £250,000,” today declared Captain A.T. Rose, M.C., M.S.M., who is in charge of the arrangements for the tour. “Before the itinerary has been completed on Wednesday, we hope to have placed £500,000 to our credit.” Flying in the new aeroplane which was erected for him at Point Cook, Captain W.H. Treloar today set out from Melbourne to take part in the aerial campaign. He is taking over a section of the North-Eastern district, in order that the tour of that district may be completed by Wednesday. There are now four machines engaged carrying out the programme throughout Victoria. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Fri 27 Aug 1920 (p.8) Crowds Watch Finish – Seconds Between ‘Planes https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242304563 The Argus (Melb, Vic), Sat 28 Aug 1920 (p.21): AERIAL DERBY – PEACE LOAN CONTEST Lieutenant Treloar Successful Great public interest was shown in the Second Peace Loan aerial Derby from Serpentine (near Bendigo) to Melbourne yesterday. Four machines took part in the race, and the result was as follows: – Lieutenant W.H. TRELOAR……….1 Captain R.W. MACKENZIE………2 Captain C.C. MATHESON………...3 Lieutenant E.A. MUSTARD……….4 The distance covered in the race was approximately 118 miles. ……………………………… Before the departure of the aeroplanes from Serpentine, East Loddon shire’s quota of £19,000 was over-subscribed by £2,500 amid enthusiasm https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/4587383 Weekly Times (Melb, Vic), Sat 4 Sept 1920 (p.40): FIRST AERIAL DERBY WON BY CAPTAIN W.H. TRELOAR Australia’s First Aerial Derby was decided on Friday, August 27. The race was from Serpentine, a few miles beyond Bendigo, to Melbourne, a distance of 116 miles. Four Peace Loan Avro planes took part in the contest. Having circled the township at 1000ft, the machines left Serpentine at 12.15. From there they travelled towards Bendigo, but only two of them could be seen from the city proper. The first machine passed over the city at 12.30, and the second a minute later. Kyneton was more successful, and the four competitors passed over the town. The leader flew over at 12.57, and was followed in quick succession by the others at 12.58, 12.59 and one o’clock. The last plane flew over Kyneton very low, and the others at about 3000ft. At Sunbury the four competitors flew over the centre of town. Two passed at 1.13 p.m. about 500 yards apart, and three minutes later the others passed about 200 yards apart. Thousands of people witnessed the finish of the event at the Melbourne Town Hall. The race resulted in a victory for Capt. W.H. Treloar, who arrived there exactly at 1.30. Seventeen seconds later the second plane, piloted by Capt. R.W. McKenzie, completed the course. An interval of three minutes separated the second and third planes. The latter was in charge of Capt. C.C. Matheson, Lieut E.A. Mustard was fourth. After circling the city for a little while, the planes left for Point Cook. An aerial mail, consisting of hundreds of letters, was carried by the aviators. As the planes left Serpentine at 12.15, the winner’s time was one hour 15 minutes. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Sat 25 Sept 1920 (p.8): To Deniliquin by Air PLANE FASTER THAN TELEGRAM DENILIQUIN, Saturday Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, accompanied by Sergeant-Major Hart, made a record flight in a 90 h.p. de Haviland aeroplane from Melbourne this morning. Leaving the city at 9 o’clock, with the advantage of a favorable wind, they landed at Deniliquin at 11 o’clock. Lieut Treloar called at Echuca for petrol, and the total distance covered was about 170 miles. A telegram announcing his arrival at Deniliquin took two and a quarter hours to reach Port Melbourne. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Wed 6 Oct 1920 (p.15): BENDIGO AND DISTRICT Councillor W.T. Tonkin, president of the East Loddon Shire, entertained Lieut. Treloar and Sergt. Haslett, the winners of the Aerial Derby from Serpentine to Melbourne, and presented the aviators with silver cups, the gifts of the residents of the shire. Captain McKenzie, who finished second, was presented with a prize of £5/5/, the gift of Messrs. O’Neill. Sunraysia Daily (Mildura, Vic), Sat 9 Oct 1920 (p.2): FLIGHT LIEUTENANT W.H. TRELOAR The young Australian whose good fortune it has been to inaugurate the “Sunraysia Daily” aeroplane newspaper delivery (Lieut. W.H. Treloar) is a veteran flier, though a young man. Before the war …………………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/258567343 The Ballarat Star (Vic), Sat 16 Oct 1920 (p.1): PERSONAL Flight Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, of Ballarat, has undertaken the distribution by aeroplane of the “Sunraysia Daily” throughout the Mildura and Riverina districts. The Register (Adelaide, SA), Sat 30 Oct 1920 (p.10): CASUALTIES – PERILS OF THE AIR The daily aeroplane newspaper service which is being maintained between Mildura and Renmark for the delivering of The Sunraysia Daily was interrupted during last week-end. On Saturday morning Lieut. Treloar, who has been on the air track for more than three weeks, ran into a violent storm while attempting the journey to Renmark, and in the vicinity of Kulnine had to put back to Mildura. On Monday morning Lieut. Treloar essayed the journey again, and ascended during the progress of another gale. When flying above Merbein he had engine trouble, which necessitated a forced landing in dangerous country. The pilot safely guided his plane to earth, but subsequently crashed into a fence. Lieut. Treloar was uninjured, but one of the wings of the plane was damaged. Major Shaw, who is in Melbourne, was telegraphed for, and, flying to Mildura in seven hours, he set out shortly after his arrival with a mechanic, Mr Hart. ……………………………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/57917302 Gippsland Times (Vic), Thur 2 Dec 1920 (p.4): Flight-Lieut W.H. Treloar, accompanied by Dr Rutter, of Yarram, arrived at Sale on Sunday afternoon, by aeroplane, and made a safe landing. The visiting medico brought his camera with him, but so interested was he in the sights that met his view that he forgot to take any “snaps.” The biplane – a 100 h.p. De Havilland – went on to Maffra next day, and returned to Sale, several flights being indulged in yesterday. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Mon 27 Dec 1920 (p.7): “The Herald” By Air https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242234751 Geelong Advertiser (Vic), Tue 28 Dec 1920 (p.3): AERIAL DERBY On the Epsom racecourse at Mordialloc yesterday the first Australian Aerial Derby and Flying Carnival was conducted. The programme opened with a parachute dropping competition, in which five machines competed. A white triangle had been marked in the centre of the arena, and competitors had to drop small parachutes while flying over it. ………………….. The winner’s parachute went within 25 yards of the triangle, ……………. PARACHUTE DROPPING COMPETITION First priz,e £15; second prize, £5 D.H.6 (Lieut W.H. Treloar) ..................1 …………………………………………………. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165437062 The Herald (Melb, Vic), Wed 29 Dec 1920 (p.1): “The Herald” By Air Pilot Reviews Trip – SEALS GREET AVIATOR Of the aviators who were engaged yesterday in carrying out the great air service, organized by “The Herald” to link up distant holiday resorts in its distribution service, Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, of the Shaw-Ross Aviation Company, who flew from Port Melbourne to San Remo, experienced the most novel reception. On every flight it is the custom of residents of towns and villages to turn out to greet the airmen and welcome their cargoes of “The Herald,” but as Lieutenant Treloar swung his de Haviland machine across from Flinders to Cowes, the seal colony on Seal Rocks, which lie at the Straits end of Phillip Island, set up a rasping chorus of barks, and the excited movements of the animals proved that the passing of the aeroplane was to them, at any rate, a novel spectacle. “If they were barking for a bundle of ‘Heralds’,” said Lieutenant Treloar smilingly, this morning, “their luck was out. When Seal Rocks is linked up it will have to be submarine. It is no place to park air buses on. Landing in Mistake “My first delivery of ‘Heralds’ after leaving the aerodrome,” continued Lieutenant Treloar, “was at Mornington. The next parcel was for Mount Martha, but not being accustomed to the topography of the foreshore on that side of the bay, I confused that hill with Arthur’s Seat, and made the delivery there. When I landed at Dromana, however, I arranged for a motor car to pick up the parcel and take it to Mount Martha. Sorrento and Portsea were the next towns on the itinerary. “At all the bayside resorts,” the intrepid airman added, “crowds hurried to the appointed delivery places, and waved and cheered as I approached. The flight from Portsea to Flinders was done in good time although the air was ‘bumpy,’ particularly crossing to Cowes and thence to San Remo. At San Remo I made a good landing near the hotel, and, a few minutes later, set out for Cowes, where I spent the night. Night Among Friends “I was given a great time there, and had the good fortune to land near a house occupied, for the time being, by a party of residents of Ivanhoe. I live at Ivanhoe, and was therefore among friends immediately. “At 5.20 this morning I left Cowes, and arrived at the aerodrome without incident at 6.10. Altogether the return trip from Port Melbourne to San Remo was accomplished in 2½ hours. This flight was one of the most attractive from the scenic viewpoint I have yet made. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Thur 30 Dec 1920 (p.1): Delivering “The Herald” by Aeroplane at Cowes [photos] https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242247822 The Herald (Melb, Vic), Thur 30 Dec 1920 (p.11): “Herald” Air Service https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242247834 The Wyalong Advocate and ……….. (NSW), Fri 2 Dec 1921 (p.7): UNLUCKY FLIGHT – Mishaps to Aeroplane Lieutenant Treloar, when leaving Deniliquin for Hay by aeroplane on Wednesday, met with a double mishap. While preparing for the flight the machine suddenly tipped forward and smashed the propeller. After a new propeller had been secured from Melbourne, he continued the journey in gusty wind, and reached Booroorban. In landing a sudden gust turned the machine completely over, again smashing the propeller and doing other damage, the occupants escaping injury. The machine was taken to pieces packed on a motor, and taken to Melbourne for repairs and overhaul. Victoria Police Gazette, Dec 15, 1921 (p.834): OFFENCES OF VIOLENCE WITH PROPERTY IVANHOE – 9.12.21 – Treloar, Ida Emmerson, “Truoro,” Silverdale-road, Ivanhoe, reports stolen from her dwelling, a gold muff chain, 3 feet long, fine wheat pattern; a 15-ct gold and aquamarine and pearl floral spray brooch; a gent’s gold hunting watch, engine turned case, has “W.H. Treloar, Sea Lake,” scratched on inside of front case, inside of back case scratched; a gent’s 18-ct heavy gold ring, two-headed snake pattern; a lady’s half-hoop gold dress ring, set with sapphires in platinum; a lady’s 15-ct gold turquoise marquise ring; a Globite suit-case, 24x15x18, clip fastenings; a pair of black Melton cloth trousers; a pair of grey tweed trousers, with three-cornered tear on leg; a bluey-grey coat and trousers, coat lined with drab linen, nickel buttons on trousers; and a pair of binocular Zeiss field-glasses. Value £55. Entrance was effected by breaking the lead-light and pushing back the catch. – O.18136. 12th December, 1921. The Herald (Melb, Vic), Sat 14 Jan 1922 (p.21): FLIGHT IN A GALE – 45 MILES IN 20 MINUTES MOULAMEIN (N.S.W.), Saturday Captain F. Huxley, of the Shaw Ross Aviation Co., accompanied by Captain W.H. Treloar, of the British Imperial Oil Co., flew from Swan Hill to Moulamein in a Sporting Farman aeroplane in a gale of wind, doing the journey of 45 miles in 20 minutes – roughly, 120 miles an hour. The Age (Melb, Vic), Wed 30 May 1928 (p.18): BENDIGO If the movement that is on foot for the establishment of a proper landing ground for aeroplanes in Bendigo is successful considerable interest will probably be displayed in this and surrounding districts in the possibilities of adapting aircraft to commercial use. One well-known business man in the city, Mr W.H. Treloar, has made arrangements for the purchase of one of the latest types of aeroplanes suitable for commercial use. It is stated that at the present time several projected flights to Bendigo are being cancelled owing to the lack of a suitable landing ground. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Mon 244 Dec 1928 (p.13): EXTENDING AVIATION Five Aeroplanes Visit Bendigo BENDIGO, Sunday – Five Moth aeroplanes, piloted by members of the Victorian section of the Australian Aero Club, arrived in Bendigo yesterday afternoon. ……………………. ……………… A provisional committee, consisting of Messrs. Treloar, …………………., was appointed to form a branch of the club in Bendigo. ……………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3977285 The Age (Melb, Vic), Tue 16 Apr 1929 (p.10): Aerodrome at Bendigo BENDIGO, Monday – Bendigo Aero Club is making good progress with the laying out of its aerodrome at Myer’s Flat, where modern facilities for aviation are being established. It is intended that the aerodrome shall serve as an air fort for northern Victoria and the Riverina. Mr W.H. Treloar, Bendigo representative of the Shell Company, flew to Bendigo from Melbourne, with Mr T. Sissons as pilot, for the purpose of observing landing facilities on the route. They reported that landing grounds were plentiful up to Romsey, but there were not many through the hills. Past Hanging Rock good grounds were available to Taradale, but landing facilities between Elphinstone and Bendigo were bad. Mr Treloar said good fields on this air route should be picked out and fitted with wind indicators. Arrangements have been made for twelve machines from the Victorian Aero Club to come to Bendigo early in May to give an aerial display. The pilots will include Group Captain Smart and Major de Haviland. Later in the month an aerial tour of Victoria will be made. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Tue 16 Apr 1929 (p.7): AEROPLANE FOR BENDIGO Named After City BENDIGO, Monday – Mr Keith Brown is the first resident of Bendigo to buy an aeroplane. He has named it the City of Bendigo. The machine, piloted by Mr W.H. Treloar, who served with the Royal Australian Air Force abroad, was brought to Bendigo and parked in the new hangar at the Bendigo aerodrome, at Myer’s Flat. The Bendigo Aero Club intends seeking the co-operation of landowners between Melbourne and Bendigo in obtaining marked landing-places. The Age (Melb, Vic), Thur 4 Jul 1929 (p.9): AEROPLANE DISASTER – CRASH AT BENDIGO – PILOT AND PASSENGER KILLED Stunting at 4000 Feet BENDIGO, Wednesday – After diving in spiral fashion from a height of between 3000 and 4000 feet, a Moth aeroplane, shortly before 4 p.m. to-day, crashed to the ground …………. The two occupants of the plane – the pilot and a passenger – were killed. ……………………………………………………….. Accompanied by Mr T. Shotter, the Bendigo representative of the Perdriau Rubber Company, Mr Weston, who is the Bendigo representative of the Goodyear Rubber Company, visited the aerodrome this afternoon. During the war he was attached to the Flying Corps, although he had not gained his flying certificate, and it was his intention to become an active member of the Bendigo Aero Club. He signed up after paying the necessary fee, and Mr W.H. Treloar, captain of the club, took him and Mr Shotter for a flight in the Moth aeroplane which the Melbourne club had loaned that instruction in flying might be given to pupils. The flight lasted several minutes, and the machine behaved splendidly. Mr Treloar stated subsequently that the plane answered the controls perfectly. On the completion of the flight Mr Oscar Walton, a ground engineer of the Victorian aerodrome staff, offered to take Mr Weston for another trip into the air. ………… The manoeuvres of the aeroplane were being closely watched by Mr Treloar and others from the ground at the hangar. They became greatly alarmed as they saw the machine continue to spin and dive nose downward towards the ground. It was apparent that the pilot was unable to straighten out the plane, and it struck the ground with a terrific crash. …………………. From a statement made to-night by Mr Treloar, it would appear that the stunting indulged in just before the plane met with disaster was prearranged. Mr Treloar stated that when he descended after the first flight with Messrs Weston and Shotter, the former remarked, “I would like to have had a loop.” He told him he could not spare the time for another flight, as he had to return to Bendigo on business, but that Walton would be going up, and would probably take him. Walton, who was standing near by, said he intended to do some flying, and would take Weston, who then got into the machine. It was obvious, said Mr Treloar, that the two men knew they were going to loop the loop before they ascended, because both of them were strapped in. He heard Walton remark to Weston, “I will give you a stunt or two.” https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/204111261 The Argus (Melb, Vic), Fri 12 Jul 1929 (p.16): BENDIGO AIR TRAGEDY – STUNTING CAUSED CRASH Distance From Ground Misjudged BENDIGO, Thursday – The deputy coroner (Mr J.H. Stewart, J.P.) to-day resumed the inquest into the deaths of Oscar Thomas Walton (pilot) and Arthur Weston (passenger), who were killed in an aeroplane crash near the Bendigo aerodrome on July 3. ……………………………………………………… William Harold Treloar, commercial traveler, captain of the Bendigo Aero Club, said: – I took Weston for a flight just previous to the accident. He expressed a desire to go for a second flight. There was some talk about a stunt, and I saw Walton strapping Weston in the machine. I saw the pilot execute a loop and later a spin, and the aeroplane descended to about 500ft from the ground. The machine then crashed. I agree with Wing-Commander Harrison as to the probable cause of the accident. ……………………………………………… https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/4020877 The Age (Melb, Vic), Thur 25 Jul 1929 (p.14): BENDIGO Addressing the Bendigo Legacy Club on Wednesday, Mr H. Treloar, captain of Bendigo Aero Club, who was one of the first two airmen to be taken prisoner by the Turks in Mesopotamia, stated he had been amused to read recently that Turkey had suggested to the League of Nations that any nation which ill-treated prisoners of war in future should suffer serious reprisals. Although the Turks during the war did not go out of their way to ill-treat prisoners of war by acts of violence, they absolutely neglected them, and thereby caused them intense suffering. The Age (Melb, Vic), Wed 26 Feb 1930 (p.16): BENDIGO Mr W.H. Treloar, who for the past five years has held the position of Bendigo superintendent for the British Imperial Oil Company, has been appointed Shell aviation officer for South Australia. The Age (Melb, Vic), Mon 10 Mar 1930 (p.12): BENDIGO A large number of members of the Bendigo Legacy Club, Rotary Club and Aero Club assembled on Saturday night to farewell Mr W.H. Treloar, who is about to leave for Adelaide to take up a position as aviation officer of the Shell company. Reference was made by speakers to the work Mr Treloar had done as captain of Bendigo Aero Club, especially his efforts to bring about the establishment of an aerodrome in Bendigo. The Age (Melb, Vic), Fri 28 Mar 1930 (p.20): BENDIGO Mr H. Treloar, Bendigo Superintendent of the British Imperial Oil Company, who has been appointed aviation officer for the company in Adelaide, was on Thursday presented by Bendigo Rotary Club with a smoker’s outfit. The chairman, Mr W. Tredinnick, said Mr Treloar had done valuable work at Bendigo in the interests of rotary. The Times and Northern Advertiser, Peterborough, South Australia, Fri 16 May 1930 (p.4): An Experienced Aviator – Captain Treloar Transferred to Adelaide. Captain W.H. Treloar, of the Aviation Department of the Shell Company of Australia Ltd., who has joined the Adelaide branch from Melbourne, has a fine record of aerial achievements, and his knowledge of aerial matters will be of great value to aspiring aviators in South Australia. The early period of 1914 saw him in England, whither he had gone in response to an ardent desire to learn all about aviation. Following an intense study of the practical side of aviation at the Bristol Aircraft Factory at Filton, Captain Treloar joined the Bristol Flying School at Brooklands. There he made rapid progress, for after three hours’ dual and solo flying he secured his pilot’s licence. To further improve his knowledge, Captain Treloar underwent an extended course of study at the Bleriot Aviation School at Brooklands, receiving instruction on several types of Bleriot Monoplanes. The outbreak of war interrupted his studies, but Captain Treloar had obtained sufficient knowledge of aviation, both practical and theoretical, that the call of his own country brought him back to Australia. He secured a commission in the Australian Flying Corps, and was one of the first two Australian pilots to depart on active service. The other pilot was Captain T.W. White, who will be remembered as the author of “Guests of the Unspeakable.” The half-flight to which Captain Treloar and Captain White were attached was sent to India and thence to Mesopotamia, where it linked up with the half-flight of the Royal Flying Corps. After spending several months flying on the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, Captain Treloar had the misfortune of being brought down by enemy fire, being captured near Kut-el-Amarah. He was a prisoner of war for over three years with the Turks. Upon repatriation to Australia, he again took up aviation and spent time flying in Victoria and the Riverina, during which period he gave joy-rides to over 3,000 people. Captain Treloar was closely identified with the Peace Loan programme, and he had the distinction of winning one of the first Aerial Derbies conducted in Victoria, covering 118 miles from Serpentine to Melbourne in 75 minutes. In recognition of this performance he was presented with a silver cup by the East Loddon Shire. Captain Treloar joined the Shell Company of Australia Ltd. in 1919, and while with the company was for 5 years at Bendigo, where he was instrumental in forming the Bendigo Aero Club, and giving advice to young airmen. While in Adelaide, Captain Treloar, in accordance with the Shell Company’s policy, will devote his attention to stimulating public interest in aviation. The Register News- Pictorial (Adelaide, SA), Thur 12 Jun 1930 (p.12): [Photo] Mr W.H. Treloar, aviation officer of the Shell Company, arrived at Parafield yesterday from Bendigo in his own plane, a Gipsy Moth. He covered the 487 miles in 4½ hours. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/54238297 The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 6 Jun 1930 (p.11): FLYING Visit to Bendigo The recent visit to Bendigo by Captain Millier in the Old Gold was arranged by Mr W.H. Treloar, the aviation officer of the Shell Company in Adelaide. Mr Treloar has many recollections of Bendigo, for he was stationed there for several years prior to being transferred to Adelaide. Among his aviation activities Mr Treloar was instrumental in securing an aerodrome for Bendigo and forming the local Aero Club. Being still interested in the town, Mr Treloar thought it a unique opportunity for Captain Miller to visit it on his return from the Victorian Aerial Derby, as prior to his visit the population had not had an opportunity of seeing a modern-equipped passenger machine. According to Mr Treloar, no machine larger than a D.H. 50 had previously landed at the aerodrome. That the visit of the Old Gold was popular is reflected in the number of people who visited the aerodrome and the number who took a flight. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 3 Oct 1930 (p.21): Local Shell Company and Air Travel Mr W.H. Treloar, aviation officer of the Shell Company of Australia, together with Mr W.J. Thompson, the company’s engineer, made a 750-miles aerial tour at the latter part of last week. Their itinerary included Renmark, Loxton, Alawoona, Pinnaroo, Wolseley, Mount Gambier, Millicent, and Kingston, and return to Adelaide. The fliers had an uneventful trip, apart from encountering fog belts between Pinnaroo and Wolseley, and showers of rain which were met en route were avoided in most cases by slight deviation. They had an interesting and comfortable trip, completed without experiencing any inconvenience. Mr Treloar said splendid landing grounds were available at Renmark, Pinnaroo, Mount Gambier, Millicent, and Kingston, but other towns could be classed as only fair. The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA), Fri 17 Oct 1930 (p.10): FLYING GENIUS A smart piece of service work was carried out on Tuesday by the Commercial Aviation Company. Mr W.H. Treloar, while flying to Adelaide, had to make a forced landing in his VH-UHG Moth, when a cylinder head suddenly cracked. He made a creditable landing in a sandy paddock, and communicated with Adelaide. The Commercial Aviation Company dispatched two cylinder heads by plane to the spot where the crippled plane was a few minutes after the advice they received. The spare head was fitted and the aviator was able to reach Parafield the same evening. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Mon 27 Apr 1936 (p.10): SOLDIERS MEET – More Anzac Reunions ………………………. Former members of the Half Flight, Australia’s first Air Force squadron, were received at the home of the Minister for Customs (Lieut-Colonel T.W. White) in Domain road after the Anzac Day service. The assembly was probably one of the most picturesque of the reunions. Only 14 men of those who served with the flight in Palestine were there. Lieut-Colonel White renewed acquaintance with Lieutenant W.H. Treloar, with whom he was captured by Turks in 1916 [sic] and imprisoned. Other “half-flighters” there who are still in aviation were Mr A. Shorland (chief inspector for the Civil Air Board) and Mr J. Stubbs (chief engineer of Holyman’s Airways). The Herald (Melb, Vic), Thur 12 Oct 1950 (p.8): DEATHS TRELOAR – On October 11 (suddenly), at Bendigo, William Harold, beloved husband of Ida Treloar, of 82 The Righi, Heidelberg, and dearly loved father of Ross, Eric, and Janette (Mrs K. Ireson), loved father-in-law of Nancy and Keith, dear grandfather of Judith. Aged 61 years. Late F/L No.1 Squadron AFC. Floral tributes to Taylor’s Chapel. FUNERAL NOTICES TRELOAR – The funeral of the late MR WILLIAM HAROLD TRELOAR (late F/L No.1 Squadron AFC) will leave Taylor’s Chapel, 81 Heidelberg Road, Ivanhoe, TOMORROW (Friday) after a service commencing at 1.45 p.m., for the Warringal Cemetery, Heidelberg. The Age (Melb, Vic), Thur 19 Oct 1950 (p.9): Advertising WILLIAM HAROLD TRELOAR, formerly of 82 The Right, Heidelberg, but late of Lyttleton-terrace, Bendigo, Motor Salesman, deceased. – After 14 days William Herbert Ross Treloar, of 82 The Right, Heidelberg, wireless operator, and Eric John Treloar, of Penfield Area, Salisbury, in South Australia, draftsman, the executors appointed by deceased’s WILL, dated 30th September, 1950, will APPLY to the Supreme Court for a GRANT of PROBATE thereof. Contact Magazine: VALE We record with great regret the passing of Mr W.H. Treloar, who died suddenly on the 11th October. Mr Treloar, who had been a member of the sub-branch for many years, was an outstanding figure and pioneer of aviation. Volunteering in England for service on the 4th August, 1914, after obtaining his flying licence in July the same year, Lieutenant Treloar, as he then was, saw service in Mesopotamia with Capt. T.W. White, now Minister for Air, and was one of two officers who were the first to be captured as prisoners of war after 11 months’ fighting. He was a prisoner in Tukey for three years. Returning to Australia he obtained his Civil Aviation Licence, with the early number of 20 in June, 1921, and pioneered many Australian air routes, flying a 100 h.p. De Haviland army pattern bi-plane. In those days passenger flying was much of a novelty and a hazardous enterprise, and the many press references testify to the outstanding achievements of Mr Treloar in the field of civil aviation. In this regard it is interesting to note that 30 years ago the St Arnaud Times endorsed its editions with “Special delivery by Lieut. Treloar’s aeroplane.” Flying an Avro machine Mr Treloar won the first Australian Aerial Derby, an event arranged to advertise the 2nd Peace Loan. The race was from Serpentine, a distance of 116 miles, with the Melbourne Town Hall clock as the finishing point. Mr Treloar was a member of the Royal Aero Club, UK., and one of the founders of the Aero Club, Legacy and Rotary Clubs at Bendigo. A man of outstanding record, he was, nevertheless of a modest and retiring disposition and held in high regard by all those who knew him. We offer our deepest sympathy to his widow and family. [Source: National Museum Australia]