• Caroline Ellen Wilson

Army / Flying Corps
    Unknown
    Unknown
  • Sister

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  • 1914 Star
  • Date of Birth

    Monday, 14 April 1879

  • Left Australia for England to further nursing training

    Wednesday, 9 July 1913

  • Tidal wave at sea on the Benalla

    Tuesday, 22 July 1913

  • Joint War Committee of Red Cross and Order of St. John of Jerusalem

    Thursday, 10 September 1914

  • Stobart medical unit arrived in Antwerp

    Tuesday, 22 September 1914

  • Stobart medical unit fled Antwerp

    Thursday, 8 October 1914

  • ANGLO-FRENCH HOSPITAL, NO. 2, CHATEAU TOURLAVILLE, CHERBOURG opened

    Friday, 6 November 1914

  • ANGLO-FRENCH HOSPITAL, NO. 2, CHATEAU closed

    Wednesday, 24 March 1915

  • The American Hospital of Paris, section for the wounded, Neuilly-sur-Seine

    Saturday, 24 April 1915

  • End of B.I.F service

    Saturday, 30 September 1916

  • Q.A.I.M.N.S. (R) Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service (Reserve) (dates tbc)

    Sunday, 1 October 1916 - Sunday, 30 June 1918

  • British Imperial Army Nursing Service (tbc)

    Monday, 1 July 1918 - Sunday, 7 July 1918

  • Urgent request from the Australian Military Headquarters Matron in Chief of Australian Army Nursing Service to serve on an Australian Hospital Auxiliary Boat voluntarily, with the intent of joining the Australian Army Nursing Service in Australia (date tbc)

    Monday, 8 July 1918

  • “Barunga” sinking incident

    Monday, 15 July 1918

  • "Boonah" arrived in Perth (Disembarked in Adelaide)

    Saturday, 14 September 1918

  • Appointment to AANS

    Thursday, 6 February 1919

  • Demobilised on account of reduction of staff

    Tuesday, 17 June 1919

  • Date of Death

    Sunday, 1 September 1974

Stories and comments
    • Medals of Caroline E Wilson (Full size)
    • Posted by smiller366, Sunday, 22 February 2015

    This is a photo of her full size medals. Note the rose. The 1914 Star recipients who actually served under enemy fire were also issued the ‘5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914’ clasp. The rose is worn on the riband, instead of the clasp, when in undress uniform.

    Medals of Caroline E Wilson (Full size)
    • Medals of Caroline E Wilson (inscription)
    • Posted by smiller366, Sunday, 22 February 2015

    This is the inscription on back of her 1914 Star

    Inscription on back of her 1914 Star
    • Medals of Caroline E Wilson (miniatures)
    • Posted by smiller366, Sunday, 22 February 2015

    This is a photo of her miniature medals

    Medals of Caroline E Wilson (miniatures)
    • British Medal Index Card for Caroline E Wilson WO_372_23_45409 (front)
    • Posted by smiller366, Tuesday, 24 February 2015

    Campaign:- B.E.F. 1914 (A) When decoration was earned (B) Present situation Org: (A) Mrs Stobart Unit (B) St Johns Ambulance Nurse 394; Wilson, Caroline E. (Miss) Action taken:- Disembarkation: 22.9.14 Antwerp over

    British Medal Index Card for Caroline E Wilson WO_372_23_45409 (front)
    • British Medal Index Card for Caroline E Wilson WO_372_23_45409 (back)
    • Posted by smiller366, Tuesday, 24 February 2015

    Nurse Wilson applied for 1914 Star 28.11.17 Miss E C Trestrail forwards application for 1914 Star 21.1.18 3. Application by BRCS forward of 1914 Star on behalf of Mrs StClair Stobart’s Unit 13.6.18

    British Medal Index Card for Caroline E Wilson WO_372_23_45409 (back)
    • Public records about Caroline E Wilson
    • Posted by smiller366, Tuesday, 24 February 2015

    Dispatched to the Front (20th September 1914) British Nursing Journal, September 26, 1914, page 245 *** 1914: Antwerp *** The Last Days of Antwerp (Sep to Oct, 1914) The Australasian Nurses’ Journal, Dec. 15, 1914, pages 408-410 “An Exciting Experience: A Local Lady in Belgium: Hidden in a Cellar” Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), Friday 4 December 1914, page 5 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129986374 “BROKEN HILL LADY IN BELGIUM: THRILLING EXPERIENCES OF NURSE WILSON” Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Sunday 3 January 1915, page 2 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45309773 “Experiences of a Nurse at War” Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 4 June 1915 page 3 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109500547 “A BROKEN HILLITE IN PARIS: LETTER FROM EX-DISTRICT NURSE WILSON” Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Sunday 6 June 1915, page 3 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45369763 "LETTERS FROM THE FRONT: THE FLIGHT FROM ANTWERP." The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 9 February 1915 page 6 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/59115482 *** 1914-1915: Cherbourg, France *** A: Experiences of a Nurse at the War Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 4 June 1915 page 3 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109500547 B: Nursing the Wounded Soldiers Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 30 July 1915 page 7 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109500907 *** 1915: Paris *** Nursing the Wounded Soldiers (Feb, 1915) Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 13 August 1915 page 4 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501025 Nursing the Wounded Soldiers (Mar 1915) Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 20 August 1915 page 5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501052 The American Hospital in Paris (May, 1915) Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 17 September 1915 page 4 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501228 No Continuation Found *** 1918: Our Homeward Voyage *** Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 17 January 1919 page 2 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109507054 *** 1918: Welcome Home *** Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 4 October 1918 page 2 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109507583 *** IWM Lives of the First World War *** https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/lifestory/4972342 [note mistake re British Army, Young Mens Christian Association] Medal Index Cards Transcription https://search.livesofthefirstworldwar.org/record?id=GBM/MCI/4977746 [note mistake re British Army, Young Mens Christian Association not on this page] *** 1913: Notes on a Trip to England *** Part 1 Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 3 September 1915 page 4 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501154 Part 2 Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 8 October 1915 page 4 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501326 Part 3 Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Friday 22 October 1915 page 3 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109501391 Part 4 No Continuation Found *** 1908 *** Photo including Caroline E Wilson, Claire Trestrail and E. Maude Bottrill http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/164102642

    • Pre-Anzac letter
    • Posted by smiller366, Friday, 24 April 2015

    The American Hospital of Paris Section for the Wounded 24th April, 1915 Dear Father and Mater, Yesterday I was pleased to get home letters, and to know that you were both well, you wondered if I would stay another three months in France, so you see that time is long past. I am seriously thinking of returning to England next month but travelling now is such a bother, to cross the channel I will have to get a French passport and also have my English one inspected besides this we all have to be registered by the police, so that if I do cross over I suppose I will stay that side. All the military nursing in England is to be directly under the war office, if they would take nurses for a short period I would not mind joining but I think the term of the war very very indefinite. Thanks very much for the good wishes and I will be pleased to receive the next letter, it is very good of you to remember me so often. I still have my Xmas gift by as I have not been back to London to change it yet. I am quite looking forward to next month because on the 19th May I will have 100 francs. We get that each month after the 2nd. It is not much but much better than nothing. We have 500 patients in, what do you think the total of meals per month? It mounts to 52,000, so you can imagine there is not very much individual care. So you can well believe we will all appreciate home cooking when we are fortunate enough to get it. It a mere detail whether eggs are cooked, they just pop them in boiling water and out, often when you open one it is not warmed through, but this does not matter to a French man as he is fond of raw eggs. I told you in my last letter of our visit to Senlis. I have not been out since then, except to walk in the Bois de Boulogne, it is lovely, every day more leaves are out and it is so fresh and green, spring is very late in England I believe the trees are only budding. It is no wonder poets rave about the spring on this side of the globe, but we miss the smell of the wattle and the gum trees, the honey here has no flavour, our bees would be ashamed of it. I am off night duty. I did seven weeks and it is charming to go bed at night, the only disadvantage I know is that one has to get up every morning. I saw a wonderful American doctor operate this morning, it was most interesting. The Xray plate showed the bullet plainly, it was in the lower part of the skull about like that, he went to work like an expert and within about 20 minutes drew out the large piece. I think it was a shrapnel ball as it was not round and smooth enough for a bullet. The small piece gave more trouble and proved to be a piece of shattered bone. He made the incision and then bored through the bone with an instrument just like a gimlet; it was wonderful to see him work. I do hope the patient does well. It is sad to see many of these poor wrecks and yet they are very cheerful. The American doctors here use a new anaesthetic. The patient is unconscious whilst he is inhaling the gas but as soon as the cap is removed he is quite conscious. They always give a little pure oxygen just as the operation is finished. So far it has seemed very satisfactory, the patient not suffering from sickness after, and after all minor operations they walk back to the wards. This hospital has wards on 1st, 2nd and 3rd floors and would you believe it all the food is carried up by maids, it is quite a sight to see the procession leaving the kitchen. I often wonder why all those able to do not descend to eat, it would be surely be easier. At present I live on the 3rd floor, it is quite easy to get lost in the different corridors at first. You have often heard of the traffic of the Paris streets, of course now it is only about half of the normal, but even now it is rather terrifying, quite enough as to make me appreciate the following extract which I copy for your benefit from a book by E.V. Lucas. He is speaking of “The Place de la Concorde”

    • Remembering the 1914 Star and Clasp Recipients
    • Posted by smiller366, Saturday, 10 November 2018

    The 1914 Star was awarded to those who served in France or Belgium on the strength of a unit between 5-Aug-1914 and midnight 22/23-Nov-1914. Only ~20 nurses and a very small number of Australians received this medal. The bronze clasp was issued to those who actually served under enemy fire. The 3 Australian nurses were Caroline Ellen Wilson (3rd row, seated in a chair, far right), Claire Trestrail (2nd row in front of Mrs Stobart) and Catherine Tully (on Claire’s left, tbc).

    Stobart Hospital, Antwerp, September-October 1914
    • Nursing in the war on influenza
    • Posted by smiller366, Thursday, 28 February 2019

    On Saturday 1-Mar-1919, The Register in Adelaide listed people in quarantine at the Jubilee Exhibition Grounds on the previous Wednesday and Thursday. These included Miss E. Opie and Nurse C.E. Wilson. Nurse Caroline Ellen Wilson and Eleanor Opie had travelled to England in 1913 on the “Benalla”, which was struck by a tidal wave. Carrie had also survived the bombing of Antwerp in October 1914 while nursing in the Stobart Hospital under the Joint War Committee of Red Cross and Order of St. John of Jerusalem. Eleanor, an artist, undertook her nursing training in England. In 1918, Carrie and Eleanor received an urgent request from the Australian Military Headquarters, Matron in Chief of Australian Army Nursing Service, to serve on an Australian Hospital Auxiliary Boat voluntarily, with the intent of joining the Australian Army Nursing Service in Australia. They arrived back in Australia from England with troops on the “Boonah” in September 1918. They had lost all their personal possessions when their first ship, the “Barunga”, was torpedoed and sunk in July 1918. They promptly tried to join the AANS but needed to replace their nursing documents lost when the “Barunga” was sunk. On 18-Feb-1919, they were sent to Melbourne to nurse influenza patients, but returned on 26-Feb-1919. It appears they returned to the Adelaide Jubilee Exhibition Grounds. The SLSA collection of photos by Jack A.P. Kaines shows some of the nurses where Carrie and Eleanor are almost certainly in the middle of PRG 1638/2/105 and on the right in PRG 1638/2/53 https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/PRG+1638/2/105

    Nurses by a tent at the Quarantine Camp, Jubilee Oval
    • Group of nurses with two cricket bats at the Quarantine Camp, Jubilee Oval
    • Posted by smiller366, Thursday, 28 February 2019

    Carrie wearing wicket keeping gloves on the bottom right. Eleanor Opie standing behind Carrie on the top right. https://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/PRG+1638/2/53

    Group of nurses with two cricket bats at the Quarantine Camp, Jubilee Oval