• Annie Christine Jackson

  • British War Medal
  • Victory Medal
Stories and comments
    • JACKSON, Annie Christina – Staff Nurse, QAIMNSR
    • Posted by FrevFord, Wednesday, 21 August 2019

    Annie was born in 1891 at Gre Gre Village, Vic (near St Arnaud) – the daughter of George JACKSON and Janet FRAME, who married in Vic in 1887 Janet died on the 14/7/1915 Gre Gre, aged 54 and George died 25/9/1949, aged 97 – they are buried together in the St Arnaud Cemetery Siblings (all born Gre Gre): George Isaac b.1887; Florence Irene b.1889; James Albert b.1893; Ella Jean b.1895; Herbert Ernest b.1896 – Farm Hand – WW1: L/Cpl 1944, 57th Bn – DOW 2/8/1918 France; Decima Daisy b.1898 (teacher); Herman Leslie b.1901 Trained in nursing at the St Arnaud Hospital – qualifying as a member of the Royal Victorian Trained Nurses Association in November 1913 Appointed to the position of Acting Matron of the St Arnaud Hospital in March 1915; replacing Mabel Pilkington who had been accepted for service with the Australian Army Nursing Service. WW1 Service: Repat 1959 [ANA series no MT1487/1]: “Sister Annie C Jackson, fully qualified, certificated Nurse applied for service with the AANS, AIF, early in 1915. Having no vacancy at that particular time, I drafted her into the quota of nurses for service with the RAMC. She left Aust on 18/12/15 on the HMS Karoola and returned to Australia on the TS Malta 28/9/1918 and reported to me. She served all that time abroad with the QAIMNSR in France. (Sgd) L. Hill, (late) Princ Matron, AANS & (late) Acting Matron-in-Chief, AANS” Drafted into service with Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve, Annie embarked on the HMS Karoola 18/12/1915 for England where she was posted to the Lord Derby Hospital at Warrington on the 10/2/1916. She then crossed to France on the 1/4/1916 and joined the 11th General Hospital, Etaples on the 2/4/1916, where she served until 2/12/1916 Report by Acting Matron E.M. Lang, QAIMNS, 11 Gen Hosp, 24/9/1916 (p.14 SR): Date of joining Unit 2/4/1916 “She is an excellent worker and an extremely capable nurse. She has worked very well in Theatre and is equally good at ward duty and gives the greatest satisfaction always.” Posted to 2/1 S. Mid Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) – then the 43rd CCS 5/4/1917 – 61st CCS Aug 1917 As a member of a mobile operating team, she was stationed at the 2nd ACCS in June 1917 From letter published Nov 1917: “The Hun airmen are having a very busy time, so, of course are ours. The air just hums day and night with planes. On two occasions they came over and bombed our Casualty Clearing Station, doing a good deal of damage. They wounded three sisters, one medical officer, and killed two men. On the second visit they killed three and wounded 16 patients. Our kitchen, panty, and mess and their bell tents were blown about the first time, and as one might expect the staff were greatly frightened. Now we have six layers of sand bags round our bell tents, also a place built of sandbags, and known to everyone as the Sister’s Funk Hole. Of course we go there if we are off duty, and it is rather laughable. You see a searchlight go up, then hear a hum, and immediately there is a run for cover. You feel exactly like a rabbit – just feel and wonder if you will be caught half way. I am on night duty in the theatre, so we have no time for funk holes, and just carry on. They do not bomb us now, but all round about the camps, and our archies’ anti-aircraft nose caps and shrapnel fly in all directions, and you have to get out of their way.” Posted to the 11th Stationary Hospital on the 9/9/1917 Report by Matron, QAIMNS, 11 Stationary Hosp, 9/12/1917 (p.16 SR): Date of joining Unit 9/9/1917 “Very capable surgical nurse with theatre experience. Miss Jackson is very suitable for promotion to Sister – she is tactful and a good manager and very neat in her work.” Admitted to the 8th General Hospital on the 6/2/1918 with a fever of unknown origin – discharged to the Convalescent Home at Cannes 3/3/1918 Rejoined the 11th Stat Hosp 19/3/1918 Posted to the 74th General Hospital on the 1/4/1918 To England 15/6/1918 Resigned her appointment at expiration of contract, stating her desire to return to Australia due to the death of her mother [however, her mother had actually died 5 months before Annie left home!] Resignation accepted 5/9/1918 Returned to Australia on the TS Malta departing Devonport 2/8/1918 and arriving 28/9/1918 Listed on the Scroll of Honour in the St Arnaud Presbyterian Church Married Bernard Oscar Charles DUGGAN on the 17th of November 1920 at St Mary’s RC Church, East St Kilda [Born 12/1/1887 Sutherland, (near St Arnaud) –son of John and Sarah Frances (nee Olarenshaw); Farmer – WW1: Lt Col, DSO&Bar, 21st Bn – WW2 – died 1964 Ballarat] The couple had no children Address 1922: Le Touquet, Cooroc (via St Arnaud), Vic Lived St Arnaud / Geelong / Ballarat Applied for Repat 1959 Annie died on the 28th of February 1978 at St Arnaud, Vic, aged 86, and was buried in the St Arnaud Cemetery *************** St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 16 Sept 1914 (p.4): ST ARNAUD HOSPITAL Sister Laity having resigned as sister it was recommended that Nurse Jackson be appointed to the position. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 14 Apr 1915 (p.2): ST ARNAUD HOSPITAL The next business was the appointment of a Sister for the hospital, to take the place of Sister Jackson, who had been promoted to the position of acting matron during the absence at the war of the matron, Miss Pilkington. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 8 Dec 1915 (p.2): XMAS CHEER Sir, - I desire to appeal through your columns for donations in cash or in kind for the annual Xmas treat to the patients in our local hospital. I feel confident that your readers will respond in their usual generous manner, so that those who are unfortunate enough to be inmates of our institution during the festive season may have some little pleasure and enjoyment during the dark hours of illness and trouble, - Yours, etc., ANNIE JACKSON, Acting Matron, St Arnaud, Dec 7th 1915 St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 8 Dec 1915 (p.2): LOCAL AND GENERAL Sister Jackson, acting matron of the St Arnaud Hospital, who some time ago placed her services as a nurse at the disposal of the Defence Department, yesterday morning received a wire stating that her offer had been accepted. The visiting committee met last night for the purpose of taking steps to relieve Sister Jackson of her duties at the institution at the earliest possible moment. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Sat 18 Dec 1915 (p.2): LOCAL AND GENERAL Sister Jackson, acting matron of the St Arnaud Hospital, whose services as a nurse for the war have been accepted, left St Arnaud on Thursday for Melbourne, and will sail to-day. Prior to her departure from St Arnaud, the president of the hospital, Mr M.P. Kelly, on behalf of the committee, presented Sister Jackson with a purse of sovereigns, as well as a letter of introduction, under the seal of the hospital, to Sir Peter McBride, Agent-General for Victoria. The nursing staff at the hospital presented Sister Jackson with a fountain pen. The Ballarat Courier (Vic), Thur 17 Feb 1916 (p.7): ST ARNAUD NURSE ON WAR SERVICE Sister Jackson, formerly on the staff of the St Arnaud Hospital, whose services as a nurse for the war have been accepted by the Defence Department, has commenced duty at the Lord Derby Hospital, Warrington, England. A cablegram to that effect has been received in St Arnaud. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 13 Sept 1916 (p.2): LETTER FROM SISTER JACKSON Sister Jackson, formerly acting matron of the St Arnaud Hospital, writing from France to friends in St Arnaud, says:- I intended writing long ago, but we have been so busy that there was no off duty time at all, and when we did get off, the first thing I thought of was to go to bed, in case the next day would be worse than the last. We were so tired we could hardly move, and it was not only admitting the patients, getting them bathed, fed, and dressings done, but their kit would have to be got ready, and, when we were at our busiest, a notice would come round for an evacuation. We would get about ten minutes to have 15 stretcher cases ready, and every one must have tickets tied on to their coats, and numerous other notices to be sent, with name, rank, and regimental particulars to the various offices. Perhaps before they were out of the ward another would arrive. I often wondered there were not some bungles in the lists. There are some to be put on the dangerously ill and others on the seriously ill lists, and twice a day the condition of each patient is sent to the office. Then after a convoy a Red Cross officer goes round to each patient, finding out any news to enable him to trace previously reported missing men. We are not quite so busy now, but have to work terribly hard to get things prepared. With the last convoy we took in quite a number of our boys – most of the N.S.W. – none that I knew. Of course you have heard that Hal Young has been wounded again. He has had his share. He is expecting to be back again in about a fortnight. If he is sent to the base I shall see him again, as it is only about three miles away, but if he goes back to his company they will be down east of where Sister Pilkington is. I cannot mention names of places. I saw Major Duggan when at hospital. He is also down the line, where Hal will be going. Will Campbell (Sister Campbell’s brother) is also there. We are having very nice weather in France at present. Of course it cannot come up to the Australian sunshine. We only get a few fine days, then more rain. We are only 20 minutes’ walk from the beach, but it is very dangerous, so we cannot indulge in the luxury of sea bathing. I am hoping to get leave at the end of September, and I hope Sister Pilkington and I can manage to go at the same time. I am hoping to visit Scotland. I would like to see Paris and Marseilles. Hope I have time “appres le guerre.” I would be very disappointed if I did not after spending so long in France. Sister Jackson concludes with kindly reference to St Arnaud, and remembrances to friends. The Argus (Melb, Vic), Fri 6 Jul 1917 (p.5): NURSE IN THE DANGER ZONE Miss Annie Jackson, who was trained as a nurse at the St Arnaud Hospital, at the close of 1915, while acting as matron, volunteered for service. Since then, save for one short furlough, she has been on duty in France. In a letter dated May 10 to a relative in Melbourne she says:- “I am awfully pleased at having an opportunity to get so close up to the line, and to be in the danger zone. Our coming here had to be voluntary, and there are only four of us. Although we have plenty of hard work, I think we are all happy. I have seen guns, aeroplanes, tanks, and dugouts, and have visited several of the places the Huns thought their strong points, and from which they thought nothing would move them. Last night we had a Royal Flying Corps officer brought in. He had been fighting Boche planes, when one put a bullet through his engine. He fell 7,000 ft, and landed just near us. He was scratched and severely shaken, but no bones were broken. I told you before of a Boche plane coming over our camp, and firing down on us. We were all rather nervous then, but there was some excuse for our nervousness.” St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Sat 28 Jul 1917 (p.2): ST ARNAUD HOSPITAL MrDunkley referred to the fact that six former members of the hospital nursing staff had offered their services and been accepted for duty in the military hospitals abroad. That was a splendid record of patriotism. The ladies he referred to were – Matron Pilkington, Acting Matron Jackson, Acting Matron Campbell, Nurses Fielding, Murray, and Polkinghorne. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Sat 18 Aug 1917 (p.4): A NURSES’S LETTER SISTER A.C. JACKSON Sister A.C. Jackson, formerly acting matron at the St Arnaud Hospital, has sent along an interesting letter to an acquaintance in St Arnaud. Writing from 2nd Australian C.C.S., France, under date June 6th, 1917, Sister Jackson says:- You will notice I am now at an Australian unit and must say I like it very much. It was like coming home to get amongst Australians once more. I am still going round the country as one of an operating team. It is very interesting, but there is only one drawback, that is, one never gets any rest at all. As soon as one finishes at once place, a push commences somewhere else in the line, and we are immediately sent on there. Usually the visiting team is put on night duty, and, when a push is on, the theatre people have to do 16 hours’ duty. I have been on a team now for eight weeks, and have had a very interesting time indeed. While attached with our abdominal operating centre to a field ambulance, I had a good opportunity of seeing things that would have been quite impossible otherwise. I managed to get to Arras and Bapaume. Of course sisters are not supposed to be allowed in, but we got on an ambulance going in and just went. We saw the Arras Cathedral. It has been an enormous building, but is a most awful wreck now. The town itself is quite large. I did not see it all, as they began shelling it, and we thought a hasty exit would mean safety for us. Bapaume is even more of a wreck. You will remember the H.Q. staff being blown up with the Town Hall. We saw where the Town Hall had stood, but there was nothing remaining excepting a pile of rubbish. Not a wall was standing. We did not stay there very long either, and just as well, as we heard afterwards that it was very heavily shelled soon after we left. Last Thursday we left the Field Ambulance and went to Dernacourt to our C.C.S., and on our way we passed through Albert. When we arrived here, we found the C.C.S. packing up ready for a move, also orders for our team to proceed next day to Hazebrouck for further orders, so at 8.30a.m. we began once more in an ambulance and arrived here. (I cannot mention the place.) But we came 90 miles from Dernacourt right up north into Flanders, and the scenery at this time of the year is just gorgeous. We quite enjoyed the trip. Everyone envies us very much. I mean as regards sight-seeing. I am very fond of theatre work, and do not think I will altogether like going back to ward work. Perhaps the teams will go on for duration. Of course, once we put in for leave, it will all end, and we will probably land at the base. My leave is due now, and the two whom I went with last December are away on leave now, so I am not applying for mine until I see what happens to them. If they are sent to the base, then I’m not asking for leave; if not, I will in about a month. Am thinking of going to Scotland again. Would like to see Ireland, but it is so far, and I feel that I want a rest this time. I’m dreadfully tired; have had little or no off duty time for the past six months. Sightseeing has to be done when you are on night duty, and that means that it all comes out of one’s sleeping hours. We had a gas alarm at 3a.m. yesterday. Everyone has to get the gas masks ready, but thank goodness, it did not come so far. They are horrid things to keep on for any length of time. The morning before, they put over a few tears shells, I can tell you it was a pathetic sight to see a surgeon and sister operating, both weeping, tears rolling down their cheeks. It makes your eyes and throat sting for a time, but still I would prefer that to the thought of gas. The gased cases we sometimes get in make one rather scared. You will be having some winter weather now. We feel it quite hot over here. When the heat registers 90 deg. we feel it dreadfully. I do not know whether the intensely cold winter makes us feel it more, but that is the case. At home, we would not consider 90 deg. very hot, but we do over here. St Arnaud Mercury (Vic), Wed 14 Nov 1917 (p.4): LETTERS FROM ST ARNAUD NURSES SISTER A.C. JACKSON Sister Jackson, formerly acting matron of the St Arnaud Hospital, who is attached to a Casualty Clearing Station in France, in a letter to a friend says:- The war still goes on and seems as if it is likely to. I am not going to try and tell you any news. You probably know just as much and more than we do. We get the morning and evening communiques, but only for our army, so we never know what the others are doing, but we hope we are winning. The Hun airmen are having a very busy time, so, of course are ours. The air just hums day and night with planes. On two occasions they came over and bombed our Casualty Clearing Station, doing a good deal of damage. They wounded three sisters, one medical officer, and killed two men. On the second visit they killed three and wounded 16 patients. Our kitchen, panty, and mess and their bell tents were blown about the first time, and as one might expect the staff were greatly frightened. Now we have six layers of sand bags round our bell tents, also a place built of sandbags, and known to everyone as the Sister’s Funk Hole. Of course we go there if we are off duty, and it is rather laughable. You see a searchlight go up, then hear a hum, and immediately there is a run for cover. You feel exactly like a rabbit – just feel and wonder if you will be caught half way. I am on night duty in the theatre, so we have no time for funk holes, and just carry on. They do not bomb us now, but all round about the camps, and our archies’ anti-aircraft nose caps and shrapnel fly in all directions, and you have to get out of their way. By the time this reaches you you will be having nice hot weather. Ours will be cold – oh, so cold. I just dread it. The Ballarat Star (Vic), Mon 21 Oct 1918 (p.2): ST ARNAUD DEATHS FROM WOUNDS Lance-Corporal Herbert Jackson, aged 21 years, son of Mr Geo. Jackson, died on October 2nd from wounds received in battle. He enlisted 2½ years ago. He was a brother of Sister A.C. Jackson, formerly acting matron of St Arnaud Hospital, but latterly of the Imperial Nursing Service in France. The Ballarat Courier (Vic), Mon 11 Nov 1918 (p.6): NURSE RETURNS FROM FRONT Sister A.C. Jackson, formerly acting matron of the St Arnaud Hospital, recently returned from the Front, where she had been on nursing duty for a considerable period. The residents of Gre Gre Village have presented Sister Jackson with a gold bangle suitably inscribed. Advocate (Melb, Vic), Thur 3 Jun 1920 (p.25): Personal and Social The engagement is announced of Miss Annie C. Jackson, late Queen Alexandra’s Nursing Service (Australian section), second daughter of Mr G. Jackson, Gre Gre Village, near St Arnaud, to Lieut-Col B.O.C. Duggan, D.S.O., late 21st Batt., A.I.F., second son of Cr J Duggan, J.P., of Sutherland, near St Arnaud. Table Talk (Melb, Vic), Thur 23 Dec 1920 (p.9): Lieut-Colonel B.O.C. Duggan to Sister Annie C. Jackson An interesting wedding was celebrated at St Mary’s R.C. Church, East St Kilda, at 4pm on November 17, the Rev Father J.M. Coyne being the officiating clergyman, when Sister Annie E. Jackson (late Queen Alexandra’s Army Nursing Service), second daughter of Mr Geo Jackson, of Gre Gre Village, near St Arnaud, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Lieut-Colonel B.O.C. Duggan, D.S.O. (late 21st Batt., A.I.F.), second son of Cr J. Duggan, of Sutherland, near St Arnaud. All the principals had been on active service and wore uniform for the occasion. The bride, who was escorted to the altar by her cousin, Private T.S. Power (late A.A.M.C.), was attended by Sister M. Pilkington and Sister M. Duggan (both late A.A.N.S.), while the bridegroom was supported by Lieut J.L. Watt, M.C., and Captain L.R. Brookes (late adjutant and quartermaster respectively of the 21st Batt., A.I.F.). After the ceremony the usual toasts were honoured at a wedding tea at Carylon’s Hotel, where the tables were tastefully decorated with the colors of the bride and bridegroom. The cake was cut with a German dagger, captured at the battle of Mt St Quentin by the bridegroom. The honeymoon was spent at Lorne.